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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 21, 1909. 



No. 1 



FRESHMAN CLA6S 



FOOTBALL OUTLOOK 



Largest in History of College. >9«3 Gage of Dartmouth to Coach Squad. 



of 



s:ate while 
h-iyhboring 



Leverett 

v/tit Pelham 

Jochituate 

Ji Pepperell 
Westboro 
Somerville 
ew Bedford 
yville, Dal. 
Wollaston 
Franklin 
Wollaston 
Fall River 
Groton 



Eight "M" Men Report for 
Practice. 

Football practice for the season be- 
gan September 13, with only a few of 
the old men back. It consisted of pass- 
ing the ball and a little kicking. Tues- 
day about twenty men were out in uni- 
form for the first time. Six of last 
year's "M" men were among the 




Claims One Hundred a >d 
Twenty-three. 

On Wednesday, Sept. I .5, the 
largest class that ever enterfc: Massa- 
chusetts was regist-red. Cne hun- 
dred and six reside in the 
seventeen hail from the 
states. The list is as foil 

1913 
Adams, Winford F. 
Allen, Harry W. 
Ames, Francis L. 
Anderson, Oscar G. 
Angier, Harris W. 
Baird, Harry A. 
Baker, Dean F. 
Baker, Horace M. 
Baker, Warren S. 
Barber, George W. 
Blake, Ralph C. 
Borden, Ralph J. 
Bradley. John W. 
Brewer, Charleworth H 

Mt. 'ernon, N. Y. 

Brown, Herbert A. Saxonville 

Billiard, Alvan H. £c Framingham 

Burby, Lawrence W. ^hicopee Falls 

Bursley, Harold B. Peabody 

■-uuuveH. Daviw c ^ So. Byfieid 

Carver, John S. KosliDdaue 

Chun, Woon Y. ^langhai. China 

Clark, Norman R. Worcester 

Clegg, Frank J. Fall River 

Cleveland, Waldo A. Baldwinville 

Cobb, Joseph B. Chicopee Falls 

Cole, Arlin T. West Chesterfield 

Coleman, Isaac Boston ' number; Captain Blaney, Schermer- 

Cooper, Everett H. Greenwood horn, Leonard, Hazen, of the senior 

Cory, Harold R.therford, N. J. \ class, Morse. Ml and Walker '12. 

Cowles, Winfred P. Hadley Seven Freshftien of unknown quality 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

"Lend a Hand" the Watchword 
the Coming College 
Year. 

I am glad to accept the invitation of 
the Editor-in-Chief to give, through 
the Signal, a word of greeting to the 
old men who are returning, and one of 
welcome to the strangers within our 
gates. 

But, first of all, 1 war.t to congratu- 
late most heartily the board of editors 
of the Signal upon what seems to be a 
successful launching of the good ship 
Signal as a weekly publication. I 
have felt for some time that this move 
would be highly desirable, when feasi- 
ble, but have questioned whether the 
time had arrived when it could secure 
financial support; but thanks to the 
en-rgy and faith and practical sagacltv 
of the business management of the 
paper, the prospects seem bright for 
making the venture a practical success. 

To the new students we give the 
right hand of fellowsnip. The college 
is in a sense a brotherhood. New stu- 
dents enter, strangers to one another 
and to the college, without any reison 
for attachment to the institution; as a 
rule, when they leave, theyhr.ve madr 



FACULTY CHANGES 

Prof. William D. Hunt to Direct Short 

Courses. Other Important 

Changes. 

With the opening ot college several 
changes have been made In the Fac- 
ulty. Prof. William D. Hurd, of the 
University of Maine, has been elected 
director of short courses. He will 
have charge of the winter courses and 
the summer school of agriculture, and 
will also give a good deal of his time 
to work outside the college in lecturing 
and in helping to forward a general 
campaign for rural progress in Massa- 
chusetts. Professor Hurd is a native 
of Michigan and a graduate of the 
Michigan Agricultural College of the 
class cf 1899, from which institution he 
has also received the degree of Master 
of Agriculture. Since leaving college 
he has been constantly in touch w th 
agricultural work, and at the University 
of Maine organized its well equipped 
College of Agriculture. 

During the summer Dr. MacLaurtn 
resigned as research chemist at the 
Experiment station and lecturer in 
Organic Chemistry at the college. 
Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain has been 
elected associate professor of chemls- 



Capt. J. P. Blaney. 



Cristman, Clyde E. Dalton 

Curtis, Harold W. Belchertown 

Dayton, James W. 

Soutij lo-walk, Conn 



also reported. The backs were given 
work at receiving punts, with Scher- 
merhorn doing tie kicking. The line- 
men were engaged in starting and pass- 



Dohanian, Senekerimj/I. Somerville ing the ball. Vednesday afternoon 
Dooley, Thomas P. So. Boston ! Coach Gage of LVmmouth 1906 took 

Dowd, Daniel G. No. Amherst charge of the thrty candidates and 

Drury, Lewis Floyd Rutland j they advance so rtoidly that the next 

Edminster, Albert F. Jrcoklyn, N. Y. I day a short scrim ma^e was indulged in. 



Ellis, Benjamin W. 
Everson, Leon W. 
Fay, Robert S. 
Forbush, Wallace C. 
Freifeld, Joseph 
French, James D. 
Fuller, George 
Gaskill, Ralph H. 
Godvin, Thomas J. 
Goodnough, Henry E. 
Gore, Harold E. 



Plymouth It is still too early^o predict just how 

Bryantville the situation will turnout. Last year's 

Monson class took nearly hal the team with 

Rutland them, and many new Men will have to 

New Bedford! be developed. The lafc of a fullback 

Hyde Park and of a center is the ;rtatest weak- 

Deerfield ness. Schermerhorn, tlaney, Morse 

Worcester \ and Goodnough are kicjng well, and 

(Jamaica Plain forward passes are fairy numerous. 

Wiibraham The use of the tackling dy-nmy is be- 

Wollaston ing started. 



Greenleaf, William Fl Brockton The management was vev fortunate 
Griffin, William G. \. Hadley Falls in securing Jesse W. Gage, ,11-Ameri- 
Griggs, Frederick D. IChicopee Falls \ can guard of Dartmouth a coach. 
Guild, Louis F. I Swanton, Vt. Mr. Gage played four years iX Dart- 
Harrington, Louis F. I Taunton mouth, and since his gradu*on has 
Harris, Burton A. Wefsrsfield, Conn, coached one year for Volkman. school 

[Continued on p>| 7) 



[Continued on page 5.] 



friendships, and go out with a real ana 
abiding affection for the mother which 
had nursed them from boyhood into 
manhood. 

To the old students we extend the 
heartiest of greetings, and pledge our- 
self to every reasonable effort by which 
not only their careers here may be 
made richer and more profitable to 
themselves, but to the welfare and i 
honor of the college, and Its service to 
the Commonwealth enriched and en- 
hanced. 

The editcr has also asked me to 
give a "watchword" for the year. Ij 
have chosen the phrase that stands at ■ 
the head of this article. The words! 
\ are well known, aud they may be made 
full of meaning to this college com- 
munity. They mean that each man, 
each student, new or old, and each 
officer of the Institution will have some 
unselfish purpose looking to the better- 
ment of all. They mean enthusiasm, 
the spirit of co-operation, bard work, 
the abolition of "knocking," and 
mutual sympathy between students and 
faculty. So let each man "lendai 
hand" to help make the most success- 1 
fui college year in our history— in class 
room work, in athletics, in student ac- 
tivities, and in building up, in fine, 
"a bigger, a busier and a better 
M. A. C," 

Kenyon L. Butterfield. 

The student body attended the 
Hampshire Fair this afternoon. 



place of three assistantships. Dr. 
Chamberlain is a son of Dr. W. I . 
Chamcerlain, formerly president of the 
Iowa State Agricultural College, ano 
is a graduate of the same college In 
1890, from which he has since re- 
ceived his master's degree. In 1899 
Dr. Chamberlain received from Johns 
Hopkins University the degree of doc- 
tor of philosophy, and has since held 
several high positions In agricultural 
chemis'ry. The authorities of the 
college believe that they have secured 
a man particularly well equipped to 
hip in building up the extremely Im- 
portant department o f chemistry. 

Mr. Fred B. McKay, of Ann Arbor. 
Mich., has been elected Instructor in 
English and public speaking. Mr. 
McKay graduated from the Normal 
College of Michigan a few years ago, 
and has been doing advanced work at 
the University of Michigan, where he 
also acted as assistant in the depart- 
ment of oratory. 

Mr. John Noyes, '09. is to be the 
assistant in landscape gardening and 
drawing. 

Prof. E. K Eyerly, Franklin and 
Marshall '88, will occupy the chair of 
assistant professor of political science 
and lecturer in rural sociology, made 
vacant by the resignation of Prof. 
George N. Holcomb. Prof. Eyerlv 
has studied at the Yal« Divinity School. 
at the University of Berlin and at the 



\ 



[Continued on page 4.) 



35828 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 21, 1 



909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. Editor-in 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. Asst. 

HENRY A. BROOKS, 1910, College 

LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic 

JOSIAH C FOLSOM, 1910. A.um.ii 

EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911. Department 
HERBERT W BLANEY. 1911, College 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 



-Chief. 
Editor. 
Notes. 
Notes. 
Notes. 
Notes. 
Notes. 



E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE, 1912. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Po« Office. 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, SEPT. 21. No. 1 



The Sicnal Board is treading on 
new ground. Their efforts will only 
be successful by hard work and the 
very best help from the student body. 
It is easier to criticise than one 
realizes and this is where the student 
body can help in refraining from it. 
We ask you to remember just this one 
thing and make allowances until our 
system gets well under way. In the 
past there were editors who did the 
work almost alone but you will see 
under the new circumstances that one 
man cannot obtain the necessary news. 
We must have reporters from every 
class in college and the men on the 
staff will nave to be on meir joOs at ail 
times. Besides this we ask the help 
of the alumni in getting news. Send 
In every thing that will be of interest. 
On this occasion we also wish to thank 
the faculty for their support in our 
former efforts and again ask their 
assistance. At the very start we want 
you to know that our policy is *'to 
work for the best interests of the stu- 
dents and alumni of old M. A, C." 



The Signal wishes to express its 
sorrow at the resignation of Dr. R. D. 
MacLaurin. His loss will be deeply 
felt both as teacher and friend. The 
kindly services rendered by him can 
only be appreciated by our expression 
of good wishes for success wherever 
his paths may lead. 



The football outlook seems to be 
bright in spite of the fact that 1909 
literally cut the team in two. While 
there seems to be a notable lack of 
line men we feel sure that this 
deficiency can be overcome and a 
very creditable team turned out. The 
Signal wishes to congratulate the 
management on its schedule and also 
upon its good fortune to obtain Mr. 
Gage as coach of the squad. The 
appearance of a large squad for practise 
is a very gratifying showing that the 
spirit is right. Lets keep it up if we 
cannot play ourselves, we can be on 
the side lines cheering the team to 
victory. 



"Lend a Hand" that is a good 

watchword. To make that motto good 

we must truly live up to it in spirit, 

deed and word. It includes us all, 

bars none, student, alumni, faculty, 

we all must take it. To the upper 

classes, we must play the freshmen 

and faculty square, the former have 

us as an example and are now receiv- ,,..,. 

.„ , ,. 1 his Store was established in 

ing the impressions that will last all 

through their college career and may 
be life, the latter must have our 
reverence, respect and best work. To 
the faculty you too have your part in 
this little world and it extends far out- 
side of the realm of books. We are 
men like yourselves and hope always 
to meet you on that basis. We truly 
both need to "Lend a Hand." And 
freshmen last but by a good deal not 
least, with our hearty welcome we too 
ask your co-operation. Your world 
lies before you, do what you can and 
by so doing you give that which will 
place and keep the standards of our 
Alma Mater on a still higher level. 



RELIABLE FOOTWEAR 



In deciding where to buy your footwear while in town 



choose 

THE SHOE STORE THAT ALWAYS MAKES GOOD 

854 and has beet under the present manager 
merit nearly 19 years. It has always been a favorite place for M. A. C. Men 
to trade. We carry in stock the ELITE SHOE, $3.50 to $5.00, WHIT- 
MAN & KEITH SHOES $400 to $5.00. LJPHAM BROS SHOES 
$5.00 to $6.00, W. L. DOUGLAS SHOE $2.50 to $.400. 
TASCO the best $3.00 Shoe made. RUBBERS, TENNIS and 

SPORTING SHOES. REPAIRING. Very best workmaanahfp and ma- 
terials. 



JAMES F. PAGE 



Next to Post ( >i 1 u:i 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Sept. 22 — 1-15 p. m. Student mass 

meeting in the Chapel. 
Sept. 23—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. 

in Chapel. Charles H. 

White, leader. 
Sept. 26— 9-15 a. m. In Chapel Y. 

M. C. A. Rally. 

FRESHMAN CLASS ENTER. 
TAINED 

TH« FrtihriTTi C ■ wmtm th« z'"* e -*" 
of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, assisted by the Faculty and 
their wives, from eight until ten o'clock 
on Friday evening. It was the first 
opportunity offered to meet the new 
men and also to renew the associations 
interrupted by the vacation. A hun- 
dred and twenty-eight were present. 
The reception was held during the first 
hour and later all joined in singing the 
college songs. Mr. L. S. McLaine 
led the cheer which brought the eve- 
ning to a close. The next evening, 
Saturday, at half past six a college 
sing was held in the Social Union 
Rooms. Songs were song with ac- 
companiment on the piano by Mr. 
Cleveland '13. W. E. Leonard '10, 
President of the Senate, conducted the 
program and welcomed the Freshman 
Class to its privileges. The various 
college organizations were introduced 
and also the plans for the coming 
year. There is an especially active 
movement being made this year to get 
the new men interested in these organ- 
izations and they were urged to select 
some line of work whether athletics, 
literary, musical or religious and go 
into it at once. 

The program of the evening was as 
follows : 

Welcome to the Freshmen, W. E. Leonard, 

MO. 
Musical Association. R. A Waldron '10, 
Y. M. C. A.. F. T. Haynes '10. 
Pianoforte Solo. W. A. Cleveland '13. 
M. A. C. Spirit. H. W. Blaney '11. 
Reading, A H. Sharpe Ml. 
Athletics. J. P. Blaney MO. 
" Looking Forward," L. S McLaine MO. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 




KODAKS 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <& SHOE 
REPAIRING 

ST" AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

Open 3'om 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All ki .Is of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

R. LEVI N E 

j 1 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



THURBER'S 

NKXt To-I'OST-OFFICB 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



AND 



BROWNIES 

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES 

Be sure you get an 

EASTHAN FILH 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



& GOWNS 

To the Amei can Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the tacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 




Deuel s Drug Slue 




COILECI 

AMHERST 



barber shop 



HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September it, 1909. 



There are seven good reasons 



why YOU should buy 



COAL 



OK 



C. R. ELDER 



FELLOWS! 

FOR YOUR 
SUPPLIES, CANDY, 
TONIC, etc. 

VISIT THE 

Aggie 
Store 

Basement of North College 



E. FRANK C0E FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Yearn the Standard of Kxeellcnce. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Permian Guano Base 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(liasic Slag Phosphate.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric 
Acid and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, %% Pure 

POTASH SALTS. 

Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if 
you mention the College Signal. 



THE COE-iRTlHl CO. 

24 26 Stone Street, NEW YORK. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The annual Rope Pull is indefinitely 
postponed until water can be had in 
the pond. 

The College Senate have appointed 
L. S. McLaine, '10, and E. F. 
Damon, '10, as cheer leaders for the 
year. 

Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck will take up 
his work at Yale on Sept. 30, 1909. 
He will continue his graduate work in 
Physics for one year. 

At the Assembly on Sunday Presi- 
dent Butterfield spoke on the "Appeals 
to Young Men." The talk was con- 
fined to the sides of life that fitted the 
college man. 

Charles H. White, '09, has been 
appointed graduate secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. and will also act as Field 
Agent for the college, giving lectures 
at high schools, farmers' clubs, etc. 

At a meeting of the freshman class 
on the opening day of college the fol- 
lowing elections were made : Presi- 
dent pro tern, Anderson; class cap- 
tain, Hayden ; cheer leader, Gore; 
captain of baseball, Ellis. 

The annual students handbook of 
the college has been issued with the 
compliments of the Y. M. C. A. The 
book is dedicated to Prof. William R. 
Hart and was edited by Damon, '10, 
Folsorn, '10, Cabot '12, Pratt '12. 

New fellows will find a very cordial 
welcome at ilic Sapr.oi chutch 
Pleasant street at the right of the 
common going south. Sunday ser- 
vices are as follows : preaching 10-45. 
Bible School at 12, Y. P. S. C. E., 
6-30, preaching 7-30. 

A temporary flag pole has been 
raised upoh the drill hall and the flag 
will be displayed every day from 8 A. 
m. until 5-30 p. m. The flag is a gift 
of Hon. A. G. Pollard of Lowell, 
Trustee of the college. The gift is 
certainly appreciated by the students 
who see it every day. 

The peace and quiet of early Sun- 
day morning was broken by loud 
cheers for 1913. The class picture 
was successfully taken on the chapel 
steps. The only interference con- 
sisted of five sophomores but these 
difficulties were soon overcome and a 
quick get away resulted. 

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE SATUR- 
DAY SEPT. 25, 1909 

Univ. of Maine vs. M. A. C. at 
Orono, Me. 

Bowdoin vs. Boston College at Bruns- 
wick, Me. 

Brown vs. N. H. State, at Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Holy Cross vs. Norwich at Worcester. 

Rens. Poly. I. vs. Williams at Wii- 
liamstown. 

Hamilton vs. Syracuse at Syracuse. 

Union Univ. vs. Fitz-ClarKe at Jack- 
son. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



An arre < >f tillage land 8 indies deep, weighs 
1000 tons. An average dressing of high grade fertil- 
izer when no manure or green crop is plowed in, is 
1000 lbs., or one pound of fertilizer to a ton of soil — 
(riving less than half a grain of actual plant food to 
each pound of soil. You have seen the wonderful 
results yielded by this infinitesimal application. 
What is the reason? 

Study the pliuit food problem. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

4.? CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 

Asylum, an.d High Streets, Hartford, Conn- 

One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Hushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkr S. Garde. 



C&rp*rvter St Morehous*, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 21, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tnesday, September, at, 1909. 



WHAT ABOUT 



THAT FALL SUI 



If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, i<S oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $'2.50 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $11.50 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $10.00 

hlack unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Rlue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting. 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Rain Cloth, - $3.50 per yd. Trouserings, - $3-5° P" vard . 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

(f^ ' Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



witb a full line of College Supplies 



may be found at 



EWELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins 5octs. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates tcts. pieces 50c ts. 

6 " dates 3Ct. pieces 50cts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25Cts. 

25 " Hroken Hank and Confederate 

Bills $ 1. 00 

Scnil for my Monthly Mail Auction Circulars ami 
Selling price list. 



M. I), (ill. MAN. C. A. MOKKKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to ill Main Stukbt. 

Worcester, Mass. 



COX SONS 

AND 

VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 




HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numiriimitist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST. BOSTON. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



RECENT REPAIRS 

The Dean's Offices in South College 
have been refitted and decorated, the 
entrance is made through the east 
entry. The Drill Hall ceiling has 
been lowered and when finished the 
whole interior will be painted white. 
A protecting frame work has been built 
around the steam pipes. Connected 
with the gun shed, five new baths have 
been installed and complete toilets 
throughout. The gun shed is being 
fitted for gallery practice by the putting 
in of new sky lights and a new ceiling. 
Two hundred lockers for the use of the 
students will also be installed. 

There are being installed in the 
heating plant a new Curtis dynamo 
and turbine, a 100 K. W. machine, 
and also a new 50 K. W. machine of 
Westinghouse make, connected with a 
Terry turbine. These added machines 
will furnish the necessary electric light 
and power for all the college needs. 
A new extension to our heating plant 
is being installed for the purpose of 
heating the new entomological building 
and of furnishing the necessary addi- 
tion of heat to Clark and Wilder Halls. 

The rooms in North College have 
been painted in a new flat tone, the 
old porch has been removed and a new 
and attractive entrance, designed by 
James H. Ritche, has been built. In 
the basement the toilet and bath rooms 
have been plastered, and the game 
room on the east side will be fitted up 
with hardwood floors, arcu windows 
and paneled wainscotting. 150 new 
chairs have been placed in the Chapel, 
which Is to be redecorated. All the 
buildings on the campus have been 
furnished with chemical fire extinguish- 
ers, and a new fire alarm installed at 
Wilder Hall. Two huudred and fifty 
feet of tar walks have been repaired. 
Draper Hall has been painted and the 
entrances have been fixed up. Pro- 
fessor Neal's office is being repaired 
and redecorated. The room off the 
Registrar's office has been fitted up 
and will be occupied by Professors 
MacKimmie and Ashley. The Exper- 
iment Station and Horticultural Barns 
have been slated, the vegetable pack- 
ing house has been changed and made 
more available. A waiting room on 
the car line will be constructed in the 
near future. The new barns are near 
completion and the repairs on the 
horse barn have made that building 
very much more useful. The con- 
tract for the new entomological build- 
ing was let to Allen Bros, of Amherst 
on Aug. 2, the building is well under- 
way and will be completed oy June 1, 
1910. 




fStjuTi 



i 



v 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 
know that their shoes are 

right. 
Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOKMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Hlock 
Amherst, Mass. 



^E. N. PARISEAU,.* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON 



FACULTY CHANGES 

[Continued from first page.] 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 



Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



University of Chicago. He has taught 
at Redfield College, Dakota ; in Yank- 
ton College, Dakota, and in the South 
Dakota Agricultural College. 



F. H. WARREN 
<£ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 




THOMPSON 

SPORTING GOODS 

STORE 
and REPAIR SHOP. 

Rear First Nat. Bank, 



TYPEWRITERS 



For Sale or Rent. 



TENNIS GOODS 



FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 



GUNS and AMMUNITION 



HOCKEY SKATES and 



STICKS 



SNOW SHOES and 



SKIS. 



E. A. Thompson 



FOOTBALL OUTLOOK 

[Continued from first page] 

of Boston, and two years for Dart- 
mouth. C. W. Lewis. Massachusetts 
'05, is assisting in coaching the back- 
field. The coaches are hampered 
somewhat by the fact that the first 
game comes so soon. Following is 
the schedule: 

Sept. 25 University of Maine at Orono. Me. 

Sept. 29. Dartmouth at Hanover. N. H. 

Oct 2. Union at Schenectady. N Y. 

Oct. 9. Norwich University at Amherst. 

Oct. 16. Worcester Polytechnical Institute 
at Amherst. 

Williams at Williamstown. 

Brown at Providence. R. 1. 

New Hampshire at Manchester. 

Springfield Training School, 
Springfield. 

— at Amherst. Pending. 

About forty men comprise the squad. 
They are, in addition to the men al- 
ready menttor.od, Hosmer '10 and 
Roberts '12. both l M" men, Cowle.s 
'10, Nickless '10, Partridge '10, Bai- 
ley '10, Haywood '10, McGraw'll. 
Bursley II. Pauley 'II, Moreiu '12, 
McGarr '12. Eisenhaure '12, Lloyd 
'12, Maxon '12, Carpenter '12, Clapp 
'12, Tower '12, Lew '12, Baker '13, 
Putnam '13, Goodnough '13, Griffin 
'13, Gore '13, Howe. '13, Powers '13, 
Brewer '13, Hayden '13, Lane 13, 
Ames '13, O'Brien '13. and Harring- 
ton '13. 



Oct. 23. 
Oct 30. 
Nov. 6 
Nov. 13. 

Nov. 20. 



FOOTBALL RULES CHANGED. 

The football rules this year are only 
slightly different from last year's. 
Two or three important amendments 
have been made. The most impor- 
tant of these was that reducing the 
number of points for a goal from the 
field from four to thtee. This will 
make two field goals equal in value to 
one touchdown and goal, a thing which 
has long been sought for by many foot- 
ball enthusiasts. With this change it 
will be more difficult for a team with 
a good kicker to defeat a strong team 
by scoring goals from the field. 

Another change provides that in case 

a team incurs two penalties in the same 

play, the offended team shall have the 

J right to choose which penalty shall be 

inflected. 

A rather important change was made 
in the rules governing touchbacks. 
Next season a team making a touch- 
back will be allowed two rushes before 
being compelled to kick. The object 
of this change was to lessen the great 
difficulties which a team labored under 
when near their own goal line. 

Among other new rules was one im- 
posing a penalty of five yards on a 
team whose center makes a feint of 
passing the ball in order to deceive his 
opponent, and one providing that no 
penalty can carry the ball over the goal 
line either for a safety or a touchdown. 
The other changes m?.de are mainly 
slight amendments clarifying the old 
rules. 



T. Iv. F»AIC." 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Repair Work. 



REAR OF AMHE.R3T HOUSE! 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for Af. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Presser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to he Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Kent. 

Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Iiarly and get Satisfaction. 
Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

("lass Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 
.ind Class 
Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 91, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September it, 1909. 



7 




GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE: BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



SENATE RULES 



.•.•.•.•..•.•.•.•.•.••••••■•'•'•'• 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

I'ine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM FITTING, 1 .1, ■phone 59-4- 

(i.\s PIT1 ING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Block, AMHERST, Mas-. 

Cut flowers always on hand. 

ivleplione or call. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.O.S. 

ois:vr.vr, rooms 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Ol-lh I IIiHKS: 

etol8A«Mtl*0OtoSP*M a 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gal admin 
stered when desired 



A specialty <>f Repairing 

Church Windows, 
MEMORIAL Windows, 
Lkad Liohts, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



1 . As a mark of respect all stu- 
dents are expected to recognize the 
members of the faculty by the military 
salute. 

2. That, in addition, the members 
of the Freshmen class shall when on 
the college grounds recognize the 
members of the Senior class in the 
same manner. 

3. Freshmen shall not be permitted 
to smoke on the college grounds save 
in their own rooms until they have 
defeated the Sophomores in some 
regular, athletic contest. 

4. Students are expected to dress 
neatly and decently at all times and no 
student shall be permitted to appear 
on the campus during an atr letic con- 
test, or at the Dining Hali or at any 
college exercise clad in overalls, jum- 
pers or similar unconventional attire. 

5. Military uniforms or portions of 
the sane shall not be worn, by individ- 
uals, outside the college grounds, 
except to or from drill. 

6. Should the Freshman class 
lose the Tug-of War the Sophomore 
class shall be at liberty to confiscate 
all Freshman class banner displayed 
by that class either in their rooms or 
on the campus during their Freshman 
year at college. 

7. No student shall wear any pre- 
paratory school letters or numerals 
either on caps, jerseys or sweaters 
while on the campus. 

8. The Freshman clacs banquet 
shall be held on or between April 19 
and June 1. The Sophomores shall 
create no disturbance in another town, 
wnile trying to break up the banquet. 
A breach of peace shall be considered 
a disturbance. If the Sophomores 
prevent the Freshman class president 
or any other three class officers from 
attending the banquet, it shall not be 
considered successful. 

The Freshman class must give a 
sealed list of the names of their class 
officers to the president of the Senate 
to be opened in presence of the Senate. 
This list must be handed in before 
April 19. 

9. Between Sept. 20 and Christ- 
mas vacation inclusive, Freshmen 
shall appear at all times while in the 
limits of the town of Amherst, wearing 
the prescribed Freshman cap. The 
said cap shall consist of a black skull 
cap with a \\ inch green button. 

Wm. E. Leonard, Pres. 

A. P. Bursley, Sec. 



ference, or monthly meetings of stu- 
dents in elective English, in the course 
of the fall and winter. Among these 
will be Mr. Herbert Collingwood, edi- 
tor of The Rural New Yorker, and 
Mr. Gilbert Tucker, of the editoral staff 
of The Country Gentlemen. These two 
will speaK on topics in agricultural 
journalism. Gen. Charles Taylor, of 
The Boston Globe, has also notified 
Professor Neal that he will speak be- 
fore the Conference. The Department 
expects to secure other speakers to dis- 
cuss non- professional and literary sub- 
jects. 




Insurance on Students' 
Furniture, Etc, $1.00 per 
$100. for 3 years while in any 
College or private building. 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-13. 



W. R. BROWN 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH. 

The rooms occupied by Professor 
Neal in the tower, South College, are 
being altered to serve as offices and 
work-room. The repairs wili be com- 
pleted by October I. Mr. McKay, 
the instructor in English and public 
speaking, will make his office in the 
same suite. 

Several notable speakers are ex- 
pected to talk before the English Con- 



An arrangement has been made by 
which articles prepared by the class In 
agricultural journalism may be sub- 
mitted to the editors of certain agricul- 
tural papers for criticism. An arrange- 
ment has also been made with one of 
these papers under which it will accept 
and publish such articles as are of suf- 
ficient merit. 

The appointment of an additional 
member of the Department — Mr. 
Fred B. McKay, instructor in English 
and public speaking— makes it possible 
to give a choice of work in sophomore 
English. Students who are required 
to take English 3 a and 4 a (the 2-hour 
courses) must take not less than half 
their work in composition. Except for 
this restriction, either theme-writing 
or public speaking, or both, may be 
taken; and 1-hour students may take 
double work In the first semester, thus 
earning exemption from English in 
semester 2. In the theme-writing 
courses, the papers are to be any re- 
port, story, or article suitable for pub- 
lication in anv department of a news- 
paper, a magazine, or an agricultural 
paper. Before the themes are re- 
turned to the writers, they will be sub- 
mitted to the editors in the journalism 
classes, who will endeavor to get ma- 
terial for the class papers from this 
source. 

Mr. Charles R. Green, the Libra- 
rian, will give five lectures on the use 
of the library, the catalogs, etc. The 
lectures will be given in connection 
with the regular sophomore courses, 
and will be supplimented with library 
exercises. 



LIBRARY. 

Prof. W. B. P. Lockwood has re- 
cently given to the library a copy of 
his thesis entitled The Manufacture of 
unsweetened Condensed Milk. This 
thesis was recently presented to and 
'•■ accepted by the faculty of the Pennsyl- 
vania State College for the degree of 
Master of Science conferred upon 
1 Professor Lockwood last June. 

Mrs. Mary E. Williams, 2 College 
street, Amherst, gave to the library 
'. during the summer nearly 200 volumes 
! among which were several fine edi- 
tions of works on history and literature. 
' Her gift will be very much appreciated 
by the students. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses. 
carnations, violets and chysantheiiuims 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE 300. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

[Continued from first page. J 



Hayden, William V. 
Hasey, Willard H. 
Hatch, Herbert T. 
Headle, Herbert W. 
Headle, Marshall 
Heath, Chester B. 
Helberg, Henry W. 
Holden, James L. 
Howe, Glover E. 
Howe, R. W. 
Hubbard, Roswell E. 
Huntington, Samuel P. 
Hyland, Harold W. 
Jenks, Harold E. 
Jenney, Herbert H. 
Jones, Harold F. 



Beverly 
Brockton 
Norwell 
Bolton J 
Bolton ' 
Needham 
Lawrence 
Palmer 
Marlboro 
East Dover, Vt. 
Hatfield 
Lynn 
Weymouth 
Worcester 
So. Boston 
Campello 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the AMHERST 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



Jordon. S. M. Rutherford, N. J. 

Kelley, Bt rnard J. Harwich 

Kenney, Frederick A. Charlestown 
Kinney, Warren C. West Bridgewater 
Lake, James E. Fall River 

Larsen Nils P. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Lesure, John W. Lunenburg 

Little, Willard S. Newburyport 

Lyon, Harold Somerville 

Macone, Joseph A. Ccncord 

Mallett, George A. Bridgeport, Conn. 
Marsh, Frank E. Jefferson 

Matz. Julius Boston 

Mayer, John L. So. Boston 

McDougall, Allister F. Westford 

Milbury, Freeman C. Lynn 

Miller, Harold H'. Needham 

Moir, William S. Boston 

Neal, Ralph T. Mattapan 

Nichols, Norman J. Everett 

O'Brien, James L. Wayland 

Parsons, Robert Lynn 

Patch, Roy K. Beverly 

Pease, Lester N. Meriden, Conn. 

Pellett, John D. Worcester 

Peters, Thomas H. North Truro 

Pierce, H. W. Somerville 

Pillsbury, Joseph J. West Bridgewater 
Pist, George A. Richmond Hill, N.Y. 
Prouty, Roy H. Worcester 

Putnam. Earl F. Easthampton 

Quinn, Joseph H. Boston 

Roehrs, Herman T. New York, N. Y. 
Rosebrooks, Walker E. Oxford 

Ryder, Harold W. East Boston 

Serex, Paul, Jr. Jamaica Plain 

Shea, John L. Amherst 

Shute, Carl A. Clayton, III. 

Smart, Herbert L. Framingham 

Staab, Harold B. Northampton 

Strong, Sheldon H. So. Hadley Falls 
Thayer, Clark L. Enfield 

Tucker, Walter G. Lynn 

Tupper, Arthur S., Jamaica Plain 

Turner, Leon B. No. Abington 

Van Zwaluwenburg, Ryer H. 

Rutherford, N.J. 
Walker, Charles D. Greenwich Village 
Wheeler, Henry L. Salem 

Wheeler, Merrill H. Rutland 

Whitman, Warren C. Abington 

Whitney, Francis W. Needham 

Zabriskie, George 2nd 

Rutherford, N. J. 



Henry V. DeMott. Metuchen, N. J. South Hadley. Mr. Baker Is now a 
William A. Greene, Elmwood government meat inspector at Wheel- 

Miss Helen Granger. Amherst ing, Va. Mis. Baker is a sister of 

Arthur A. Hammond, l.oroy Smith, '02. 

Bridgeport, Conn. '00. The July Journal 0/ Industrial 

Guy C. Hawkins, Lancaster ; (Wl j Engineering Chemistry had an 

Richard H. Powers, Maiden article by J. E. Halligan on "American 

♦ Molasses Feeds: These Manufacture 

ALUMNI NOTES and Composition." 

During the summer, blanks have '00. J. W. Kellogg attended the 

been sent out from President Butter- meeting of the A. O. A. C. at Denver, 

field's office to the alumni to secure Colo., in August. 

information concerning the college's | -qq Dr. A. W. Morrill has been 

graduates and to get in touch with 
them. Between four and five hun- 
dred blanks have been filled out and 
returned. President Butterfield is 
much gratified with the promptness of 
these returns. He desires that all 
blanks not yet returned be sent in at 
once. Many alumni have expressed 
their enthusiastic approval of the plan. 
Make it a success. 

77, — J, K. Mills has presented the 
college library " Indexes," very desir- 
able photos of college buildings and 
views of the grounds, and a number 
of photographer's periodicals. 

'87, '91. '09. — F. H. Fowler 
resigned in July as head clerk in th 
office of the secretary of agriculture 
at the State House, Boston. Howard 
M. Legate, who for several years has 
been second clerk, became first clerk, 
and Herbert L. White, '09, succeeded 
him. Mr. Fowler became clerk to 
the superintendant of the Industrial 
School for Boys recently established at 
Shirley, 

'89. — Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Crocker 
visited college lately. 

'90. — George B. Simonds died 
July 19 of diabetes. 

•91._-W. C. Paige, 725 4th Ave., 
Louisville, Ky., has resigned as Gen- 
eral Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. at 
New Albany, Ind. and becomes assist- 
ant State Secretary of the Kentucky 
Y. M. C. A. with headquarters at 
Louisville. 

•93. — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Baker 
of North Grosvenor Dale, Conn., 
accompanied by Mrs, Baker's mother, 
visited college Sept. 1 1 . 

>95.__G. A. Billings of the Depart- 
ment of Plant Industry at Washington 
is at a hospital at Fond du Lac, Wis., 
seriously ill with typhoid fever. His 
work is investigation of farm conditions. 

•95. — a. B. Smith of Chicago 
attended the 250- year celebration at 
Hadley, this summer, and visited 
college. 

'98. — Samuel W. Wiley, home 
address, Ruxton,Md., business address, 
Lobe Building, 15 South Gay St., 
Baltimore, Md. The firm of which ; college to 
he is a member has taken over the Entomology. 



appointed State Entomologist for 
Arizona. 

'02.— On Oct. I, H. J, Franklin is 
to take charge of cranberry investiga- 
tions at the Massachusetts sub-station 
at Wareham. 

"03.- -C. I. Lewis, located at the 
Oregon Agricultural Col.ege, Corvallis, 
Ore., Is seriously ill with nervous pros- 
tration. 

'04. — E. A. Bach is now in Florida 
working on the white lly. He wiil 
return to Amherst soon. 

'06. H. M. Russell is now in Cal- 
ifornia, studying, under the direction 
of the Depaitment of Agriculture, 
insects attacking sugar beets. 

'06. — C. F. Pray worked at the 

Experiment Station here this summer- 

'07. Born, Aug. 22, to Mr. and 

Mrs. E. G. Bartlett, a daughter. 

Gladys Marion. 

'07. — W. E. Dickinson is night 
superintendent of the Sugar Making 
Department., Sacnrn. erto V»Wty Sugtr 
Co., Hamilton City, Cal. 

'08.- -K. F. Anderson is a teacher 
at the Flint Medical College. New 
Orleans, La. He attended the 1909 
Harvard Summer School, and vis- 
ited M. A. C. 

'08. E. W. Bailey, Sigma Xi, 
University of Illinois, 1909, becomes 
assistant in Plant Breeding at the 
University of Illinois. 

'08.— G. R. Cobb is assistant in 
Horticulture at Rhode Island State 
College. He is in charge of Physi- 
cal Culture and is coaching the varsity 
football this fall. 

'08.— C. B. Dolan is Dairy Super- 
intendent at the Industrial School for 
Boys at Shirley. 

'08. — F. L. Edwards is farming at 

West Hanover, Address, Rockland, 

'08.— Married, Aug. 31, W. L. 

Howe of Marlboro to E. Mildred 



Walker. 

'08.— T. 
Bureau of 
ton, D. C. 

'08.— J. 



H. Jones is with the 
Entomology at Washing- 

R. Parker has returned to 
take advanced work in 



Unclassified. 

Harold B. Barstow, Hadley 

Edward Russell, Watertown 



whole top floor of a large office build- '08.— D. P. Miller, 150 Broadway, 
ing and has one the largest chemical New York, with the American Nursery 
laboratories south of New York. The Co. as office manager, 
business is analysis of fertilizers, water, '08. — F. C. Thurston is assistant 
milk, coal, coke, paints, foods, etc. | chemistfor E. Atkins & Co. of 10 Broad 
'00.— Married, Sept. 11, Howard St. , Boston at their sugar estate at 
Baker and Miss Bertha E. Smith, at ' Soledad, Cuba. 
I i 






I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 21, 1909. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 



'08.— S. J. Wright, Manager, Stan- 
nox Farm, Sherborn. 

'09.— C. W. Hooker, Ph. D., '09, Statistics of it* growth. 1898 to 1908 

is conducting investigations for the U. |, Total Receipts: From 1898 to 1908 there was a steady increase in the total re- 

S. Bureau of Entomology concerning ceipts of the College. In the first five years of this period, they increased about 



cranberry insects. His headquarters 
are at Cranmore, Wis. 

A partial list of the class of 1909, 
their addresses and occupations are as 
follows : 

Alger, P. E., with the Amherst 
& Sunderland Street Railway, Amherst. 

Barlow, W. D. t Yale Forestry 
School. After about Sept. 29, his 
address will be 58 Lake Piace, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Barnes. B. F., Jr., Haverhill, 
Farming. 

Bartlett, O. C, Ipswich, Box 111. 
Entomological work on the Rice 
estate at Ipswich during the summer. 
He will return to M. A. C. for post- 
graduate work in Entomology. 

Briggs, O. B., gave the college 
library a large number of Indexes this 
summer. 

Brown, G. M., Jr., is canvassing 
near Greenwood. 

Caffrey, D. J., will return for grad- 
uate work in entomology. 

Cardin, P. P., Estacion Agronom- 
ica, Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. 
Chief of Department of Vegetable 
Pathology and Entomology, Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Santiago, 
Cuba. 

Chase, E. I,, 26 Chapman St., 
Greenfield. With Boston &. Maine 
R. R., Engineering Department. 

Codding, G. M., 10 Philips Place, 
Montreal, P. Q. With Frederick G. 
Todd, Landscape Architect. 

Crosby, H. P., Lenox. 

Crossman, S. S., with the Gypsy 
Moth Parasite Laboratory in Melrose 
Highlands. He will soon join the 
Bureau of Entomology at Washington, 
D. C. 

Hathaway, E. F.,97 Huron Ave., 
Cambridge, Mass. With C. F. Hath- 
away & Son, Wholesale Bakers. 

Ingalls, D. F., Cheshire. 

Knight, H. 0., 419 Porter Ave., 
Buffalo, N. Y. Foreman, Great 
Bear Spring Co. 

Lindblad, R. C, with N. Y. C. R. 
R. Signal Department. 

McGown, G. E. , Walnut Hill, Me. 
Farming. 

Neale, H. J., 193 Lincoln St., 
Worcester, with City of Worcester 
Park Department as Civil Engineer. 

Noyes, J., assistant in Landscape 
Gardening, M. A. C, 

Oliver, J. T., 473 Adams St., 
Dorchester. 

Phelps, H. D., 122 Willow St., 
Minneapolis, Minn. With Minneapo- 
lis Park Commission Forestry Depart 
ment. 

Potter, R. C,, has been assistant at 
the Emerson Laboratory, Boston, dur- 
ing the summer. 

Putnam, C. S., Turner Center, Me. 
Teacher of Science and Agriculture, 
Leavitt Institute. 



35%, and in the latter five years, nearly 45% more, making a total of approximately 
80% in the ten years. 

2. Inventory of Buildings: From 1X98 to 1903 the value of the College buildings 
increased about 30%; during tlie five years which followed, the increase was over 

60%. 

3. Total Inventory: The increase in total inventory, including land, buildings, and 
equipment, was not especially great, there being an increase of 42% from 1898 to 
1903, sad an additional increase from 1903 to 1908, of 43%, 

4. Number of Instructors: The teaching force of the College increased 55% in this 
decade, the additions to the faculty coining gradually during the period. 

5. Number of Four-years' Students: The annual increase in number of regular 
students from 1898 to 1903 was slightly over 8%; the annual increase for the following 
five years was between 22% and 23%, the total increase being 158%. 

6. Total Enrolment: Under this head the most striking indication of the growth 
of the Institution is noted. In 1903 tlu: total enrolment had increaesd 60% over 
that of five years previous. From 1903 to 1908 there was an increased attendance 
°f 355%. making a total increase in all departments of the College 415% f° r the 
ten year period. 

SUMMARY. 

Approximate Percent of Increase. 





1898- 


'9°3 


1003- 


190S 


1898-1908 


Total Receipts 


35 




45 




80 


Inventory of BuOdinga 


3° 




60 




90 


Total Inventory 


42 




43 




«5 


Number of Instructors 


3° 




25 




55 


Number of Four-years' Students 


43 




"5 




158 


Total Enrolment 


60 




355 




4>5 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Tennis Association, 



William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

R. H. Allen, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

, President 

L S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 



Smulyan, M. T., vith J. K. Shaw, 
Division of Horticulture, M. A. C, 
engaged in Experiment Station work 
in Plant Breeding. 

Thompson, M. W., New Haven, 
Conn., Yale Forestry School. 

Warner, F. Gatun, Canal Zone, 
Panama. Civil Engineer with the 
Municipal Engineering Division of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission. 

Waters, T. C, post-graduate work 
at M. A. C. 

Webb, C. R., Box 999, Orange, 
N. J. With F. A. Cutter Co., For- 
estry and Landscape Gardening. 

White, C. H., Amherst. Field 
Agent for M. A. C. and General Sec- 
retary Y. M. C. A. 

White, H. L., second clerk, office 
of Secretary of Agriculture, State 
House, Boston. 

Wilson, F. H., Jr.. Nahant. 
Floriculture. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner scat. 



for 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Jacob Reed's; Sons, 

1424- 1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUKACTL'KKKS OF 



UNI FORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of n first class order. 

Electrical Massage 



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COLLEGE PRESSING 
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BEST of Cliambimg, Pressing, 
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TICKET SYSTEM 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol.. XX. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 28, 1909. 



No. 2 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. LSW and C. K. ROBERTS. 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 



■J 

f° ules of Signal Board Explained. 



SOPHS WIN ROPE PULL M.A.C.O. UNIV. OF MAINE DARTMOUTH AND UNION 



As- 1912 Takes Thirty Feet of Rope in the The First Game of the Season Result. A Hard Week'. Work for the Team 



to 

CO 



signment. to be Given Out 
This Week. 



* 



Six Man Pull. Juniors Ob- 
serve Day. 

Membership to the Signal Board Is The regular six-man tug-of-war 
gained by competition only, based upon between the lower classes was held 



the character and amount of work ac- 
complished by the contestants. Com- 
petition is open from April 1 to March 1 



last Wednesday, the Sophomores win 

nlng easily with 31 feet to their credit. 

They had practically the same team 



and at the end of that time one mem- j as last year, consisting of Eisenhaure, 
ber of the Junior class, two of the captain and anchor, Pierpont, Brett, 
Sophomore class and two of Ue Fresh- 1 Parker, Robinson and Sanctuary. 



man class are elected to the board, 
these men having the highest number 
of points in their respective classes. 

Two kinds of work are possible, 
either that of a business kind or that 
along literary lines. The contestant 
may hunt up ads for the paper or he 
may receive assignments to be re- 
ported upon. All papers received from 
competitors are referred to the English 
Department for grading. They are 
then returned to the editor-in-chief 
who awards the proper credit. This 
work is sometimes, if thought advisable, 
used in the columns of the Signal. All 
work is graded according to the follow- 
ing scale of points: One credit is 
given for: 

Each five hours' work is to be given 
at the direction of the editor-in-chief, 
or 

Each ten inches of original copy. 
This includes athletic games and col- 
lege notes. 

Each fifteen inches of reprint or 
other material such as speeches, de- 
partment notes, and alumni notes, or 
material gotten by interview 



For 1913, Griggs captain, Ryder 



in a Tie Score. The Line 
Weak. 

Our football season opened Saturday 
at Orono, Me., with a tie game with 
the University of Maine, neither side 
being able to score. Both sides suf- 
fered from the excessive heat, while 
our men had the additional disadvan 
tage of having made the long trip, and 
they plainly showed the effects of it. 
The backtleld lacked unity and were 




Brett, Pierpont Parker. Eisenhouse (Capt ), 

Tupper, Mgr. 
Sophomore Rope Pull Team 



Robinson, Sanctuary. 



ship to the Board. 

It should be the object of every man 



anchor, Clegg, Hatch, Ellis, and 
Huntington. Judge, Chapman 1907; 
timer, Crosby 1909. 

The campus was livened up in 
New advertisements to the value of ! earnest when the Juniors took a half- 
ten dollars ($10) at the regular rates, j holiday and proceeded to make every- 

Thus a man may show his business body happy, 
ability by getting out and hustling after j As is the custom here at such 
ads, or he may show his literary ability | times, the old dress suits, the ragged 
by writing up the happenings around uniforms, some old dress or other 
college, at the same time making his woman's apparel and any old pajamas, 
work count toward the future member- in fact, anything wearable was hauled 

out and made to serve some ridiculous 
purpose. It has been some years 
to enter into some phase of college since such a motley set of rags have 
life. If athletics are not in your line, been seen on the campus, 
college newspaper work offers you a The Juniors encouraged the Fresh- 
substitute. By this method of compe- ■ men in their hard fought contest, and 
tition, the best men make the board. ' then after the passing of the brittle 
Come out and show that you are the pipes they began that foolishness, char- 
best man. This applies to Junior, acteristic of the day. 
Sophomore and Freshman alike. Start ♦ 

at once and make up for lost time. j SATURDAY'S FOOTBALL 
The competition closes Mar. 1, 1910. SCORES 

For further directions examine the M. A. C. 0, University of Maine 0. 
Signal Bulletin in North College. j Pennsylvania 20, Gettysburg 0. 

m Carlisle 9, Villa Nova 0. 

Last Friday evening, President and Syracuse 20, Hamilton 0. 
Mrs. Butterfield tended a reception to; Holy Cross 18, Norwich 0. 
the members of the Faculty of the col- Bates 15, Hebron 0. 
lege and their wives at their home on \ Williams 18, Rensselaer 0. 
Sunset Avenue. , Bowdoin 18, Fort McKinley 0. 



A Good Showing Ex- 
pected. 

It is hard to predict how we will 
come out in the two games this week. 
Dartmouth will play her first game 
with us tomorrow afternoon so there is 
nothing by which her power can be 
judged. We can only hope to hold 
her down to a Uw score and may be 
to gether with luck and the teams 
fighting spirit we may be able to get a 
few scores on our side of the card. 
Last year Dartmouth won six games, 
lost one, and tied one. 

Dartmouth 1 1 , Vermont 0. 
Dartmouth 23. M. A. C. 0. 
Dartmouth 18, Tufts 0. 
Dartmouth 0, Williams 0. 
Dartmouth 18, Holy Cross 5. 
Dartmouth 17, Amherst 0. 
Dartmouth 10, Princeton 6. 
Dartmouth 0, Harvard 6. 
Of these teams, Vermont and Tufts 
held us to tie scores, and Williams 
easily defeated us. 

Dartmouth is captained by Tobli, 
a guard, and coached by Lillard. an 
old Dartmouth man. 

Among the coiieges on her schedule 
are: University of Vermont, Bowdoin, 
Williams, Amherst, Holy Cross 
Princeton and Harvard. 

On Saturday the team Is again to 

meet a brand new foe. It looks as if 

this team was distinctly In our class 

but still as we have said before, they 

This Is the first time 



slow in starting. The line was not in 

good form, and was easly pierced by 

the Maine backs. The game opened ' are new foes. 

with Maine kicking off, and Roberts j M. A. C. has ever gone out of New 

soon punted. From then to the end, England to meet another team in 

the play was confined to the middle of football 



the field. Maine advancing the ball for 
a distance by line plays, then losing it 
either on downs or by kicking out of 
bounds, after which Roberts would punt 
far down the field, and the same 
operation would be repeated. The 
game ended with the ball in our 
possession on Maine's 45-yard line. 

The one redeeming feature of our 
play was the excellent punting by both 
Roberts and Schemerhorn. Maine 
was very weak in this department. 
Our new men, Roberts, Lew and Pow- 



Union played eight games last year, 
winning two, losing two and tieing four. 
Following Is the record In detail : 

Union 0, Stevens Institute 0. 

Union 5, St. Lawrence 5. 

Union 0, Wesleyan 0. 

Union 18, Hamilton 6. 

Union 0, Rochester 17. 

Union 4, Colgate 24. 

Union 39, Hobart 5. 

Union 5, N. Y. University 5. 

This gives the followers of our team 
absolutely no criterion to estimate our 
chances of victory by, for we did net 



ers showed up well, and Parker played P^y any of the above colleges las fall 
fine ball for our opponents. All the more reason to hope for a 

victory. 

The Union team Is coached this 



M. A. C. 

Leonard, 1. e. 
Schemerhorn. r. t. 
Walker, l.g. 
Hayden c. 
Powers. I. g 
Crosby. 1. 1. 
Lew, 1. e. 
O'Brien. 1. e. 
Morse, q. b. 
Blaney. r, h. b. 
Hosmer. 1. h. b. 



MAINE. 

1. e. Cook 
1. 1. Ray year by a Williams college man, 

1 g. Hilton Murry. The captain is Hegnembang, 
1. g. Durant a ha |f back. 

c Derby 

c. Eales j 
r. g. Wright At a recent meeting of the Frater- 

r. t. Bearce nity Conference, R. H. Allen, K. S., 
r. e. King was elected president, and E. H. 
q. b. Cleaves 



q. b. Waite 



Turner, Q. T. V.. secretary and treas- 



urer. 



[Continued on pngt 8] 



I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 21, 1909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOASD OF EDITORS. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 21, 1909. 



WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. 
HENRY A. BROOKS 1910, 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOS1AH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 191 I 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Asst. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 191 1, Colleg. Notes 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager 
PARK W. ALLEN. 1911. Asst. Business Manager 
ALDENC. BRETT. 1912. Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulate 



Who takes their place? Why you 
men, who come out and show your 
worth, are going to do it. Right now 
is the time to come to the office and 
hand in your name and get your 
assignment. Watch the Bulletin 
board for the topics of the week and 
then get busy. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 

PoS.^it M A^^ont.n d rg er * ,He Amh - 
Vol. XX. TUESDAY, SEPT. 28. No. 2 



A good chance to represent the col- 
lege, would be for some member of 
the student body to write the college 
news for the Boston papers. Even the 
Springfield Republican has had no word 
of college news for a week. This col- 
lege is alive. Don't let the public 
think we are dead ones. Besides 
helping the college the remunerative 
part of the proposition should also have 
its attractions. Perhaps the day will 
come when a press club will control 
our news items. 



The Maine game, while from the 
student's standpoint is unsatisfactory, 
was probably one of the best things that 
could have happened. It will give a 
chance to brace up some of those weak 
points. We must remember that the 
team took a long trip and besides had 
had very little time to get in condition. 
In fact we have nothing but praise for 
our team in its contest with Maine. 



RELIABLE FOOTWEAR 

In deciding where to buy your footwear while in town 
choose 

THE SHOE STORE THAT ALWAYS MAKES GOOD 

This Store was established in 1854 and has been under the present manager 
ment nearly i 9 years. It has always been a favorite place for M. A. C. Men 
to trade. We carry in stock the ELITE SHOE, $3.50 to $5.00 WHIT- 
MAN & KEITH SHOES f 4 .oo to $5.00, UI'HAM BROS SHOES 
15.00 t $6.oo, W. L. DOUGLAS SHOE $2.50 to $.400. 
TASCO the best $3.00 Shoe made. RUBBERS, TENNIS and 

SPORTING SHOES. REPAIRING. Very best workmaanship and ma- 
terials. 



JAMES F. PAGE 



The fact that, on Saturday, the 
team goes into territory, that it never 
before has played in, makes the game 
very interesting. We are looking and 
hoping for victorious results, regardless 
of the fact that this is a hard week for 
the team. Although we have plenty 
of rivals nearer home, it's a good 
thing to spread our relations as far as 
we may and the Union game will 
surely help along that line. 



Two weeks of college have passed 
and if that is any omen, there is a 
bright year before us. Fellows, the 
spirit has started right. Class and 
fraternity spirit is in the background 
and our college is everything to us. 
Let's keep that sort of atmosphere 
here. Sometimes it will be hard but 
remember life "doesn't always go along 
with a song." We can cheer a 
defeated team as well as a victorious 
one. The only thing it must be is a 
Massachusetts team and we stand 
united behind it. Not the spirit of 
criticism but the spirit of unity is what 
we have and what we must keep. 



In the last issue of the Signal our 
policy read "to work for the best inter- 
ests of the students and alumni of M. 
A. C." Now to follow this policy, we 
want to be of use to the college. We 
especially urge the different college 
organizations to use the Signal as a 
medium to put before the students or 
alumni the different phases of their 
work. The idea may be well illus- 
trated, by the Track article in this 
issue. If any organization wishes to 
get the student or alumni public inter- 
ested, try it through our columns. 
The Signal is not an organization by 
itself. It's a part of them all. We 
are in sympathy with every movement 
that amounts to anything and that has 
a real purpose in this college. Also a 
word to the alumni, let us be of ser- 
vice, that's our purpose. To the fac- 
ulty, we are open to you. If anything 
is to be announced or if any depart- 
ment or division is doing anything, 
that would interest the students or 
alumni, let our nine hundred papers a 
week, tell about it. 



Next to Post Office 



E. E MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 



30- 



The Sicnal is making a special 
announcement on the preceding page 
concerning competition and competion 
rules. Read them! For the Fresh- 
man class, we are trying to explain the 
method. The article itself is some- 
what editorial in nature but we want 
to urge all men from every class to 
make a try. This is the time of the 
year when our ideals are being estab- 
lished. We want men of ability to 
make the Signal their ambition and 
make it a high ambition. With each 
class go five men from the Board. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Sept. 29 — Student Mass Meeting. 

•Y. M. C. A. at 6.45 P. M. 

in Chapel. Dean George 

F. Mills, Leader. 
Debating Club at 7.45 P. M. 

in Chapel. 
9.15 A. M. in Chapel. Ex- 

Gov. George H. Utter, 

Westerly, R. I. 
12.45 M. Bible Study. 



Oct. 3 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Regular office hours for the Signal 
will be posted in a few days. 

At the mass meeting, last Wednes- 
day, W. J. Birdsall, '12, was elected 
assistant manager of baseball. 

A special course in Descriptive Ge- 
ometry has been granted to members 
of the Senior and Junior classes. 

The Sunday morning service was 
conducted by George E. Burgess, gen- 
eral secretary of Y. M. C. A. at 
Holyoke. He gave a very interesting 




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talk on "The parable of the Prodigal 
Son." 

President and Mrs. Butterfield gave 
an Informal Reception to the freshmen 
class at their home on Saturday even- 
ing. Representatives from the upper 
classes and faculty were present. 

The officers of the Junior class have 
been elected and are as follows : Pres- 
ident, H. W. Blaney; vice-president, 
P. W. Pickard ; secretary and treas- 
urer, C. A. Smiih; sergeant-at-arms, 
R. G. Smith, Class Captain, H. A. 
Pauley ; historian, A. P. Bursley. 

It is certain from the amount of 
water in the pond this morning that the 
annual tug-of-War between the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore class will take 
place on Thursday afternoon at four 
o'clock. The Senate held a meeting 
this morning and decided the matter. 

At the meeting of the Athletic Board 
last week, the following officers were 
elected : President, Dr. J. B. Paige ; 
vice-president, Prof. C. E. Gordon; 
secretary-treasurer, Prof. S. B. How- 
ard; Auditor, J. N. Summers. Dr. 
P. L. Reynolds was elected to the ex- 
ecutive committee. The Board ap- 
proved the football schedule. 

A meeting of the Debating Club was 
held on Thursday evening and the fol- 
lowing officers were elected : Presi- 
dent, H. J. Baker, '11; vice-presi- 
dent, B. Osterlenk, '11; secretary, 
A. C. Brett, '12; treasurer, J. C. 
Folsom, '10. Program Committee, 
Haynes, '10; McLaine, '10; and 
Osterlenk, '11. Plans for the year 
will appear in an early issue of the 
Sicnal. 



Store 



Basement of North College 



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NITRATE OF SODA, 95? Pure 

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Fertilizer Literature la sent Free of Charge If 
you mention the College Signal. 



THE COE -PlTim 60. 

24 26 Stone Street, NEW YORK. 



TENNIS. 

Last spring a tennis team represent- 
ing M. A. C. was organized for the 
first time, and five tournaments were 
played. The interest in tennis was 
confided to this team, no college or 
interf raternlty tournaments being played. 

This year the Association will proba- 
bly be handicapped as before, by hav- 
ing no appropriation, but we are not go- 
ing to be discouraged by that. 

The management has three plans in 
mind, which, it is hoped, can be suc- 
cessfully worked out. The first is a 
freshman fall tournament, so that an 
idea can be obtained of the new ma- 
terial in college. Eighteen names 
were entered in this tournament, wMch 
is now being played off as fast as possi- 
ble. The second plan, is a set of rules, 
which decides how the team shall be 
chosen, and will be printed in due time. 
The third, is a spring college tourna- 
ment. Suitable prizes will be offered 
and an entranced fee charged. 

Tennis Courts are as numerous as 
baseball diamonds and tennis is a game 
that can be played in all walks of life 
and during any spare hour. It is a 
sport that can be taken with you, when 
you leave college, so, faculty and 
students, let's get together, and push it. 
F. L. Thomas, Mgr. 




Sanderson 
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The store for 

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We announce our readiness 
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"For the Land's Sake." 



An acre of tillage land 8 inches deep, weighs 
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izer when no manure or green crop is plowed in, is 
1000 lbs., or one pound of fertilizer to a ton of soil — 
giving less than half a grain of actual plant food to 
each pound of soil. You have seen the wonderful 
results yielded by this infinitesimal application. 
What is the reason? 

Study the plant food problem. 



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Banquets a specialty. WALTER S. Oakhk. 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, September ai, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tnesday, September, 21, 1909. 









WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - 512.50 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - • - $1 1.50 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - #10.00 

Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Rain Cloth, - $3-5° l* 1- )'d. Trouserings, - $3-S° P er yard. 
I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A. P. SIM 

Worsted cV Woolens 



IN 



Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

(L^* Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



witb a full line of College Supplies 



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We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
®f Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
*S * dates large U. S. Copper cents 
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6 " dates icts. pieces 5octs. 

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25 " Broken Hank and Confederate 
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Scn.l for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars ami 
Selling price Mat. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST.. Boston. 



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LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
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BEST MATERIALS and 
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TRACK ATHLETICS. 

Track Athletics have been reestab- 
lished after a lapse of nine years. In 
its organization last year it was recog- 
nized as a major sport together with 
football and baseball, a plain four inch 
M being awarded to men by the Asso- 
ciation. This sport Is bound to com- 
mand an Increasing interest of the 
students and to develop so as to become 
much more extended in its scope. It 
constitutes a clean, manly sport, is re- 
cognized by the best colleges as such 
and in this capacity Is well worthy the 
support and parcipitation of our stu- 
dents. 

Interclass track athletics is carried 
on to the extent of across-county run in 
the fall, a winter indoor meet and a 
spring and out-door meet. The first 
of these is carried on under the aus- 
pices of tha Track Association and 
prizes are offered to the first five place 
men. The first three place men are 
credited; twelve, seven and three 
points respectively. These points 
count for their classes and aggregate 
together with points won in the winter 
and spring meets to determine the vic- 
torious class, which class thus se- 
cures a leg on a permanent cup. 

Due to the present incompleteness of 
our track equipment we are of necessity 
restricted to work on a wooden track 
and the relay team will this season, as 
last, be our strong feature. This track, 
new last year, is in design and size 
the counterpart of that used by the 
B. A. A. Our last year's relay team 
beat Worcester Poly Tech in the B. A. 
A. meet of last winter in the fast time 
of 3 min. 16 sec. This time beat 
that made by colleges larger and much 
better equiped than ourselves. There 
are this year two members, Captain 
Dickinson and Dudley, of last year's 
team with us, the freshman class 
offers some promising material from 
which to draw and material previously 
unnoticed has cropped out of the other 
classes. These things together with 
the fact, that an increased apportion- 
ment from the Athletic Board allows 
the arranging for entrance into four big 
winter meets in different cities, casts a 
bright light upon our prospective season. 
The track will be set up during the 
Thanksgiving recess and immediately 
with the opening of college training 
and trying out for the relay team will 
start. Come out men, try for the team 
or for different lengths on the track as; 
40, 390 or 1000 yards. A good 
chance to get your legs hardened and 
your wind good is out on the road, now, 
for your class, training for the cross 
county run. Get busy fellows, the op- 
portunity is yours. 

R. S. Eddy, Mg'r. 

The following officers of the Senior 
Class have been elected : President, 
W. R. Clarke; vice-president, R. A. 
Waldron; secretary and treasurer, H. 
T. Cowles ; historian, W. E. Leonard ; 
sergeant-at-arms, G. N. Vinton; class 
captain, C. A. Oertel. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
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Walk-Over Shoe 

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Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



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Before ordering your horses for 
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TENNIS GOODS 



FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 



GUNS and AMMUNITION 



HOCKEY SKATES and 



STICKS 



SNOW SHOES and 



SKIS. 



miAKt c 

E. A. Thompson 



MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 

The outlook for the musical associa- 
tion ih college is exceptionally bright. 
During the past week the glee club 
and orchestra met and tried out a 
goodly number of Freshmen. Mana- 
ger Dickinson reports equally good 
prospects for the mandolin dub, 
although a meeting has not as yet been 
held. In the orchestra there are 
nearly twenty men trying out ; four 
first violins, four second violins, two 
flutes, two cornets, one clarinet and 
two trombones, besides others, who 
have not as yet been decided upon. 
This out look promises the largest and 
best orchestra the college has ever 
had, especially if more of the men with 
ability will come out. A good 
orchestra hrlps the college In many 
ways, for social gatherings and singing 
and with an occasional musicale. 

P. W. Allen, the leader of the glee 
club is very enthusiastic over the out- 
look in his line. There were some 
twenty-five men out, two-thirds of 
which were freshmen. All the parts 
have not as yet been decided upon, 
but it looks as though a glee club of 
sixteen singers would tune up in fine 
shape. 

The college needs good musical 
clubs to keep pace with its neighbors, 
and so the leaders wish that every 
man who has ability in any of these 
lines would not be slow in showing 
himself. 

Orchestra : — The men who have 
tried out are Racicot, 1st violin leader ; 
Hyland '13, piano ; Wales ' 12, Tur- 
ner '13. French '13, 1st violins; 
Staab '13. Pillsbury "13. Fowler '12, 
Baird '13, 2nd violins ; Wheeler ' 13, 
flute de piccolo; Jenney '13 clarinet; 
Whitney 'II, Winn Ml, cornets, 
Allen Ml, Drury 13, trombones and 
Prou'y Ml, traps and drums. 

Glee Club:— P. W. Allen, leader ; 
Winn Ml, Racicot Ml, Ellis, Brett, 
and Walker '12, Barstow, Cobb, 
Briggs, Quinn, Patch, French, Zabris- 
kie, Prouty, Barber and Pease '13. 

BIBLE STUDY COURSES 

Freshmen — Studies in the Life of 
Christ, by E. I. Bosworth. 

Sophomores — Life of St. Paul, by 
W. H. Salimon. 

Juniors and Seniors — Life of St. 
Paul, by A. G. Leacock ; Social Sig- 
nificance of the Teachings of Jesus, 
by J. W. Jenks. ; Old Testament 
Heroes by . 

Groups will start Sunday, Oct. 3, 
and will run through fifteen weeks, 
ending Jan. 31, 1910. Leaders will 
be both Faculty and students, and will 
be announced when the groups are 
made up. Probably most of the 
classes will meet in the Chapel Sun- 
days at 12-45, but each group can 
change the time and place if it wishes. 

We hope everyone will enroll, j 
whether Association men or not. 
Kindly hand names to the following 
committee: Arthur W. Holland MO, 
Walter R. Clarke MO, Herbert W. 
Blaney Ml, Alden C. Brett ' 12, Frank 
B. Hills M2. 



1\ 1^. PAIOR 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Repair Work. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

1. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Presser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Kent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come E&rly and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4- 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 




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Fraternity 


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and 


Invitations 




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Class Inserts 


Menus 




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for Annuals 


Leather Dance 
Cases and 




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Fraternity 
and Class 


Covers 






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Calling Cards 


Stationery 


Wedding 


Invitations and 





WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, September it, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 21, 11909. 










GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

\£\ English and Scotch Woolens. 
& 



THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 



AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 



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HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59-4. 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 



A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



Insurance on Students' 
Furniture, Etc, $1.00 per 
$100. for 3 years while in any 
College or private building. 



W. R. BROWN 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Cut flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DUXTAL, ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
OtolSA.M. l.SK)to«l*.M. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



FIRST Y. M. C. A. MEETING 

On Thursday evening, Sept. 23d, 
the first association meeting was held. 
■ The student body turned out in good 
numbers and listened to an interesting 
talk by Secretary White, who said in 
parf 

Men, in many respects I consider 
this first association meeting the most 
important one of the year. We are 
just starting a new college year, and so 
much depends upon a good start. As 
we meet here tonight, to consider the 
higher interests in life, let's see to it 
that we get a good start. 

If I were to choose a text upon 
which to base my remarks, it would be 
those found in a portion of the 15th 
verse of the 24th chapter of Joshua : 
"Choose you this day whom ye will 
serve.' There is a great deal of 
meaning bound up in those words. 
First, there's the choice — choose you 
— you are to do the choosing. When? 
This day, not tomorrow or day after 
tomorrow, but tonight. Now what 
are we going to choose? Choose 
whom ye will serve. We may substi- 
tute, for whom, our ideal ; then having 
made the choice comes the service. 
Not always easy, upon flowery beds of 
ease. No, a service full of joy and 
sorrow but a service that is really 
worth while. 

To you new men who enter college 
for the first time, is coming this ques- 
tion of a choice. You cannot avoid it, 
therefore you must face it like men. 
Many of you have been guided in your 
choices by parents and friends. The 
restraint of home and friends have 
largely been left behind. You must 
now make your own choice and set up 
your own standard. Men, I wish 1 
could emphasize the importance of a 
right choice and a right standard. 
Similar to your standard at home, the 
standard you set up here will deter- 
mine the respect, faculty and students 
have for you and you will ever be 
judged according to that standard. 
The man who can help in your choice 
is Jesus Christ. 

Though we know but little of his 
earthly life, yet that little we do kn:>w 
has been sufficient to cause him to 
stand throughout the centuries and he 
stands today, yes, men, tonight, as an 
example never surpassed and the love 
and admiration of mankind is ever 
growing in his favor. Now men, after 
you have made your choice, there 
must be the support on your part, for 
not the man who says "Lord, Lord, 
shall enter into my house, but he that 
j doeth the will." Men, having made 
I the choice we must do our best in 
i every act of our life, we must live at 
our best and while doing that, worship 
, God through prayer and letting him 
speak to us through the Bible. I am 
not ashamed to point to this man 
Jesus Christ. How could I be when 
I think of what he has meant to me 
personally and to the world. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

HORTICULTURE. 

Professor Sears judged the fruit and 
Professor White judged the flowers at 
the recent fair in Greenfield. 

The big fruit crop of the Depart- 
ment of Pomology is now nearly all 
harvested. Grapes have been abund- 
ant, but the peach crop was consid- 
ered especially good. 

Professor Waugh goes this week to 
Raleigh, N. C, where he has been 
asked to give advice with regard to 
the development of the grounds of the 
State Agricultural and Mechanical 
College. 

Mr. J. K. Shav, experimentalist, 
has been collecting a big crop of plant 
breeding notes from his plots of peas, 
beans and pansies. 

The grounds about French hall have 
been graded and sowed to grass. 

ENGLISH. 

In Freshman English, the time for 
public speaking has been changed so 
that this subject will come entirely in 
th second half of the second semester 
instead of being distributed through 
the year. By this arrangement, his- 
tory of English literature occupies two 
hours a week up to the middle of the 
spring semester. At that time, the 
history is dropped, the public speaking 
taking its place for two hours until the 
end of the year. The number of 
Freshman credits and of hours in 
Freshman English remain the same; 
the difference lying in the redistribu- 
tion of the work. 

FLORICULTURE. 

During the time between the close 
of the Summer School and the open- 
ing of the fall term Professor White 
was engaged in making a survey of 
the floricultureal industry in the town 
of Natick, Mass. This survey is to 
form the. basis for a more extended 
survey of the industry throughout the 
state. 

James Whiting was recently ap- 
pointed foreman of the floricultural 
department. Mr. Whiting has been 
engaged in practical greenhouse work 
for twelve years, and for the last four 
years has been at the Waban Rose 
Conservatories in Natick. Mr. Whit- 
ing will have charge of the rose and 
carnation houses, and will assist in 
laboratory work. Mr. Connor will 
have general charge of the student 
labor, the growing of bedding plants, 
the sale of flowers, and will be over- 
seer of campus work. 

There will be a meeting of the Hor- 
ticultural Committee of the Board of 
Trustees in Boston, Monday Sept. 27, 
to decide in regard to the disposal of 
the old Durfee Range of Greenhouses. 



The following men have been ap- 
pointed theme readers in the English 
Department: H. A. Brooks, J. C. 
Folsom, W. C. Johnson, S. W. Men- 
dum, and E. H. Turner of 1910; and 
H.J. Baker, E. M. Brown and L. M. 
Johnson of 1911. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from I A. M. to 4 A.M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'83.— S. M. Holman of Attleboro 
was elected treasurer of the New Eng- 
land photographer's association for the 
tenth consecutive term at the last con- 
vention of that body. Mr. Holman 
has been nominated for another term 
in the Massaceusetts house of repre- 
sentatives and his election is regarded 
as quite certain. 

'02.— T. M. Carpenter is assistant 
with Dr. Benedict, for a number of 
years in charge of the Carnegie Lab- 
oratory of Nutrition at Brookline. Mr. 
Carpenter has planned and largely su- 
perintended the erection of the n3W lab- 
oratory building. He is doing most ex- 
cellent work as investigator of the nu- 
trition of man. He has recently pub- 
lished in connection with Dr. Benedict 
a number of articles in the "American 
Journal of Pnysiology. Mr. Carpen- 
ter's work Is spoken of in the highest 
terms by his superior. 

,03. — W. E. Tottingham was junior 
author of "The Nature of the Acid 
Soluble Compounds of Some Important 
Feeding Materials, " which appeared in 
the September "Journal of Biological 
Chemistry." 

'04.— E. A. Bachsuccetded Dr. A. 
W. Morrill, '02, in charge of the in- 
vestigations of the White Fly under 
the Bureau of Entomology. His head- 
quarters are at Orlando, Fla. 

•05.— W. M. Sears. Poultry and 
Fruit, Franklin, Mass. 

'05.— Married, Sept. 22, E. T. 
Ladd to Miss Rachel Bessom at the 
home of her parents, 75 Superior 
Street, Lynn, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ladd will resfcie at Roland Park, Md. 

'09.— Corbett, L. S., Instructor in 
Horticulture at the Rhode Island Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 
Kingston, R. I. 

'09.— Cutler, H., Claflln University, 
Orangeburg, S. C, teacher of Science 
and Agriculture. 

'09.— Noble, H.G., with Myron H. 
West, Superintendent of Lincoln Park 

System, Chicago. 

'09.— Monahan, J. V. andO'Grady, 
J. R., 23 Mrytle Street, Springfield, 
Tree Doctors. 

'07.— J, F. Eastman resigned his 
position at the New Hampshire experi- 
ment station in August. He is now 
studying for a master's degree at the 
University of Illinois. 

'07.— Clinton King is the holder 
this year, as last, of a scholarship at 
the Law School of Boston University. 
He is also taking a course in econom- 
ics at Harvard. 

'08. — W. F. Sawyer is employed 
in the offiece of a landscape gardener 
and architect at Leominster. Resi- 
dence, Sterling. 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



The first edition of the Amherst 
Student appeared last night, W. E. 
Clark 1910 is the editor for the com- 
ing year. 



ATTENTION! 



There area few Copies of the "1910 Index" 
still on hand. We are anxious to close them out at 



the earliest possible date. 



1913 



This is your chance to start your set of "Indexes" 
published by the classes that are in college with you. 
It will be impossible to secure a copy of the book by 
December 1st, if the sales continue as they have been 
going. If books 



ARE WANTED 



Place an early order with 



FRANK T. HAYNES 



8 South College 



OR THE 



AGGIE STORE 



See Sample at the "Aggie Store." 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 21, 



i 9 oy. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 
Money to continue your College 
Course? 

life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form oj Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving (!. Ihiris, ./oe„t I J Mirth 



M. A. C. o. UNIV. OF MAINE o 

[Continued from first page.] 



Roberts, f. b 
Moreau. f. b 



q. b. Carleton 

1. h. b Smiley 

1. h. b. Pond 

r. h. b. Parker 

f. b Hammond 

f. b. Battery 

Score. Maine 0. Massachusetts A C. 0, 

Umpire. Donnelly. Dartmouth. Referee. 

McCreadie. Portland A. C. Linesman. 

Mayo. Maine. Time 20m and 15m periods. 



TEAM LEAVES FOR DART- 
MOUTH- 

This morning the team left on the 
eight o'clock car for Hanover. The 
following men were taken : Blaney, 
Leonard, Schermerhorn, Hosmer. 
Hazen, Morse, Walker, Roberts, 
Morean, Lew, Hyden, Putman, Pow- 
ers, O'Brein, Hubbard and Gore. 
The probable line-up to start the game 
will be Hayden, c, Walker, 1. g. 
Hazen, i. g., Schermerhorn, r. t., 
Powers, I. t., Leonard, I. e., Lew, r. 
e. f Morse, q. b., Blaney, r. h. b., 
Hosmer, I. h. b., and Roberts, f. b. 

The men worked In the rain yester- 
day afternoon and while there was no 
scrimmage some sharp signal and 
tackling work was done. While the 
team may not have much hopes for 
victory, there is a mighty good chance 
that we will score. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE SATUR- 
DAY, OCT. 2, 1809 

Mass. Agri. College vs. Union at 
Schenectady. 

Yale vs. Syracuse at New Haven. 

Williams vs. Bates at Williamsburg. 

Wesleyan Univ. vs. Norwich at 
Middletown. 

Trinity vs. Worcester Tech. at Hart- 
ford. 

Princeton vs. Stevens. 

Holy Cross vs. New Hampshire State 
at Worcester. 

Dartmouth vs. Univ. of Vermont at 
Hanover. 

Bowdoin vs. Harvard at Cambridge. 

Amherst vs. Springfield T. S. at 
Amherst. 

Carlisle vs. Bucknell at Carlisle. 

Cornell vs. Rensselaer P. I. at Ithaca. 

The regular fall term at Brown Uni- 
versity opened last week, and the stu- 
dents were busy registering in thsir 
different classes. Immediately after 
chapel the Sophomores and Freshmen 
had their annual rush on the back 
campus, victory resting with the first- 
year men. The entering class num- 
bers about 200. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Statistics of its growth. 1898 to 1908 

1. Total Receipts: From 1898 to 1908 there was a steady increase in the total re- 
ceipts of the College. In the first five years of this period, they increased about 
35%, and in the latter five years, nearly 45% more, making a total of approximately 
80% in the ten years. 

2. Inventory of Buildings: From 1898 to 1903 the value of the College buildings 
increased about 30%; during the five years which followed, the increase was over 
60%. 

3. Total Inventory: The increase in total inventory, including land, buildings, and 
equipment, was not especially great, there being an increase of 42% from 1898 to 
1903, and an additional increase from 1903 to 1908, of 43%. 

4. Number of Instructors: The teaching force of the College increased 55% in this 
decade, the additions to the faculty coining gradually during the period. 

5. Number of Four-years' Students: The annual increase in number of regular 
students from 1898 to 1903 was slightly over 8%; the annual increase for the following 
five years was between 22% and 23%, the total increase being 158%. 

6. Total Enrolment: Under this head the most striking indication of the growth 
of the Institution is noted. In 1903 the total enrolment had increaesd 60% over 
that of five years previous. From 1903 to 190S there was an increased attendance 
Of 355%. toaldag a total increase In all departments of the College 415% for the 
ten year period. 

SUMMARY. 
Approximate Percent of Increase. 





1 


898 


•903 


11)03-1908 1898-1908 


Total Receipts 




35 




45 80 


Inventory of Buildings 




3° 




60 90 


Total Inventory 




42 




43 Bj 


Number of Instructors 




}o 




-5 55 


Number of Four-years' Stu 


lents 


43 




"5 158 


Total Enrolment 




60 




355 415 




SIGNAL DIRECTORY 


The College Senate, 








William E. Leonard, President 


Athletic Board, 








Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 


Football Association, 








R. H. Allen, Manager 


Baseball Association, 








G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 


Track Association, 








R. S. Eddy, Manager 


Hockey Association, 








L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 


Nineteen Hundred and E 


even Index, 




H. W. Blaney, Manager 


Y. M. C. A., 








F. T. Haynes, President 


Fraternity Conference, 








R. H. Allen, President 


Musical Association, 








L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 


Tennis Association, 








F. L. Thomas, Manager 


When Fitting 




Out 


Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St , Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



F. C. PLUBM 

Barber Shop 



All woik of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E, Roberts. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 5, 1909. 



No. 3 



SATURDAY, OCT. % KL A. C. vs. NORWICH ON CAMPUS 



ANOTHER TIE SCORE 


Union Score 6-6. Time Called 


With 


Our Ball on Six Inch 




Mark. 




First HALr. 




M. A. c. 
Rushes and return of punts 90 yds. 
Firsi downs made 1 
Average distances punted 45 yds. 
Penalties inflicted 5 ydt. 


UNION 

165 yds. 

5 
40 yds. 
20 yds. 


Second Half. 




Rushes and return of punts 1 20 yds. 
First downs made 6 
Average distances punted 50 yds. 
Penalties inflicted yds. 


1 35 yds. 
6 
30 yds. 
yds. 



FRESHMEN WIN 



Our third game ended in a tie score. 
The two teams were about equal in 
weight, but our men did not seem to 
be able to diagnose their opponents' 
play at first, and Union seemed to 
have the game cinched after their one 
touchdown. Then our team braced, 
and took full advantage of an opening 
offered by Blaney 's interception of a 
forward pass, and pushed the ball over 
for a tying score. 

Most of the gains on both sides were 
around tackle. Our punting excelled 
Union's, but they ran them back 
better. 

Union kicked off against the wind, 
and after a 10-yd. return, Roberts 
punted, Union returning it 10 yds. 
Massachusetts then held for downs, 
and punted to Union's 40-yard line. 
After a recovered fumble, Union made 
first down on a trick play. They then 
pushed the ball steadily down to our 
4-yd mark, only to lose it on a fumble. 
Roberts kicked to the 40-yd line. 
Union tried a drop kick, but it devel- 
oped into a short punt which Roberts 
carried back to the 30 mark. He 
soon punted 50. Union came back 
beyond the center, then was forced to 
kick. An exchange of punts, mingled 
with short gains, filled the rest of the 
half, which closed with a 9-yd gain on 
a trick play by Union in the middle of 
the field. 

Second Half : Putnam at left guard, 
Hubbard at right end. On Roberts 
kick off Union ran the ball back 46 
yds. and continued down the field to a 
touchdown by short gains. The goal 
was kicked. Score, 6-0 in favor of 
Union. 

Roberts kicked over the goalposts. 
Union put the ball in play on the 25-yd. 
line. After making 17 yds. and losing 
5, Union exchanged kicks, then on the 
third down well in their own territory, 
tried a forward pass, which Blaney 
captured. In five rushes the ball was 



Tug of War a Hard, Plucky Fight, Re- 
sults in Freshman Victory. Soph- 
omores Show Fine Spirit. 

The sophomore-freshman rope-pull, 
which was interrupted last Thursday 
by the breaking of the rope in the 
hands of the contestants, was decided 
on the following afternoon when sev- 
enty freshmen on the east bank finally 
suceeded in dragging an equal num- 
ber of their rivals through the pond 
after nineteen minutes of the most 
desperate pulling. At one time it 
seemed as though the sophomores 



DARTMOUTH GAME 



Dartmouth Defeats Us aa-o. 
All Done in First 
Half. 



Scoring 



Our game with Dartmouth in Han- 
over last Wednesday resulted in a vic- 
tory for the home team, 22-0. All the 
scoring was done in the first half, the 
first twelve points coming in about six 
minutes. Our team then braced, and 
Dartmouth had to work for the rest of 
her points. Most of her gains came 
on end runs, outside-tackle plays, and 
a few forward passes. The work of 
our team had improved considerably 




The Tug of War 



were to win, for, slowly and steadily, 
they gained ground until the foremost 
of the freshmen stood at the pond's 
very edge. At this point the new 
men displayed an unexpected reserve of 
strength, and, spurred to fresh endeav- 
ors by the throng of visitors which 
walled them in, they 'heaved" 
together until they had dragged the ex- 
hausted sophomores back over their 
tracks and through the pond. 

Long before four o'clock, the time 
set for the event, spectators began to 
arrive, some in motor cars and car- 
riages, some on foot. The cars from 
town came filled with Amherst college 
students, and when, at twenty minutes! Score, 6-0. 
past the hour, Professor Gordon, judge 
of the contest, fired the pistol the vis- 
itors, of whom the majority lined the 
east bank, numbered between six and 
seven hundred. 



over that of last week, but poor work 
was evident at times. Dartmouth's 
team is much better than it was last 
year at this time. 

The game started with Dartmouth 
kicking off. Tobin booted the ball 
over the goal posts. Roberts punted 
45 yards from the 25 yard line, and 
Dartmouth returned the ball to the 
center of the field. An onside kick 
went out of bounds on our 5-yd line. 
Roberts punted from behind the goal 
line. By means of a short run-back, 
two short gains through the line, and 
two long end runs, Dartmouth scored 
its first touchdown. Tobin kicked goal. 



[Continued on page 6.] 



[Continued oa page 61 



EX-GOV. UTTER SPEAKS 

Ex-Governor of Rhode Island Talks 

at the Sunday Morning 

Service. 

Ex-Gov. Utter of Rhode Island 
spoke before an unusually large gath 
ering of students at the Sunday morn- 
ing chapel service, his pointed and 
heart to heart talk taking the form of 
an appeal to the average man. "God. 
said he, "must love average men 
because he makes so many of them. 
It Is the average men of average 
accomplishments, who form the back- 
bone of society. General Grant 
replied when complimented on the 
success of the last campaign of the 
North, that it was not he who deserved 
the final credit of victory, but the 
thousands in the ranks -the average 
men. It is not to the president of a 
railroad or the officials in high author- 
ity that final credit is due for the safe- 
guarding of the lives intrusted to them 
but to the engineers and switchmen — 
the average men." 

The speaker went on to say that the 
thing most to be desired In an average 
man is faithfulness to duty, to truth 
and to lofty ideals and ambitions. The 
average man's ideal is, of course, 
Jesus, tne one man of spiritual and 
ohysicai perfection. This is the aver- 
age man's cry, nay, the cry of the 
whole world, "I would see Jesus." 
His study of science, of economics 
and of social problems voices the same 
phrase, "I would see Jesus." He 
yearns for Jesus because all the quali- 
ties which he admires in his fellow 
men are perfectly embodied in Jesus. 
Jesus was not effeminite ; he was 
virile and manly. He was a compan- 
ionable man and, above all, a 
"square" man; one who, were he 
here in college today, would be a fel- 
low among the fellows, a leader in 
athletics and the man most honored 
and beloved by all. He was a home 
man whose relations with his. family 
were of the tenderest and truest 
nature. He was loyal to his church 
and loyal to his government ; when 
cross questioned he replied, •■ Render 
unto Caesar that which is Caesar's 
and unto God that which is God's." 
He was chivalrous; the most wonder- 
ful tale of chivalry In all the world's 



Schermerhorn kicked off to Marks 

on the 5-yd. mark. A return of 15. 

... lU ■ lU , tt SJ history is told of him, how, sheltering 
yds, three plays through the left side l 'J t _ A ^ \ ^ '_ ____._,. _ 

of their line netting 35 yds, then a 



fumble recovered by Massachusetts. 

[Continued on page 7] 



with his broad shoulders a wretched 
woman about to be stoned to death 



[Continued on page 8.) 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 5, i 9 o 9 . 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 5, 1 



909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R.CLARKE, 1910, 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE, 191 1 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOS1AH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911, 
HERBERT W. BLANEY, 191 



Editor-in-Chief 
Asst. Editor- 
College Notes. 
Athletic Notes. 
Alumni Notes. 
Department Notes. 
1, Colleg* Notes. 



liant future for this student body. 
Now the contest is over, win or lose 
as the case may be, "still we are 
cheering for M. A. C 



» » 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 191 1, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE, 1912, Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



d E . nt A!£ d ** **&>"<*-&*** matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Application pending. 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, OCT. 5. 



No. 3 



Candidates for membership to the 
Signal Board are few and far between. 
There has been one man from each 
class ask for assignments. This week, 
now, is your time to get in the work. 



Out every night this week on the 
side lines, fellows. Get the cheers 
down cold. Sing with all the spirit 
that is in you. A game is coming 
Saturday. Get into it. Follow the 
cheer leaders. 



The Dartmouth game on Wednes- 
day certainly could not be called a 
failure from our standpoint. It showed 
that the team were fighters to the end 
and that as each day is passing, they 
are rounding up into fine shape. It was 
a hard week and they have done well, 
the polishing of a team, into something 
fine, is no short task and by the 
middle of the season we are expecting 
the best team on record. Don't for- 
get fellows that Dartmouth did not 
score in the last half. What's the 
matter with that for a goud omen. 



In an above editorial we have tried 
to give an appreciation of the pluck 
and spirit that was shown in the rope 
pull. Now we must make a criticism 
of the pull as a contest. Those of us 
who helped to care for the six or eight 
men who were taken to the rooms in 
an unconscious state cannot but feel 
that something is wrong. From the 
evidence of Friday there is certainly 
a possibility of a man injuring himself, 
so that he will carry the effects through 
life. Which is worse a broken arm 
for a month or a weak heart for the 
rest of one's life ? Certainly some 
revision should be made. Every man 
should be able to stand that strain, 
otherwise, he should not pull. Sup- 
pose only fifty should pull. That is 
number enough to make a few ripples 
in the water. We certainly ought to 
agree that there is some chance for 
reform along this line. 



RELIABLE FOOTWEAR 

In deciding where to buy your footwear while in town 
choose 

THE SHOE STORE THAT ALWAYS MAKES GOOD 

This Store was established in 1854 and has been under the present manager 
ment nearly 19 years. It has always been a favorite place for M. A. C. Men 

TAZ . WC ° arry in St ° ck the EUTE SHOK > *3-50 to $5.00, WHIT- 
MAN & KEITH SHOES $4.00 to $5.00, Ul'HAM BROS SHOES 
f5-oo to I6.00, W. L. DOUGLAS SHOE $2.50 to $.400. 

Jo^, the ^ ,3 '° Sh ° e made - RUBBERS, TENNIS and 

SPOR1ING SHOES. REPAIRING. Very best workmaanship and ma- 
tenals. 



JAMES F. PAGE 



Next to Post Office 



Well, the rope pull is over. From 
the spectators' standpoint it was the 
best contest since the last football 
game with Amherst. The snapping 
of the rope on the first day was truly 
disappointing, but we all can say that 
Friday's contest fully made up for it. 
It takes men to show the pluck that 
was evident in that puil. Nineteen 
minutes of such a terrible strain drains 
almost any man of his spirit and 
endurance. It also takes a promising 
class to stop at the water's edge and 
regain what they have lost and then 
win the day. For the sophomore 
class, you too showed of what you 
are made. Men do not drop 
their hold of the rope in an uncon- 
scious state of exhaustion without hav- 
ing done something. The victory or 
defeat, as the case may be surely 
means glory. It's not the losing or 
the winning it's "How did you fight." 
Our lower classes certainly have the 
qualities that go to make up "Massa- 
chusetts Men." We predict a bril 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

6— 1-1 5 p.m. Assembly. Talk 

by Dean Mills. 
7—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. in 
Chapel. Address by Pro- 
fessor Elihu Grant of 
Northampton. 
7—7-45 p. m. Debating Club 

in Chapel. 
8 — 6-00 p. m. Anniversary night 

at Draper Hall. 
9—3-00 p. m. Football game 
on campus. M. A. C. 
vs. Norwich University. 
10 — 9-15 a. m. Sunday morn- 
ing talk in Chapel by Owen 
R. Lovejoy of New York. 
10—12-45 p. m. Bible Study 
Classes in Chapel. 
Oct. 1 2—7-00 p. m. Stockbridge Club 
in Agricultural Room. 
President Geo. C. Creel- 
man of the Guelph Ontario 
Agricultural college. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <£ SHOE 
REPAIRING 

'at 

LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

R. LEVI N E 

11 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

President Butterfield attended today 
the inauguration of President Lowell 
of Harvard university at Cambridge. 
On the 14th of October he will be 
present at the inauguration of the new 
president of Dartmouth college. 

Charles H. White will speak this 
evening before the Jewish Federation 
J of Farmers of New York city upon the 
j work of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
; College. On Monday he spoke to the 
\ high school and grange of New Salem. 

The board of editors of the Tech, the 
undergraduate publication of the Mas- 
sachusetts institute of technology, 
have made arrangements to have the 
paper issued as a daily. Previously 
the Tech has been a tri-weekly. The 
i first issue of the daily will appear 
j Wednesday, when the institute opens. 




THURBER'S 

Nkxt-To-Pobt-officr 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



KODAKS 



AND 



BROWNIES 

PHOTO GRAPHIC SU PPLIES 

Be sure you get an 

EASTHAN FILH 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




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To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
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v 




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AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E.Y.Cosby Prop, 



There are seven good reasons 



why YOU should buy 



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C. R. ELDER 



FELLOWS! 

FOR YOUR 
SUPPLIES, CANDY, 
TONIC, etc. 

VISIT THE 

Aggie 
Store 

I'.asement of North College 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Ktfty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Pernvlan Uuano Base 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

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The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric 
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NITRATE OF SODA, 95 - Pure 

POTASH SALTS. 

Fertilizer Literature ia sent Free of Charge if 
you mention the College Signal. 



THE COE-PIORTIIHER CO. 

24 26 Stone Street, NEW YORK. 



ANNIVERSARY DAY 

On Friday, Oct. 8th, Anniversary 
day will be observed by the following 
program • 

2 p. m. — Meeting of Trustees Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds. 
5 p. m. — Reception by Trustees to the 
salaried employes of the college 
and station. Social Union 
Rooms, North College. 
6-30 p. m. — Supper at Draper Hall. 
Trustees, Officers of the Institu- 
tion, Local Alumni, Students. 
7-30 p. M. — Program : 

Music, College Glee Club, Orchestra, 

College Songs, etc. 
Ten minute addresses : 
Faculty — Professor Hurd. 
Trustees— C. E. Ward, 

M. F. Dickinson. 
Alumni— Charles H. White. '09. 
R.'D. Warden, '98. 
Dr. T. S. Bacon, '94. 
Saturday, 9-30 a.m. — Trustees' Meet- 
ing, President's Office, M.A.C. 

DEBATING 

Judging from the success of the 
College Debating club last year and 
from the way in which the old mem- 
bers are showing their loyalty, there 
is every reason to believe that this 
year the Debating club will be one of 
the most interesting and helpful organ- 
izations in college. For this reason, 
every man in college who is interested in 
debating, or who desires to get a train- 
ing which will be of prime importance 
to him — not only while in college but 
through life — should give to the 
Debating club his support. 

The club is young, having been 
organized for only one year ; but in 
spite of this fact, it is alive and is 
accomplishing good results. 

Every man in college taking the reg- 
ular four years course who desires to 
become a member, and who is willing 
to do his part when called upon, is 
eligible for membership. This, how- 
ever, is an active organization and its 
its members are expected to devote 
some time and effort to its interest. 
The club expects this time and effort 
because its object is to help its mem- 
bers, and to entertain both the mem- 
bers and friends of the club. And in 
order to secure these results, those 
who are on the program must, neces- 
sarily, prepare their part before the 
evening on which the program is to be 
rendered : for the one who spends no 
time in preparation receives no bene- 
fit, and his presentation surely is not 
interesting to the audience. Do not 
get the impression, however, that a 
great deal time is required and that 
you have no time to devote to the club. 
Practically every man in college can 
do what is required without any incon- 
venience to his regular work. 

Therefore as the object of the club 
is to help "you" and to entertain 
others, why not support it? It is a 
college organization. More members 
are needed. Here is an opportunity 
to show your college spirit, by "lend- 
ing a hand." 

H. J. Baker, President. 



Sanderson 
|;Co & Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 



with the 




BEST OUTFITTING 



the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
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Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



Successful crop growing rests, first, on a rich 
soil, available fertility. When the available plant 
food has been exhausted, what is the remedy? Will 
manure supply all that is needed? Will phosphate 
rocks or slags supply food available for plants? 
What treatment makes good plant food from inert 
sources, like raw bone, tankage, etc., and why? 

Study the plant food problem. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAHST., BOSTON 



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direct motor route from New York to Bolton. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Waltkr S. Gardk. 



C&rpfrvter & Morehous*, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 5, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tnesday, October, 5, 1909. 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $12.50 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $11.50 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $10.00 

Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Rain Cloth, - $350 per yd. Trouserings, - $350 per yard. 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & IVoolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

OT Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, 'io. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



witb a full line of College Supplies 



may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER KXBENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins 5octs. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

fi.oo 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3d. pieces 50cts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 " Broken Bank and Confederate 

Bills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mail Auction Circulars and 
.-tiling price list. 



M. I>. OILMAN. c. A. MOKKKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Stkeet. 

Worcester, Mass. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numi»mutint, 
19 WASHINGTON ST. Boston. 




GOX SONS 

AND 

VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



THE SANCTITY OF THE STUDY 
ROOM. 

I am Inclined to think that among 
some of our students there has grown 
up a degree of carelessness with re- 
spect to their own duty and the rights 
of other students, concerning the mat- 
ter of good conditions of study. I 
spent all of my undergraduate days in 
a college dormitory, and it was the un- 
written rule that everyone was supposed 
to knock at a student's door before 
entering, and that If the student in the 
room wanted to study, he had the priv- 
ilege and right to say so. It is very 
easy in domitory life for students to 
be dilatory about getting at their work 
in the evenings, to gather in certain 
rooms and discuss matters important 
and unimportant, and thus to create an 
atmosphere that is conducive to any- 
thing but real study.- 

The remedy for this difficulty lies in 
the development of a public student 
opinion, which holds that a student's 
study room, whether it be in a dormi- 
tory or in a private house, is absolutely 
his, and that other students are to be 
there only by invitation, or by hospitality ; 
that when any student visited by others 
shows a desire to study, that ought to 
be sufficient to give him the quiet room 
he needs. It would be particularly un- 
fair if a tradition should grow up that 
upper classmen may visit freshmen at 
will, stay as long as they want to, and 
let the freshmen have no right to pro- 
test. I certainly hope this spirit will 
never prevail here. 

I speak of this matter, because I am 
quite convinced that some of our men 
are thoughtless in regard to it. The 
student who would carry thoroughly well 
the average schedule here, simply must 
have two to three hours every school 
day evening for consecutive, uninter- 
rupted work on his studies. If he 
doesn't need this, he is either a man of 
remarkable capacity, or else his sched- 
ule does not give him the serious work 
that the college course ought to bring. 
This is not a matter of rule or regu- 
lation by the Faculty, but wholly a 
matter of the right sought of sentiment 
developed among the serious-minded 
students themselves. And so I should 
like to appeal for some consideration 
of the habits of study of our men by 
themselves, and th© development of a 
public opinion which accepts without 
question the idea of the sanctity of the 
study room from outside interruptions, I 
except at the free will of the occupant. 
Kenyon L. Butterfield. 

Editor's Note.— This is the first of a 
number of articles to be written by Presi- 
dent Butterfield. Also we are trying to get 
a few of our prominent alumni to write 
similar articles pertaining to college life. 





A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



*E. N. PAR1SEAU,j« 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



Columbia University opened for its 
150th academic year last week. Esti- 
mates place the total number of stu- 
dents registered at 4500, which will 
make the complete registration for the 
year, including the summer session, 
nearly 6500— the greatest number on 
record. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 

Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



H. WARREN 
<£ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 



THOJIIPSON 

SPORTING GOODS 

STORE 
and REPAIR SHOP. 

Rear First Nat. Hank. 



TYPEWRITERS 



For Sale or Rent. 



TENNIS GOODS 



FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 



GUNS and AMMUNITION 



HOCKEY SKATES and 



STICKS 



SNOW SHOES and 



SKIS. 



E. A. Thompson 



SOPHOMORES ABOLISH HAZ- 
ING. 

The present Sophomore Class In the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College has 
undertaken to throw its entire influence 
against the practice of hazing, which 
has prevailed more or less at the col- 
lege n days gone by. Certain exper- 
iences along this line last spring con- 
vinced the class that hazing was not 
only unfair, but that it was inimical 
to college welfare. 

The class, therefore, decided that 
when they became Sophomores, they 
would stand against all these practices 
that involve physical violence, or acts 
commonly known as hazing. Since 
the college reopened this autumn, the 
class has again asserted its purpose 
to use its influence against hazing this 
year, and in the future, and to endeavor 
to see that freshmen are treated in a 
gentlemanly manner. 

Although there is very little question 
that the majority of the upperclass- 
men of the college believe that the 
time has come for the abolition of 
hazing, it is greatly to the credit ot the 
Class of 1912 that they have taken this 
stand, and that they are so earnest 
in their desire to show their sincerity, 
and their loyalty to college interests. — 
Springfield Republican. 

THE WEEK'S FOOTBALL 
SCHEDULE. 

Wednesday October 6, 

Brown University vs. Bates at Provi- 
dence. 

Princeton vs. Villa Nova, at Prince- 
ton. 

St. John's College vs. Navy, at Anna- 
polis. 

Yale vs. Holy Cross, at New Haven. 
Saturday, October 9. 

M. A. C. vs. Norwich University, at 
Amherst. 

Amherst vs. Brown, at Providence. 

Army vs. Trinity, at West Point. 

Colby vs. Tufts, at Medford. 

Cornell vs. Oberlin, at Ithaca. 

Dartmouth vs. Bowdoin, at Hanover. 

New York University vs. R. I. State, 
at Kingston. 

Penn. State vs. Carlisle, at Wilkes- 
Barre. 

Princeton vs. Fordham, at Princeton. 

Union vs. Worcester Poly, at Schen'y. 

University of Maine vs. N. H. State, 
at Orono. 

University of Vermont vs. St. Law- 
rence, at Burlington. 

Williams vs. Harvard, at Cambridge. 

Yale vs. Springfield Training School, 
at New Haven. 



RIFLE CLUB MEETS 

The first meeting of the Rifle Club 
was held Friday night with forty pres- 
ent. The plans for the year were dis- 
cussed and a call was made for can- 
didates for the rifle team. It is the 
intention to have every man in college 
do some shooting this year. The fall 
work on the range will be devoted to 
trying out Freshmen and others wish- 



T. L,. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Repair Work. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Pressor, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Rent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishinirs, 

Come Karly and get Satisfaction. 
Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants #1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House it. the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

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Dance Programs 

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Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

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anil 

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for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Gut 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 5, 1909. 






■ •'.•.•••.*.•■•.•■.'•.•.•■.•.•■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•■.•.••.••-.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.. ....... .... .v-.wv .■•.•.•'..• .• 

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COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 



STKAM FITTING. Telephone 59-4. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

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A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 




Insurance on Students' 
Furniture, Etc, $1.00 per 
$ 1 00. for 3 years while in any 
College or private building. 



w. r. brown 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



ing to take up rifle shooting. A num- 
ber of local matches with neighboring 
militia companies and between the 
Faculty, graduates and the under- 
graduates are planned for the 
year. There will be talks by men 
prominent in state and national rifle 
shooting given during the winter. The 
Military Department is trying to secure 
a retired non-commissioned officer of 
the regular army to coach the team 
this year. With the interest shown 
now the outlook for the team is 
especially bright. Every man who 
shot on the out-door team last spring 
is back and getting into the game 
early. Mr. Sharpe,'l l.gave a talk at 
the last meeting on "Some of the 
factors influencing accurate shooting." 

DEPARTMENT NOTES 



FRESHMEN WIN 

[Continued from first page.] 



For fully a minute after the start 
neither side gained. Thereafter, for 
twelve minutes, the sophomores gained 
by inches, the freshmen battling gamely 
for all they were forced to yield. 
Exhausted by the tremendous strain 
one of the sophomores lurched from 
the rope and fell fainting on the grass. 
Three others followed in succession. 
The men at the rear of the sophomore 
line were now upon the graveled space 
beween North College and the chemi- 
cal laboratory where the hardness of 
the ground made it imposible to brace 
themselves. Moreover, the nature of 
the place rendered it impossible for 
them to move back along the line they 
had been following. So they were 
forced to deflect slightly, thus, impair- 
Prof. C. H. Fernald has recovered ' in g their effectiveness. Seeing that 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C *82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Block, Amherst, Mass. 
Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DBNTAt, ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
JM..Iii.V.M. l*0O*OfSE» 9 JM. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



from a recent illness so that last week 
he was able to visit the Insectary. 

horticulture. 
Mr. J. K. Shaw expects to leave on 
Monday for an extended trip through 
New England studying apple variation. 
A large number of apples from outside 
New England are being received for 
examination in connection with the 
work. 

market gardening. 

The Boston Market Gardeners' As- 
sociation visited the college on Sept. 
1 1th, coming from Boston in a special 
train. The party consisted of one 
hundred and nineteen and arrived at 
the college about eleven o'clock ; the 
time until 12-10 was spent visiting the 
buildings on the west side of the cam- 
pus. Special interest being shown in 
the visit to the new barns. At 12-30 
dinner was served in Draper Hall. 
President Butterfield and Professor 
Brooks and others of the college staff 
being present. At the close of the 
dinner President Butterfield welcomed 
the association and briefly outlined the 
work and the purposes of the college 
laying particular stress upon the possi- 
bilities of mutual benefit in the work- 
ing together of the practical man with 
the college and Experiment Station. 
Then Professor Brooks followed with a 
few remarks prefacing the inspection 
of the Experiment Station grounds 
which he conducted. The gardeners 
then visited the grounds of the Horti- 
cultural Division including orchards 
and vineyards. 

At four o'clock about 100 of the 
party took a special car going north. 
About forty got off at 



it was useless to continue pulling, a 
number of them rushed to the forward 
end of the rope only to find that it had 
been forced so close to the ground 
that they could be of but slight 
assistance. 

In the meantime, on the opposite 
bank, cheers broke forth from the spec- 
tators as the freshmen began to move 
back with the rope. A glance revealed 
that one of the freshman aides had 
secured a bucket and was drenching 
the men all along the line with water 
from the pond. Revived by the wet- 
ting the freshmen gained more rapidly 
every moment and, although the soph- 
omores kept shifting back along the 
rope as they reached the water, they 
could not stem the tide and were 
finally floated through dangling on the 
rope. The last of the sophomores to 
cross was the acting class captain, who, 
while he had not taken part because of 
an injured arm and was not required 
by the rules of the contest to cross, 
preferred, nevertheless, to share the 
fortunes of his classmates. 



ANOTHER TIE SCORE 

[Continued from first page.] 

pushed over, Roberts doing most of 
the carrying. Morse kicked goal. 
Score, 6-6. 

O'Brien put in at left end. 
Union's kickoff was short, and was 
carried back to the center. A kicking 
duel, Morse's 10-yd. run, a forward 
pass to O'Brien, and two line plunges 
advanced the ball beyond the goal line, 
Plumtr;eibut it was pushed back to the 6-inch 
Road, where they were met by Cyrus line, and the whistle blew, on our first 
M. Hubbard, '92, who had provided d own 
conveyances to take the people to his 
tobacco farm, where they greatly en- 
joyed the inspection of the tobacco in 



M. A. C. 

Lew. 1. e., 
■ O'Brien, 1. e., 
the field and in the barns. Mr. Hub- Powers. 1. t., 
bard thoroughly explained his methods l Hazen. 1. g., 
and then the 50 acre tobacco planta- P utnam ' •■ 
tion near by was visited. 

The rest of the party under the leader 
ship of Professor White went to Sun- Leonard, r. e 
derland walked over to the South Deer- I " ubbard - [• •*. 

/, ij ,, , . , Morse, a, b.. 

field side and were there met by a I Hosmer, I. h. b.. 

special car on which they made a j Blaney. r.h.'b.l 

special trip down the valley to North- Roberts, f. b., 

ampton and back to Amherst. 



Hayden, c, 
Walker, r. g.. 
Schermerhorn. r. t. 



r. h. 



UNION 

r. e., Irish 

r. t„ Sellnow 

r. g., O'Connell 

c. Vedder 

1. g., Micks 

I. t., Houck 

1. e.. Anderson 

q. b., Fairbairn 

q. b., Riley 

b., Hegnembang 

1. h. b., Shutler 

f. b., Stewart 

f. b.. Smith 



Supper was served at 5-30 the party '• )Y icks of Svracuse ; Field i ud e e . Cahill of 
■vinrr fnr R«c««« ~n *i,.u »^ In c in i Hol y Cross i Head linesman, Grout 



leaving for Boston on their train 6-30. 1 mfnutehaWcs 



Referee, Draper of Williams j Umpire, 

of 
20 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 5, 1909. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-oi' Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



DARTMOUTH GAME 

[Continued 'rom first page] 



A short gain, then Leonard failed to 
hold a forward pass, and the Green got 
the ball on their 50-yd. line. A line 
play advanced the ball ten yds. A 
forward pass made it necessary for 
Morse to make the tackle, on the 20 
mark. Four plunges scored the sec- 
ond touchdown, Tobin again kicking 
goal. Score, 12-0. 

Our next kick-off was short, and 
was returned to the 54-yd. line. After 
losing five on a fumble, Dartmouth 
made eight around left end, punted to 
our 10-yd. line, Morse bringing it back 
8 yds. An exchange of punts and a 
fumble gave us the ball. A quarter- 
back run lest 8 yds. Roberts punted 
to Dartmouth 40 line, Hazen tackling. 
A couple of gains put the ball in the 
exact center of the gridiron. Inger- 
soll*s punt was blocked by one of his 
own men, Blaney getting it. Roberts 
made 15 through left tackle, but was 
soon forced to punt. An exchange of 
kicks followed, then the Green backs 
in five plays put the ball over. No 
goal. Score 17-0. 

Massachusetts' kick-off was run 
back to the 40 line, then Dartmouth 
made 4 and 10, but was penalized 15 
for using hands. Morse let the punt 
get away from him, but he fell on it on 
his ten yard line. Roberts kicked out 
of bounds on the 30-yd. line, whence 
the fourth touchdown was scored on 
short hard smashes. No goal. 
Score, 22-0. 

The half ended with the ball in our 
possession near the middle. 

Second half : Putnam at left guard. 
Three other substitutes were put in be- 
fore the half closed. O'Brien and 
Hubbard at end, and Moreau at full. 
Penalties were frequent for offside and 
incomplete forward passes. Dartmoufh 
cdme down to our 25-yd. line once, 
but did not seriously threaten to score. 
They had the ball on their own 40- yd. 
line when the whistle blew. 

The line up: 



M. A. c. 

Leonard, r. e., 
Hubbard, r. e., 
Schermerhorn, r. t 
Walker, r. g., 
Hayden, c. 
Hazen, 1. g., 
Putnam, 1. g., 
Powers, 1. 1., 
Lew, 1. e., 
O'Brien. 1. e., 
Morse, q. b., 
Blaney, r. h. b. 
Hosmer, 1. h. b., 
Roberts, f. b., 
Moreau, f. b., 

Score — Dartmouth, 22 
Touchdowns — Marks (3), Ryan. Goals from 
touchdowns— Tobin (2). Referee— Murphy, 
Harvard. Linesman— Morrill. Time— 20 
and 10-minute halves. 



DARTMOUTH 

1. e., Daly. Palmer 

1. t., Sherwin 

1. g., Tobin 

c, Dingle, Thompson 

r. g., Farnum 

r. t., Lang, Needham 

r. e., Bakart, Johnson 

q. b.. Brady, Pishon 

1. h. b., Ingersoll, Hyde 

r. h. b., Ryan. Lovejoy 

Marks, Dudley 



f. b. 



M. A. C, 0. 



Yale captains whose elevens lose 
the Harvard game never come back to 
New Haven as field coaches. Burch 
is teaching the University of Cincinnati 
squad. 



ATTENTION! 



There area few Copies of the "1910 Index" 
still on hand. We are anxious to (lose them out at 
the earliest possible date. 



1913 



This is your chance to start your set of "Indexes' 1 
published by the classes that are in college with you. 
It will be impossible- to secure a copy of the book by 
December 1st, if the sales continue as they have been 
going. If books 



ARE WANTED 



Place an early order with 



FRANK T. HAYNES 



8 South College 



OR THE 



AGGIE STORE 



See Sample at the "Aggie Store." 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 5, 1909. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 
Money to continue your College 
Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to Vou a cheap 
and Legitimate firm oj Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Truing (1. Davit, . tgent I ..' North 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $ 1 . 



CARS 



x,k?y e AG(J, E COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOLh on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOXIIE COL- 

b«P.E* t7 and 37 m,m ' P«»t each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. IT. CO. 



EX-GOV. UTTER SPEAKS 

f Continued from first page.] 



for her sin, he cried in the face of the 
mob that assailed her, "Let him that 
is without offense cast the first stone. " 
Lastly, he possessed that quality of 
divine self-confidence which caused 
him, when he knew he could not be 
spared the suffering of the cross, to 
say, "Not my will but Thine be done." 
"Men," said Governor Utter, "grow 
in favor with God and I promise you 
that you'll grow in favor with men. 
Keep your bodies, these temples to his 
glory, undefiled and remember that 
you can't accomplish the work you 
were put into the world for unless you 
do this. Honor your homes, your 
fathers and your mothers just as Jesus 
did. Now that you are away from 
home let your record here at college 
go back clean. Be loyal both to God 
and to the government under which 
you live. Stand for what is best in 
lite and you will grow in character and 
intellect. Strive for the divine self- 
confidence of Jesus; and, like Jesus, 
follow the path of duty when the crisis 
comes. Rejoice that you are an 
average man and able to carry with 
you the God-sent message that is 
opening up a future to the world. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Statistics of its growth. 1898 to 1908 

1. Total Receipts: From 1898 to 1908 there was a steady increase in the total re- 
ceipts of the College. In the first five years of this period, they increased about 
35%, and in the latter five years, nearly 45% more, making a total of approximately 
80% in the ten years. 

2. Inventory of Buildings: From .898 to 1903 the value of the College buildings 

increased about 30%; during the five years which followed, the increase was over 
60%. 

3. Total Inventory: The increase in total inventory, including land, buildings, and 
equipment, was not especially great, there being an increase of 42% from 1898 to 
1903, and an additional increase from 1903 to 1908, of 43%. 

4. Number of Instructors. The teaching force of the College increased 55% in this 
decade, the additions to the faculty coming gradually during the period. 

5. N umber of Four-years' Students: The annual increase in number of regular 
students from 1898 to ,903 was slightly over 8%; the annual increase for the following 
five years was between 22% and 23%, the total increase being 158%. 

6. Total Enrolment: Under this head the most striking indication of the growth 
of toe Institution is noted. In 1903 the total enrolment had increaesd 60% over 
that of five years previous. From 1903 to 1908 there was an increased attendance 
°» 355%. making a total increase in all departments of the College 415% for the 
ten year period. 

SUMMARY. 

Approximate Percent of Increase. 
1898-1903 

35 
30 
42 
30 

43 
60 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Total Receipts 
Inventory of Buildings 
Total Inventory 
Number of Instructors 
Number of Four-years' Students 
Total Enrolment 



1903-1908 

45 
60 

43 

25 
"5 

355 



1898-1908 
80 
90 

85 

55 
'58 
4i5 



Amherst, Mass. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Tennis Association, 



William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

R. H. Allen, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

HEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 

G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



OCTOBER THEATRE BOOKINGS 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

Oct. 5 — Grace George in "A 
Woman's Way." 

Oct. 6— "A Girl of the Mountains." 

Oct. 7 — May Robson in "The Reju- 
venation of Aunt Mary." 

Oct. 9— "Human Hearts," with 
matinee. 

Oct. 12— George P. Huntley. 

Oct. 14— "A broken Idol." 

Oct. 15— Mrs. Fiske in "Salvation 
Neil." 

Oct. 18— "The Village Parson." 

Oct. 19— "The Yankee Doodle Detec- 
tive." 

Oct. 20— "The Thief." 

Oct. 23—' « Eight Bells, " with matinee. 

Oct. 25— "Paid in Full." 

Oct. 26— Hattie Williams in "Detec- 
tive Sparkes." 

Oct. 28 — The Traveling Salesman." 

Oct. 30— Nellie McHenry in "M'liss" 
with matinee. 



'90. — At the third annual meeting 
of the American Peat Society held at 
M. I. T., Boston, H. D. Haskins 
spoke on "Peat In Agriculture," 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 12, 1909. 



No. 4 



A BRILLIANT VICTORY ANNIVERSARY NIGHT 



Norwich Beaten 6-0. In Spite of Warm 

Weather the Team Shows Fine 

Form and Excellent Head Work. 

Our football stock rose several points 
Saturday when our team defeated Nor- 
wich, a team that has been upsetting 
the equilbrium of some of the classy 
colleges by its rapid and bewildering 
trick plays. But our boys refused to 
be fooled, and no trick would work a 
second time. Our tackles and ends 
broke through and smothered the plays 
before they started, as is shown by the 
fact that their opponents lost 45-yards 
In this way. Our defensive work was 
excellent, but Roberts and Morse 
were our only consistent ground gainers. 

The game opened with Roberts 
kicking off to Schakowski who ran the 
ball back to our 80-yard line. Then in 
nine rushes, mostly trick plays, Nor- 
wich landed the ball on our 30-yard 
line on a third down. A place kick 
was tried, but went into the line, and 
was recovered by Norwich In the cen- 
ter of the field, but It was our ball on 
downs. After two short gains, Rob- 
erts punted 40-yards, Norwich bring- 
ing it back to their 43 mark. A fumble 
was recovered on their 30-yard line. 
Their punt was returned to our 52- 
yard line. Two rushes gave us six 
yards, then Roberts punted 30-yards. 
At this point Walker was taken out 
with a twisted knee, Putnam replacing 
him. Reed realed off 35-yards around 
right end to our 45 line. Then 15 
more on a fake forward pass. Then 
4-0, and a drop kick was blocked, 
Hazen getting it to Hosmer bucked for 
6-yards, and Roberts made it first 
down. Three tries put the ball on 55 
mark, but a penalty lost 15 for us. 
Roberts punted 35. Norwich returned 
it to their 50 mark. A loss of five 
yards on two plays forced a punt, which 
Morse ran back 15 to our 45 line. A 
short gain, a penalty of 5 yards for 
tripping, put us In the center of the 
field. Roberts made 25-yards on a 
delayed pass through left tackle, then 
made a fine attempt for a drop kick, 
but failed by a yard. Time up. 

Second Half: Morse ran the kick- 
off from the 15 mark to the 38. A 
second later he ran 21 -yards around 
right end. After two short gains Rob- 
erts punted to Norwich 16-yard line, 
but Reed fumbled, and O'Brien se- 
cured the ball 



AGAINST HAZING 



Great Enthusiasm Shown at College 

Supper. The Spirit of Unity a 

Distinguisning Feature. 

The first of the series of college 
nights, celebrating in this instance the 
forty-second anniversary of the birth of 
M. A. C, was observed Friday even- 
ing at Drapj. hall. The guests of 
honor were the trustees and alumni, 
and from their number the speakers of 
the evening were chosen. After sup- 
per, which was served at half after six, 
chairs were drawn up to form congenial 
circles, and students, alumni, teachers 
and trustees prepared to listen to the 
introductory remarks of President But- 
terfield. The president's words voiced 
the spirit with which the meetii.g was 
rife — the spirit of M. A. C. Although 



Trustees Commend Class of 191a. Pass 
Resolutions of Hearty Co- 
operation. 

The Trustees, at their meeting 
on Saturday passed the following 
resolution : 

Resolved : That we commend the 
action of the Class of 1912 in discour- 
aging hazing at the Agricultural col- 
lege, and trust that this action will 
receive the hearty support of the entire 
student body. 

Further, that it is the sense of this 
Boatd that this policy shall be con- 
fined in the future, in the carrying out 
of which this Board will heartily 
co-perate. 

J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary. 
Oct. 9th, 1909 



RUSHING RULES 



Mass Meeting 

In Chapel, Wednesday, 6-30 P. M. 

Worcester Tech. 

On Campus, Saturday, 3 P. M. 

FirstInformal Dance 

In Drill Hall, Saturday, 4-30 P. M. 



but recently returned from the in- 
augural exercises at Harvard, and pro- 
foundly impressed by the wealth of 
learning and tradition to be found there, 
his tribute, nevertheless, was to 
M. A. C. Said he, "We are gathered 
beneath the banner of a college which 
has written some history but which has 
far more to write — a history which 
will prove just as noble and inspiring as 
that of Harvard. Moreover, we are 
gathered at an hour when the whole 
tide of affairs is bearing the college 
on." 



The president thereupon read a brief 
letter of greeting to the students from 
Dr. C. A. Goessmann, and the hearty 
No gain, then Rob- cheering that followed showed the 
erts 11-yards through tackle. Then universal love for Dr. Goessmann. 
Hosmer to the 6-inch line, then Rob- The speakers of the evening followed ; 
erts carried It over. Morse kicked for the trustees Mr. M. F. Dickinson 
goal. Score, 6-0. | and Mr. Charles E. Ward, who alluded 

Roberts kicked off, Reed bringing to himself as the "freshman" mem- 
ber of the board, since he is youngest 



SUNDAY MORNING ADDRESS 

An interesting talk was given at the 
Sunday morning service by Mr. Owen 
R. Lovejoy of New York City, secre- 
tary of the National Child Labor 
Committee. 

Mr. Lovejoy said in part, "It was 
formerly an idea in America that 
child labor was something foreign to 
this country. Ten years ago we awoke 
to the fact that a greater percentage 
of children under sixteen work in the 
factories of our country than in those 
of even England. Another mistaken 
idea is that child labor is in its worst 
form form in the South. In Pennsyl- 



Fraternity Conference Meets and Talks 
Over Rules. Some New 
Changes Made. 

At a recent meeting of the Frater- 
nity Conference, the following rules in 
regard to the rushing of new men for 
membership were adopted: 

No candidate for fraternity member- 
ship shall be spoken to about, nor 
shown literature pertaining to, nor 
approached in any manner whatsoever 
In regard to fraternities or fraternity 
membership until after the chapel 
exercises on the second Tuesday 
morning after the Thanksgiving recess. 
No candidate for fraternity member- 
ship shall be spoken to about, nor 
shown literature pertaining to, nor 
approached In any manner whatsoever 
in regard to fraternities or fraternity 
membership after six o'clock p. m. 
Thursday of the same week, and no 
fraternity man shall be with him from 
that time until after chapel of the fol- 
lowing morning. 

The wearing of a fraternity pin, or 
pledge emblem by a candidate shall 
signify that the bearer Is pledged to 
that fraternity, and that the pin. or 
pledge emblem shall be volunlaruy put 
on by the candidate himself during the 
chapel exercises of the following 
morning (Any verbal or written prom- 
ise shall not be valid). 

No candidate shall be taken out of 
town during the above mentioned 
;1 working" season, and no fraternity 
man shall associate with such candi 
date while out of town during the afore 
said season, 

No prepared spread, banquet, enter- 
tainment, etc., shall be gtven to a 
candidate by any fraternity or group of 
fraternity men during the "working" 
season, and no fraternity or group of 
fraternity men shall give a prepared 
entertainment, spread or banquet prior 
to the "working" season. 

If a candidate is not pledged at this 
time he is not eligible for membership 
to any frattrnity until May first of the 
same year, except by special arrange- 
ment of the Fraternity Conference. 

Special students shall not be con- 
sidered eligible candidates for frater- 
nity membership. 

It is strongly urged that these rules 
be strickly adhered to, as by that 



the ball back to the 23-yard line, Nor- 

[Co n tin u ed oa page 71 



[Continued oa page 5.] 



vania alone there are more children I means only can the fraternity spirit of 

employed in the coal-breakers than in j the college reman good. 

all the cotton mills of the South. ' "•" 

i The Stock Judging team composed 

of Haynes, Beeman and Titus of the 



to 



cotton 
Some people consider the cause 
child labor all foolishness. 'I went 
work when I was eight years old and senior class took part in the Intercolle- 
\~ , __ giate Stock Judging contest held last 

it never did me any harm. The man ^ hursday at tne Brockton Fair. 

who says that we usually find has Results of the scores will be an- 
[Coatiauad oa p*e« 3] nounced later. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 12, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 12, 1909. 



THE COL LEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor-in-Chief. 

Asst. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 



WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE, 1911, 
HENRY A. BROOKS 1910, 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 



JOSIAH C. FOLSOM, 1910, Alumni Notes. 

EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911, Department Notes. 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, College Notes. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1 . Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 



Subscription $150 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Application pending. 

Vol. XX TUESDAY, OCT. 12. No. 4 



At the recent Democratic conven- 
tion the following plank was inserted In 
their platform. "The establishment 
of agricultural schools throughout the 
commonwealth." This looks like a 
move in the right direction. Every 
party should have such a plank. It is 
of large importance. 



was played off their feet. The way in 
which our team went at their work 
diagnosing those tricks and then with 
brilliant skill shoving the ball down the 
field, was worth seeing. Coach Gage 
deserves the highest credit and the 
boys on the team have our praise too. 
It was only the result of good hard 
work and we appreciate it. 



The Signal believes that it is voic- 
ing the opinion of the greater part of 
the student body when It says 'that we 
need better physical supervision.' 
There was a noted absence of medical 
aid on the field on Saturday. Men 
were hurt and the coach was obliged 
to care for them himself. We hire a 
coach to train a team not to bind up 
bruises. Practically the same course 
of events happened at the Union game. 
It's not the right state of affairs and 
certainly an understanding should be 
brought about with the Physical De- 
partment. Our college demands that 
every man, whether member of the 
faculty, alumnus or student, should do 
his duty. 



RELIABLE FOOTWEAR 

In deciding where to buy your footwear while in town 
choose 

THE SHOE STORE THAT ALWAYS MAKES GOOD 

This Store was established in 1854 and has been under the present manager 
ment nearly 19 years. It has always been a favorite place for M. A. C. Men 
to trade. We carry in stock the ELITE SHOE, $3.50 to $5.00, WHIT- 
MAN & KEITH SHOES 14.00 to $5.00, UPHAM BROS SHOES 
$5-00 to $6.00, W. L. DOUGLAS SHOE I2.50 to $.400. 
TASCO the best $3.00 Shoe made. RUBBERS, TENNIS and 

SPORTING SHOES. REPAIRING. Very best workmaanship and ma- 
terials. 



JAMES F. PAGE 



Next to Post Office 



All those who heard Mr. Lovejoy's 
talk on Child Labor at the Sunday 
morning service could not help but feel 
that here was applied Christianity. 
This Is the talk and the sort of work 
that appeals to college men. All the 
preaching in the world does him but 
little good. He wants to know, why? 
How can he apply it? And as soon as 
you begin to show him you strike the 
right cord. 



College night was certainly a suc- 
cess. Unity in mind, body and spirit. 
One great inspiration, M. A. C. cap- 
turing them all, faculty, alumni, and 
students. Events like last Friday 
night are what keep students together. 
Let us keep this up and never cease 
until we have our ambition — Massa- 
chusetts, the finest college in the land 
and we, "Sons forever of the old Bay 
State, loyal sons, loyal sons, are we." 



The Signal has heard some 
criticisms concerning the spirit of a 
few freshmen. College customs are 
not being lived up to by every mem- 
ber of the freshman class. It probably 
is ignorance. 1913, it's not only the 
manly thing but it is your duty to obey 
these customs. When work has to be 
done on the field or you are asked to 
carry a suit case for a member of the 
team, don't have to be driven but 
volunteer. A man, to ever be a good 
master, must first know how to obey. 



The first informal dance comes on 
Saturday afternoon and evening. 
These informals to be a success, must 
be supported by the student body. 
We want more than twenty men to go. 
Fifty must be there. The informal 
dances don't need to be explained to 
the old men, for a good share of them 
know that the best times, they have 
had in college, were at the Informals. 
To the new men, we want you to try 
this one and you will find that the habit 
will be the pleasantest one you have 
ever formed. It Is a part of the round- 
ing out of every man to take in the 
social events while in college. Here 
is a chance to be in the best social 
atmosphere that one can find any 
where. Freshmen, upper class men 
take advantage of your opportunities. 
Go to the informal. If you can not 
get a girl ask an old man, they will be 
only too glad to lend a hand. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <£ SHOE 
REPAIRING 

.AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

a. m. to 



Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. 
All kinds 01 Shoe Shin 



m. 
ines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 



LEVIN E 

11 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 




THURBER'S 



Next To Post office 



Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



The team is justifying our expecta- 
tions. The Norwich game on Satur- 
day proclaimed that. It has been 
some time since we have seen better 
football on this campus. Norwich, 
who in the first part of the season 
seemed to worry all comers, certainly 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Oct. 12. — Stockbridge club In Agricul- 
tural Room. Pres. George 
C.Creelman of the Guelph , 
Ontario, Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

Oct. 13. — Assembly: Address by 
President Creelman. 

Oct. 14.— Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m. 
in the Chapel. Leader, 
Mr. Alfred H. Evans of 
Northampton. 
7-45 p. m. in Chapel Meet- 
ing of the Debating Club. 

Oct. 15. — Football game on Campus 
3-00 p. m. M. A. C. vs. 
W. P. 1., 4-30 p. m. In- 
formal dance in Drill Hall. 

Oct. 17. — Sunday service 9-15 a. m. 
in Chapel. Hon. A. T. 
Sweeney of Newark, N.J. 
12-45 Bible Study. 

Oct. 19.— Stockbridge Club, 6-45 p.m. 
in Agricultural Recitation 
Room. 



KODAKS 



AND 



BROWNIES 

PHOTO GRAPHIC SU PPtlES 

Be sure you get an 

EASTHAN F1LH 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 



m 



Makers 
of 



& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 




Deuel's Drug Store 




COLlE CE barber : shop 

AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



There are seven good reasons 



why YOU should buy 



COAL 



SUNDAY MORNING ADDRESS 

[Continued 'rom first page] 



OK 



C. R. ELDER 



FELLOWS! 

FOR YOUR 
SUPPLIES, CANDY, 
TONIC, etc. 

VISIT THE 

Aggie 
Store 

Basement of North College 

E. FRAHK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Yean the 8tan<lanl of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN RRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(Basic Slag Phosphate.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric 
Acid and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 95'! Pure 

POTASH SALTS. 



worked in his childhood on a farm in 
the pure, fresh air. There can be no 
comparison between farm work and 
work in the stuffy air of a factory. 
The long hours wreck the child labor- 
ers' health so that he is liable to fall 
victims to some disease. Some people 
ask 'Who will perform our unskilled 
labor if we educate the ignorant classes 
above it?' The answer Is, There is 
no unskilled labor. All work would be 
done better If those engaged In It were 
trained. If the ignorant street clean- 
ers of our cities were but trained, the 
lower hospital expenses that would 
result would more than pay for the 
price of skilled labor. A plea of those 
who advocate ehild labor is that it pre- 
vents the raising of a class of idlers. 
The truth is that a great percentage of 
street loafers and tramps is composed 
of men who worked in childhood and 
consider themselves entitled to rest for 
the remainder of their days. Until 
now the farming class has not been 
concerned directly with child labor. 
But the coming of great canneries with 
their armies of child workers has 
brought the matter home to farmers. 
It is your duty, men, when you go out 
and have influence, to stamp out this 
curse. Every institution of learning 
is supported indirectly by hard-working 
children through taxes levied on the 
state. Children have no chance to 
rise, and men will work perhaps all 
their lives at the poorly-paid occupa- 
tion in which they started in childhood. 
It is up to you college men to end this 
Injustice toward those children that 
help give you your advantages. Let 
us see to it that a square deal is given 
every child under the American flag." 




Fertilizer Literature ia sent Free of Charge 
you mention the College Siuhal. 



If 



THE C0E-1RT1P1ER CO. 

24-26 Stone Street, NEW YORK. 



COLLEGE UNITY 

President Lowell, In his address, 
emphasized the value and effect of 
college solidarity. He said in part : 

••The object of the undergraduate 
department is not to produce hermits, 

but men fitted to take their places in 
the community and live in contact with 
their fellow men. The college of the 
old type possessed a solidarity which 
enabled it to fulfill that purpose well 
enough in its time, although on a nar- 
rower scale and a lower plane than we 
aspire to. It was so small Ifaftl the 
students were all well acquainted with 
one another, or at least with their 
classmates. Before the end of the 
nineteenth century election in some 
form was introduced into all our col- 
leges. But the new method brought a 
divergence in the courses of study pur- 
sued by individual students, an intel- 
lectual isolation, which broke down 
the old solidarity. 

'•To that disintegration the over- 
shadowing interest in athletic games 
appears to be partly due. I believe 
strongly In the physical and moral 
value of athletic sports, and I believe 
that their exaggerated prominence is 
to be attributed to the fact that such 
contests offer to students the one com- 
mon interest, the only striking occa- 
sion for a display of college solidarity. 
— Williams Record. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 

with the 

BEST UNFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Stylos are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



" For the Land's Sake." 



Successful crop growing rests, first, on a rich 
soil, available fertility. When the available plant 
food has been exhausted, what is the remedy? Will 
manure supply all that is needed? Will phosphate 
rocks or slags supply food available for plants? 
What treatment makes good plant food from inert 
sources, like raw bone, tankage, etc., and why? 

Study the plant food problem. 



B0WKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum ai\d High Streets, 



Hartford, Coi\i\. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Hushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkr S. Garde. 



£&rp*rvter 3c Morehous?, 



PRI 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst; Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 12, 1909. 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Rain Cloth, $3-S° P er )'d. Trouserings, 



I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



$12.50 

$11.50 

$10.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

*3-5° Per yard. 



N 



A. P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

03^ Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



witb a full line of College Supplies 



may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQ5 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



flOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins 5<x-ts. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$ 1. 00 

6 " dates sets, pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3ct. pieces 5octs. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 " Broken Uank and Confederate 

Bills J1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mat! Auction Circulars an<l 
Stlllng price list. 



M. I). Gil. MAN. c. A. MOFFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Strebt. 

Worcester, Mass. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST., Boston. 



262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The total number of enrollment of 

of students, numbers up to date, 349. 

H. T. Roehrs has been elected 

Manager of the 1913 football team, 

and Lane of the basketball team. 

The presidents of the agricultural 
colleges of New England will hold a 
conference at Amherst on October 22. 
Mr. H. F. Thompson left Amherst 
Oct. 1 1 for Ashtabula, Ohio. He will 
attend the meeting of the National 
Greenhouse Vegetable Growers. 

Dr. H. T. Fernald is now preparing 
an exhibit to be shown at the New | 
England Fruit Show, which is to be 
held in Boston the last of this month. 
An interesting talk was given by 
Professor Elihu Grant of Smith Col- 
lege, at Y. M. C. A. on Thursday 
night. His subject was "The Max- 
imum Man." 

A mass meeting was held before Y. 
M. C. A. on Thursday night, to get 
more men out on the football field. 
The speakers were Capt. John Blaney 
and Coach Gage. 

The first copy of the 1911 Index 

went In today. The Andover 

Press of Andover is doing the work 

this year. The Index will be ready for 

sale soon after Dec. 15. 

Armstrong, S. C. Brooks, Clarke 
and Holland of the Senior Class judged 
the fruit at the Northampton Cattle 
Show on October 6. On October 8, 
they visited the Palmer Fair. 

The following officers of the Mette- 
wampa Club have been elected : Presi- 
dent, Dr. Percy L. Reynolds; vice- 
president, Fred C. Kenney; secretary 
and treasurer, Robert Duncan ; Chair- 
man of Executive Committee, A. V. 
Osmun. 

The shower baths between the drill 
hail and gun shed are now near com- 
pletion. As soon as the remainder of 
the equipment arrives the room will be 
put in serviceable condition. A num- 
ber of lockers will be placed in the gun 
shed. The need for such facilities in 
the drill hall has long been felt and will 
be much appreciated. 

Sept. 24th and 25th, Dr. H. T. Fer- 
nald attended the meeting of the Fed- 
erated Natural History Society of New 
England held in Springfield. He ex- 
hibited a collection of entomological 
specimens. The Zoological depart- 
ment finds itself under greater stress 
with each new Sophomore class. The 
lack of equipment is now greatly felt, 
which will make the new quarters ap- 
preciated most highly. 

The Sophomore class has elected 
the following officers : President, R. 
R. Parker; Vice-President, C. C. 
Pearson ; Secretary and Treasurer, L. 
F. Kingsbury; Class Captain, F. S. 
Merrill, Sergeant-at-Arms, H. H. 
Wood; Historian, E. B. Young; 
Editor-in-Chief, 1912 Index, A. C. 
Brett ; Business Manager of Index, F. 
A. Castle; Class Football Manager, 
E. S. C. Daniel; Captain, T. J. 
Moreau; Track Manager, R. Wales. 



The College Signal, Tnesday, October, 12, 1909. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

" THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



•*E. N. PARISEAU,.* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mut. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 

Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



H. WARREN 
<£ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 




PS 



THOMPSON 



SPORTING GOODS 

STORE 
and REPAIR SHOP. 

Rear First Nat. Hank. 



TYPEWRITERS 



For Sale or Rent. 



TENNIS GOODS 



FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 



GUNS and AMMUNITION 



HOCKEY SKATES and 



STICKS 



SNOW SHOES and 



SKIS. 



E. A. Thompson 



ANNIVERSARY NIGHT 

[Continued from first page] 

in point of service ; for the alumni. 
Mr Randall B. Warden, '98, Mr. 
Charles White, '09 and Dr. Theodore 
S. Bacon, '94. But. before permit- 
ting the speakers to proceed, President 
Butterfield, in a few words, thankea 
the trustees for the loyal support they 
have always accorded him, without 
which the state of cohesion and pro- 
gress realized during the last four years 
would have been impossible. 

Mr. Dickinson spok 1 at some length 
of the exercises in honor of President 
Lowell, Harvard's new leader — exer- 
cises dignified by the presence of world- 
eminent scholars. But, in the end, 
his theme was "Old Mass 'chusetts." 
"Boys," he said, " in every effort the 
trustees make to promote the welfare 
of the college, it is of you they are 
thinking. The college is growing rap- 
idly and will continue to grow still more 
rapidly ; and it is for the boys to see 
to it that habits of industry and codes 
of honor become proportionate to its 
progress. Thus will its students and 
alumni rank equally in the future, as 
they have in the past, with any in the 
Commonwealth." 

Mr. Ward's address was an enlarge- 
ment of the theme dwelt upon by the 
preceding speaker— the fair name and 
fame of M. A. C, and the scarcely to 
he rivalled opportunities it now affords 
for agricultural and industrial educa- 
tion. For three reasons shall the stu- 
dents prize their Alma Mater ; because 
of its opportunities; because of its 
name, Massachusetts, and because the 
name " agricultural " is the foundation 
J of life and industries in all lands. 

The remarks of Mr. Warden, Mr. 
White, Mr. Bacon and also of Mr. 
Bowker, who responded to a special 
invitatiion from the president to speak, 
were, essentially, repetitions of what 
had already been said. One state- 
ment of Mr. Warden's, however, 
brought up a question which Is of gen- 
eral interest to the students— the ques- 
tion of equipped athletic grounds. Mr. 
Warden's advice to the students was 
to keep hammering at the trustees till 
they should secure from the legislature 
money to purchase such grounds ; to 
whom the president replied that the 
trustees needed no hammering, for not 
only had they secured five thousand 
dollars from the legislature but had 
also added, privately, ten thousand 
more, wherewith suitable grounds had 
been purchased. 

At the close of the event Dr. Lind- 
sey offered the following resolutions 
which were unanimously adopted : 
Hon. T. P. Root, Buire, 
Wm. R. Sessions. Springfield. 

The trustees, faculty, alumni and 
student body, assembled in Draper 
Hall for the purpose of celebrating an- 
niversary night, send you greetings and 
best wishes and express their high ap- 
preciation of your services during the 
many years in which you served as a 
trustee of M. A. C. 

Music was furnished by the college 
orchestra and by a quartet composed 
of members of the glee club. 



T. JU. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Repair Work. 



Rfc-AR OF AMHERdT HOUSE! 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Preiser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits .and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Kent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings. 

Come Harly and get Satisfaction. 
Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 12, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 12, 1 



\\V^M^///////////////WWWV i . 





. . . , v V V V •" '»' V • V • V V- • 




GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



£\ English and Scotch Woolens. 

_ i^S. THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

4 CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 

....,..,................•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•••••.•■•••■•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

EXPERIMENT STATION 

Philip V. Goldsmith, assistant chem- 
ist in the experiment station for the 
past two years, has resigned to accept 
a position with the Cuban American 
Sugar Company of New York. For 
the present he will be located in Cuba. 
Mr. Goldsmith was graduated from the 
Michigan agricultural college with the 
class of 1907. 



909. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Miss. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUB STORE. ]\\, g. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 



COLLEGE SHOEIMKER _ „_ ,,.»,.,.„ „, „_ 

J ^/\/ # f DAVIS. Cut flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



Fine Krpairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



E.B OICKINSOND. D.S. 

Phoenix Row r»K?*TAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59—4- 

<;as pitting, tinning. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



Office Hours: 

x* t« » iu: a. ivi. Litoton E».ftf. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



LIBRARY. 

The Library has recently completed 
to date its files of the following period- 
icals : American Botanist, American 
Review of Reviews, Country Life in 
America, Garden Magazine, Market 
Growers Journal, Technical Magazine 
and The World's Work. 

Considerable effort is being made to 
complete the files of other publications. 
Some of those needed most are: The 
Independent prior to 1900; The Out- 
look prior to 1897; The World To- 
day, vols. 1-5; Charities ind the Com- 
mons, vols. 1-15; The Outing Maga- 
zine prior to 1908; and Bulletins and 
Circulars of the various Bureaus of the 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture. The Librarian will be very glad 
to hear from anyone who has any of 
the above for disposal. 

Information concerning any of the 
above will be gladly received. 

Wanted by the Library of the Mass. 
Agr. College : 

1. American Agriculturist, vols. 3- 
15. 

2. American Horse Breeder prior 
to 1907. 

3. American Journal of Sociology, 
v. 1-12. 

4. Breeders Gazette : Dec. 2, 
1902. 

5. Education: October, 1881, and 
March, 1892. 

6. Journal of Political Economy, 
v. 1-16. 

7. Popular Science Monthly : Sup- 
plements 1-13. 

8. Reports of the Farmers Na- 
tional Congress. 

9. The National Grange, vol. 1 ; 
vol. 2, Nos. 1-16; vol. 3, No. 4. 

10. U.S. Geological Survey Bulle- 
tins. 

Charles R. Green, Librarian. 



the past summer in carrying out this 
work. 

During the spring approximately 
1 ,000 samples of fertilizers were col- 
lected In the state. The work of 
examination has been In progress 
throughout the summer and is nearing 
completion. The results will be ready 
for publication within six weeks. 

The autumn irspection of cattle 
feeds is now in progress and will con- 
tinue until about the first of November. 
Between four and five hundred samples 
will probably be collected and exam- 
ined. As soon as possible, the results 
will be published in a bulletin. 

The station is doing considerable 
work in testing pure bred cows now. 
Applications for this work have come 
in earlier than usual. There are about 
70 Jersey and Guernsey cows under 
yearly tests. Four men are engaged 
in making reven to fourteen day tests 
for Holstein-Friesian breeders. Work 
of this character tends to increase. 



J. H. TROTT 




Insurance on Students' 
Furniture, Etc, £1.00 per 
$100. for 3 years while in any 
College or private building. 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



W. R. BROWN 



PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 

E. B. Holland is distributing to 
those interested in such work a pamph- 
let on methods of fat analysis. It con- 
tains the results of his investigations 
worked out at the station relative to 
the most suitable methods to be em- 
ployed in this work. 

An interesting piece of work on 
insecticides is being carried on by 
Mr. Holland in co-operation with the 
Entomological Department of the sta- 
tion. Chemically pure insecticides 
are being prepared and the effect of 
water and temperature on their solubil- 
ity will be carefully observed. Prof. 
S. F. Howard of the college has 
co-operated with Mr. Holland during 



HORTICULTURE. 

Arrangements have been completed 
t r a student's judging and packing con- 
•est to be held at the New England 
Fruit Show to be held in Boston Octo- 
ber 19th to 24th. The contests will 
include the judging of all the plates 
shown — Baldwin, Gravenstein, Hub- 
bardston, Mcintosh, Wealthy, North- 
ern Spy, Rhode Island Greening and 
Roxbury Russet : the judging of ap- 
ples packed in boxes and barrels, and 
the packing cf a box and barrel by 
each contestant. It will be held under 
the auspices of the New England 
Federation of Agricultural Students 
and teams from Maine, Vermont, 
New Hampshire and Massachusetts 
will compete. 

An exhibition similar in size and 
variety to that of 1908 was exhibited 
at the Hampshire Fair. 

The department furnished an exhibit 
for the county fair at Northampton. 
Mr. Thompson judged the vegetables. 
About twenty students have been 
given work since the opening of col- 
lege and the department will probably 
be able to furnish work for some time 
to come. 

ENGLISH. 

The department Is considering a 
proposal to join Cornell (Agricultural) 
in the formation of a triangular debat- 
ing league. 

There but four hours a week at 
which the English recitation room Is 
not occupied for English exercises, 
and fifteen exercises a week are con- 
ducted elsewhere. 

Mr. Green has completed his lec- 
tures upon the use of the library, given 
as part of the sophomore courses in 
English. 

The elections in sophomore English 
are: Theme-writing, 80 men; public 
speaking, 60 men. The total num 
ber of hours of credit elected In 
theme-writing is 102; in public speak 
Ing 64. Twenty-three out of 33 one- 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chrysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4. A.M. 

BE SURE 

you see the Agents for the Amherst 
Co-op Laundry, 

J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 
Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry 

Cleaning and Pressing. 



hour men have elected to do all their 
required English in the first semester, 
thus earning exemption from the sec- 
ond-semester requirement. 

In agricultural journalism, 6 men 
are enrolled; In periodical writing, 14 
men. Three men are taking both 
courses. 

The following addition to the first 
paragraph (on substitutions and equiv- 
alents), page 15, English Bulletin for 
1907-08, is announced: "provided, 
that at the discretion of the instructor, 
work upon student periodicals may be 
accepted instead of class papers in 
periodical writing, the amount of credit 
such work is to receive being deter- 
mined by the instructor." 

Under this provision, a student in 
the course in periodical writing may 
receive a limited amount of credit for 
work upon the Signal. 



A BRILLIANT VICTORY 

I Continued fiom first page.] 

wich made 5 and 9 yards, then Blaney 
threw them for a loss. Norwich punted 
to our 40. Roberts punted to Nor- 
wich 30, Hubbard making a fine 
tackle. Norwich lost 2. Goodnough 
replaced Blaney. Norwich lost 7 on 
their fake pass, then punted to Morse 
on our 50 line. Hazen replaced Put- 
man. A five yard gain, then a punt 
to the visitor's 15 mark. Reed re- 
turning it 20 yards. Norwich made 5, 
2, and 6. Moreau in at full. Good- 
nough threw Norwich for a 1 0-yard loss. 
Norwich punted to the middle of the 
field. We made 5 through tackle, but 
were penalized for offside. McGarr 
in place of Powers. Massachusetts 
fumbled, but on Norwich's first play 
Hubbard threw his man for a six yard 
loss, and on the second Goodnough got 
his man seven yards to the bad. Time 
up. Score 6-0. 

Several changes were made in the 
line-up, with a view to trying out new 
men. Of these, Goodnough showed well 
at half, a new position for him. Our new 
3nds, Hubbard and O'Brien, as well as 
the tackles and backs, tackled hard and 
often. Hayden blocked several kicks, 
and played a strong game generally, 
but showed a tendency to pass to high 
for good kicking. Reed and Schako- 
wskidid most of the work for Norwich. 

FIRST HALF. 

M. A. C. U. N 

Rushes and return of punts, 88-yds. 16-yds. 
First downs made. 4 5 

Average distance punted. 45-yds. 35-yds. 
Penalties inflicted, 20 15 

SECOND HALF. 

M. A. C. N. U. 

Rushes and return of punts. 80-yds. 70 yds. 
First downs made. 4 2 

Average distance punted, 45-yds. 35-yds. 



Penalties Inflicted, 

mass. a c 
O'Brien. 1. e., 
Leonard, 1. t., 
Powers, 1. g.. 
McGarr, 1 g. 
Hayden, c, 
Walker, r. g.. 
Hazen, Putnam, r. g. 



5-yds. 6-yds. 

NORWICH 

r. e., Kelley 

r. t , Smith 

r. g , Underhil! 

c, Campbell 
1. g.. Starr 



ATTENTION! 



There area few Copies of the "1910 Index" 



still on hand. We are anxious to close them out at 



the earliest possible date. 



1913 



This is your chance to start your set of "Indexes" 
published by the classes that are in college with yon. 
It will be impossible to secure a copy of the book by 
December 1st, if the sales continue as they have been 
going. If books 



ARE WANTED 



Place an early order with 



FRANK T. HAYNES 



8 South College 



OR TIIK 



AGGIE STORE 



See Sample at the "Aggie Store." 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 12, 1909- 



Do you want Security for Horrowing 

Money to continue your College 

( 'ourse? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form a/ Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS.luTUAL life 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving 0. Davis, djent I -' Xarth 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Stalisticsof Its growth. 1898 to 1908 

1. Total Receipts: From 1898 to 1908 there was a steady increase in the total re- 
ceipts of the College. In the first five years of this period, they increased about 
! 35%, and in the latter five years, nearly 45% more - makmg a total of approximately 

80% in the ten years. 

2. Inventory of Buildings: From 1898 to 1903 the value of the College buildings 
increased about 30%; during the five years which followed, the increase was over 
60%. 

3. Total Inventory: The increase in total inventory, including land, buildings, and 
equipment, was not especially great, there being an increase of 42% from 1898 to 
1903, and an additional increase from 1903 to 1908, of 43%. 

4. Number of Instructors: The teaching force of the College increased 55% in this 
decade, the additions to the faculty coming gradually during the period. 

5. Number of Four-years' Students: The annual increase in number of regular 
students from 1898 to 1903 was slightly over 8%; the annual increase for the following 
five years was between 22% and 23%, the total increase being 158%. 

6. Total Enrolment: Under this head the most striking indication of the growth 
of the Institution is noted. In 1903 the total enrolment had increaesd 60% over 
that of five years previous. Erom 1903 to 1908 there was an increased attendance 
of 355%, making a total increase in all departments of the College 415% for the 
ten year period. 

SUMMARY. 
Approximate Percent of Increase. 



Allen Bros. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol.. XX. 



ii 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 19, 1909. 



No. 5 



Contractors & Builders. aw -nc field plans N safei y gives tech game first informal dance 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



CARS 



Total Receipts 
Inventory of Buildings 
Total Inventory 
Number of Instructors 
Number of Four-years' Students 
Total Enrolment 



1898-1903 

35 
30 
4* 
3° 

43 
60 



1903-1908 

45 
60 

43 

25 
i'5 
355 



898-1908 
80 

90 

85 

55 

,58 

415 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Leave AOQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOLE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST lor AGQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Ratea 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. IT. CO, 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Tennis Association, 



William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

R. H. Allen, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr.. Manager 

R. S. Eddy. Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen. President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 



Amherst, Mass. 

F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



1. t.. M. Smith 
1. e., Burnett 
q. b.. Murray 
r. h. b , Caswell I 
1. h b., Schakowski i 



Schermerhorn, r. t., 

Hubbard, r. e., 

Morse, q. b., 

Hosmer, 1. h. b., 

Blaney, r. h. b., 

Coodnough, r. h. b., 

Roberts, f. b.. f. b.. Reed 

Moreau. f. b. 

Score. Massachusetts A. C. 6. Touch- 
down. Hosmer. Goal from touchdown, 
Morse. Umpire, Barney of Syracuse. 
Referee, Dr. Collins of Northampton. 
Field judge. Heald of Dartmouth. Lines- 
men, Urban and Slattery. Time, 20 and 
15m periods. 

COMING FOOTBALL GAMES 
SATURDAY OCT. 16 

M. A. C. vs. Worcester Tech at 

Amherst. 
Amherst vs. Tufts at Amherst. 
Dartmouth vs. Williams at Hancver. 
Holy Cross vs. Trinity at Worcester. 
Navy vs. Villa Nova at Annapolis. 
Univ. Maine vs. Harvard at Cambridge. 
Union vs. Hobart at Geneva. 
Univ. of Vt. vs. Wesleyan at Middle 

town. 
Brown vs. U. of P. at Philadelphia. 
Cornell vs. Fordham at Ithaca. 
Yale vs. Army at West Point. 



The Commercial Imperial Embassay 
of Japan, which has been touring the 
country during the past summer, will 
visit college on October 26. 



When Fitting Oat Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. B. Roberts. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424- 1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



M 



Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'90. — Jose M. Herrero, Diario de 
la Marina Redactor; Frado y Ten- 
iente Rey, Habana. Mr. Herrero 
visited college ten days ago for the first 
time since he left the country in 1890. 

'97. — p, H. Smith, in charge of 
the feed and dairy control at the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural Experiment 
Station, has recently received the offer 
of an attractive position as dairy chem- 
ist in connection with the Missouri 
Experiment Station located at Colum- 
bia. Mr. Smith has the matter under 
consideration. His many friends 
would much regret his departure from 
the college and the town. 

'04. — Married at Washington, 
D. C, on Sept. 26, Dr. Clarence H. 
Griffin and Miss Elizabeth Babette. 
At home, 3438 Mt. Pleasant St., 
Washington. 

'06.— Richard Wellington will spend 
three weeks' vacation at Waltham, 
Mass., commencing Oct. 17. 

'08.— Born, Aug. 25, to Mr. and 
Mrs. S. J. Wright, a daughter, Caro- 
line Farrar. 



President 
1 



.etter Explains. 
ts Buy Land 
or Field. 



The A Bad Pass Looses Game For Us 
Tech Much Heavier, While Our 
Line Shows Weakness. 



Last v er the trustees asked the 
legislature tor an appropriation of 
$15,000, i' the purchase of lard to 
be used c fly for the purposes of an 
athletic field and recreation ground. 
Options on a considerable amount of 
land to the south of the college had 
been secured, and soon after the bill 
was presented, options on still further 
parcels were secured, so that when we 
came to the final hearings, we demon- 
strated that it would take $25,000, to 
purchase the land we need. We felt 
quite sure that the legislature would 
give us at least the first amount asked 
for, and were bitterly disappointed 
when the appropriation for this purpose 
was limited to $5500. 

Under these conditions, it became a 
rather serious question as to the best 
policy to follow. It was quite certain 
that when some of the options expired, 
they could not be renewed, and that 
the land would pass into other hands. 
At this crisis, a number of the trustees 
came to the rescue of the project, and 
on their own responsibility purchased 
some of the land that was needed, 
holding it in trust for the college. 
This enabled the college to purchase 
directly certain other parcels of land 
with the legislative appropriation. 

The status of the matter, therefore, 
is about as follows: The college and 
the trustees together now own a con- 
siderable proportion of the land needed 
for an enclosed field. It will be 
necessary now to go to the legislature 
with a request for an appropriation suf- 
ficient to enable the college to take 
this land off the hands of the trustees, 
and into the direct ownership of the col 
college ; for the purchase of other land 
on which the college has an option, 
to enable it to make satisfactory 
exchanges of property with some of 
the land owned by fraternities. It is 
believed that the legislature will accede 
to this request, and if they do, the 
college will possess a site for an 
enclosed athletic field hardly equalled 
in New England. 

Unfortunately, the action of the 
legislature last winter make it doubtful 
whether we can develop in connection 
with the athletic field the requisite 
recreation ground for the whole body 
of students. We took to the legisla- 
ture a project for a recreation ground 
sufficient for all students in a college 
of approximately 1,000 men. The 
clear trend of physical education in 
colleges is that all the men shall play 
some outdoor games throughout the 

[Continued oa page 81 



FIRST HALF 



Rushes and return of punts 
First downs made 
Average distance sun ted 
Penalties inflicted 
Fumbles 



M. A. C. W. F. I. 

55 yds 160 yds 

6 

35 yds 35 yds 

25 yds 1 5 yds 

2 



SECOND HALF 

Rushes and return of punts 1 55 yds 60 yds 

First downs made 8 1 

Average distance punted 40 yds 40 yds 

Penalties Inflicted 

Fumbles I 

Coming back strong in the second 
half, determined to shake off the persis- 
tant "hoodoo" of the first period; 
running the kick-off back to the mid- 
dle of the field ; and crashing through 
the visitor's line for big gains, it 
seemed for a time that our men would 
surely overcome the two point lead of 
the Worcester eleven and finally win 
out. But Tech was equally deter- 
mined that this should not be and held 
like a stone wall whenever their goal 
was threatened. 

Saturday afternoon could not have 
been called an ideal day for football. 
A cold wind blew across the field dur- 
ing the entire game, not only bothering 
the kickers, but also adding to the 
difficulty of catching and passing the 
ball. Old style football was the rule. 
The few on-side kicks and forward 
passes that were tried went askew and 
both teams were compelled to resort to 
line plays almost entirely. Our men 
were considerably outweighed by the 
visitors, especially on the line and it 
was mainly because of this fact that 
Tech's plays netted such large gains. 
The only score of the game was a 
pair of points on a safety which went to 
Tech. This score resulted from a low 
pass from Hayden which went through 
Roberts' hands. The ball bounded 
across the goal line where Roberts re- 
covered it but was downed for a safety. 
It was just seven minutes past three 
when Roberts kicked off for Massachu- 
setts. He sent the ball over the goal 
line from whence it was carried out 
and put in play by the Institute on her 
own 25 yard line. The visiting back 
immediately got into action and soon 
had the ball in the middle of the field. 
Here a penalty for offside play com- 
pelled Clough to punt, Morse running 
back to kick to our own 35 yard line. 
Two plays into the line yielded 7 yards 
and Roberts attempted an on-side 
kick. The kick was blocked and it 
was Teclrs ball on our 40 yard line. 
After several small gains, Clough 
dropped back for a try at goal. The 
kick was blocked, Powers recovering 
for M. A. C. An exchange of punts 



[Continued on page 4.] 



A Great Success. About Fifty Couple 

Present. Hall Prettily 

Decorated. 

Last Saturday afternoon and even- 
ing the college, or at least a large part 
of it, turned out "on the light, fantas- 
tic toe," for the occasion of the year's 
first Informal Dance. There wert 
about fifty couples present. The Drill 
Hall has been remodeled and painted 
white since last year. The celling has 
been lowered and the heating pipes pro- 
tected. Decoration is a much easier 
matter. The decorations of light 
yellow were tasteful and attractive and 
the committee is to be congratulated 
on them. The stand for the or- 
chestra was placed in the center of 
the floor, the platform being banked 
with palms and foliage-plants. A 
promenade was curtained off at the 
north end of the hall by a huge Ameri- 
can flag, suspended from the ceiling. 
The white walls were hung with count- 
less Massachusetts banners as well as 
with pennants of other colleges. At 
the south end of the hall was the pat- 
ronesses' corner with a background of 
the Stars and Stripes and displays of 
palms and box-wood. Hemlock and 
box-wood relieved the entrances ami 
the promenade flag. Strips of light- 
yellow bunting were draped from the 
three arc- lights, which were down the 
center of the room, to the walls, mak- 
ing a soft and very pretty effect. Ex- 
cellent music was furnished by Der- 
rick's Westfield Orchestra. Dancing 
was begun at four o'clock and laftea 
into the evening with an intermission 
for supper which was served at Draper 
Hall. The committee in charge of 
the dance consisted of R. H. Allen, 
Chairman; E. H. Turner, Treasurer; 
R. A. Waldron. W. E. Leonard, 
R. P. Armstrong, S. W. Mendum, 
L. S. McLaine. 

The patronesses for the evening were 
; Mrs. Buiterfield and Mrs. J. B. Paige 
j of Amherst, Miss Heine of Smith and 
Miss Edgerton of Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege. Those who attended : 

Mr. Henri Haskins, R. H. Allen, 
R. P. Armstrong, S. W. Mendum, 

E. H. Turner, W. E. Leonard, R. A. 
Waldron, W. C. Johnson, L. C. 
Brown, H. W. French, J. N. Everson, 

F. H. Partridge, R. S. Eddy, W. M. 
S. Titus, H. A. Brooks, R. E. Annls, 
H. R. Francis, W. A. Cloues, L. 
Brandt, F. T. Haynes, J. P. Blaney, 

G. W. Paulsen, L. S. McLaine, L. S. 
Dickinson, F.D. McGraw, H.B. Morse, 
R. L. Whitney, N. H. Hill, H. W. 
Blaney, A. H. Sharpe, H. H. Home. 
E. L. Winn, L. 0. Stevenson, D. G. 
Tower, W. E. Philbrick, F. B. Hills, 

[Continued oa page 5.] 



ASSEMBLY 

President Creelman Takes College By 

Storm. Vigorous Address Fol 

lowed By Long Yell. 



Mass, Mass, Mass'chusetts, rah, 
rah, rah, rah, Mass'chusetts, Creel- 
man, Creelman, Creelman! 

Mass, Mass. Mass'chusetts, rah, 
rah, rah, rah. Mass'chusetts, Ontario, 
Ontario, Ontario ! 

That was the sentiment of the col- 
lege and It was expressed with a vigor 
that shook the roof of the old chapel. 
President Creelman of the Ontario 
Agricultural college of Guelf, Ontario, 
nad just given a short talk during 
assembly Wednesday afternoon, and at 
its conclusion the students rose In a 
mass to cheer for their sister college 
and her distinguished president. 
There was not a dull moment during 
the entire forty minutes, for President 
Creelman kept the meeting In such 
gales of laughter over his good-natured 
sallies, that at times he was scarcely 
able to make himself heard. He 
referred humorously to the fair co-eds 
at Ontario as he sketched the purpose 
and accomplishments of his own Insti- 
tution and of agricultural colleges In 
general. 

" 1 he purpose of an agricultural col- 
lege is not to make better farmers but 
to make farmers better. A college 
has either got to reach out and bring 
the farmer, the man on the back fifty, 
in to the college, or else It has got to 
go to him. With the size of your col- 
lege and the amount of work it must 
do. it's simply Impossible to get out to 
him. You've got to attract him here. 
If, by the time you leave college, 
every man here does not know the 
common flowers, weeds, birds, trees 
and Insects around this region you men 
have wasted your time. You have 
lost something." 

President Creelman then spoke of 
his long acquaintance with President 
Butterfield and lamented the fact that 
he had not been able to visit "Old 
Mass'chusetts" before, for her fame 
had spread throughout the western 
world as a leader In agriculture. He 
modestly refused to take credit to him- 
self for the remarkable growth of his 
own college in Canada, but after listen- 
ing to President Creelman's vigorous 
and forceful words for only a short 
time, the student body was quick to 
recognize him not only as a dreamer 

; of dreams but a doer of great deeds. 

I 

One hundred and twenty-five fresh- 
men registered for the Cornell 1913 
crew. Last year, seven men rowing 
on the 191 1 freshmen crew made the 
champion varsity eight oar. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 19, 1909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R.CLARKE. 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE, 1911, 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910, 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. 191 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Asst. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 

1, College Notes. 



SIGNAL OFFlCB HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1 - 1 5 p. m . 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30. 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday. 6-30 to 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9-15 to 10a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. M. 
Thursday 11-15 to 12 «. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1. Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODCE, 1912. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Application pending. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY, OCT. 19. No. 5 



Saturday's game was disappointing 
but, still, it shouldn't be, with two 
men out because of injuries and the 
whole team, in fact, a little upset, we 
could not expect anything but what 
was given us. Fellows, it's always on 
the bright side for us ; we are too busy to 
look back. The team goes to Williams- 
town next Saturday, that's our aim. 
It as a sore defeat last year but just 
watch the Aggie team this season. 



Mass: Rah: Rah: Rah: Creel- 
man. His intensely interesting speech 
on Wednesday was surely appreciated 
by the students and the long yell that 
followed his talk can only partially 
express it. His broad scope of knowl- 
edge and his grasp of essential ideas 
appealed to the men of M. A. C. as 
no other speaker in our remembrance 
has done. We have men like Presi- 
dent Creelman to thank for putting 
Agriculture where it Is, today, in the 
world of science. 



The President's letter puts the Ath- 
letic Field situation up to the public 
in a better light, especially from the 
students' standpoint. We see our 
ambition before us and we know if all 
goes well our sister classes at least 
will enjoy it. The action of the 
Trustees in buying the extra land is 
too great a one, to put our thanks in 
an editorial way, but we want them to 
feel that we appreciate it. It is here 
suggested that the student body take 
suitable action to show this. 



When the Signal Board started 
this year, it did so with the idea of 
"The best for M. A. C." Now in 
giving the college and its life a general 
survey, we feel that there is one thing 
that is not satisfactory to every one. 
This is the system of general over- 
sight of managers and their accounts. 
The administration may deem it un- 



wise to allow the student managers 
full control and, in fact, it does place 
too much responsibility upon one man. 
Yet on the other hand the students are 
not satisfied to allow a member of the 
faculty to have complete control. The 
question is, what's to be done? One 
thing that should stand hard and fast 
is that the different organizations 
should work together in every 
particular. The idea of an Auditing 
Committee composed of Alumni, Stu- 
dent manager and Faculty is a good 
one. If this committee were given 
power to handle all funds and also to 
approve all bills, a beneficial result 
would certainly be assured. This 
would lighten the responsibilities of 
the manager and yet such a committee 
would be in a position to see the 
affairs as they exist in the students' 
eyes. This is a big question ; let's 
all think it over and await development. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Oct. 20—1-15 p. m. Assembly. Phi 
Kappa Phi Oration, Hon. 
Frank A. Hosmer of Am- 
herst. Subject — "Anglo- 
Saxon Freedom and 
American Citizenship." 
3-15 p. m. Finals in Fresh- 
man Tennis Tournament. 
7-00 p. m. Debating Club 
in Chapel. 

Oct. 21—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. in 
Chapel. Leader, Dr. P. 
L. Reynolds. 

Oct. 23 — Mettawampe Trek to Hol- 
land Glen. Take B. & 
M. 12-54 train for Pansy 
Park. 

Oct. 24 — 9-15 a. m. Sunday morn- 
ing service in Chapel. 
Robert D. Woods of 
Boston. 

Oct. 26—7-00 p. m. Stockbrldge 
Club in Agricultural Lec- 
ture Room. Talk by 
Henry D. Smith of 
Rockland. 



THE PRESIDENT TO GIVE THE 

CAREW LECTURES 

The Carew Course of Lectures at 
the Hartford Theological Seminary 
will be given this year by President 
Kenyon L. Butterfield of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. The 
course will consist of five lectures on 
the general subject of "The Church 
and the Rural Problem," and will be 
given on the following dates: 
Tuesday, Oct. 19, The Rural Problem. 
Wednesday, Oct. 27, The Solution of 

the Rural Problem. 
Tuesday, Nov. 2, The Task of the 

Country Church. 
Tuesday, Nov. 9, Difficulties and 

Suggestions. 
Tuesday, Nov. 16, The Call of the 

Country Parish. 



Dr. James B. Angell retired last 
week from the presidency of Michigan, 
after thirty-eight years in that office. 



RELIABLE FOOTWEAR 

In deciding where to buy your footwear while in town 
choose 

THE SHOE STORE THAT ALWAYS MAKES GOOD 

This Store was established in 1854 and has been under the present manager 
ment nearly 19 years. It has always been a favorite place for M. A. C. Men 
to trade. We carry in stock the ELITE SHOE, $3.50 to $5.00, WHIT- 
MAN & KEITH SHOES I4.00 to $5.00, UPHAM BROS SHOES 
$5-oo to *6.oo, W. L. DOUGLAS SHOE $2.50 to $.400. 
TASCO the best $3.00 Shoe made. RUBBERS, TENNIS and 

SPORTING SHOES. REPAIRING. Very best workmaanship and ma- 
terials. 



JAMES F. PAGE 



Next to Post Office 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 




KODAKS 



AND 



BROWNIES 

PHOTO GRAPHIC SU PPLIES 

Be sure you get an 

EASTT1AN FILH 





Is 





FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <£ SHOE 
RERA I RING 



.AT 



LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

- LEVINE 

n 1-3 Amity St. Amherst. 



THURBER'S 

NKXT-TO-POBTOFTICB 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 





up" i 


t 


iUr^^^\£ 





* colle ce: barber shop 

AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 19, 1909. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 



I why YOU should buy 



GOAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 

FELLOWS! 

FOR YOUR 
SUPPLIES, CANDY, 
TONIC, etc 



VISIT THE 



Aggie 



Store 



Basement of North College 



E. FRAHK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Yearn the Standard of Excellence. 

GEHOIHE PEROVIAN GUANO 

The Eest Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAH BRAHD FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Pernvlan Guano Base 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(Basic Slag Phosphate.) 

The Cheapest and Beat Source of Phosphoric 
Acid and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, 9S% Pure 

POTASH SALTS. 

Fertilizer Literature i» sent Free of Charge If 
you mention the College Signal. 



THE GOE-iRTlER CO. 

24-26 Stone Street, NEW YORK. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The class pictures for the Index 
were taken last week. 

The Freshman Tennis Tournament 
will probably be finished this week. 
The men at present are up to the 
semi-finals. 

Dr. Reynolds' office hours will be, 
with the exception of Friday, from 8 
to 11-30 a. m. and on the campus 
from 3 to 6 P. m. 

Hazen '10 was severely Injured In 
Tuesday night's scrimmage and prob- 
ably will not be back at his old position 
as right guard this season. 

The Fruit Judging team started this 
morning for the Boston Show. The 
teams picked are : S.C.Brooks, W.R. 
Clarke and A. W.Holland for the judging 
and S. C. Brooks and W. R. Clarke for 
the packing team. These teams are to 
compete against University of Maine, 
University of Vermont and New 
Hampshire State. A silver cup Is to 
be given the winning team and also a 
cup for the highest individual scores. 

The speaker at the Sunday morning 
talk was Hon. A. T. Sweeney, of 
Newark, N. J., formerly judge of the 
Juvenial Court of that city. His talk 
was on the reformation of the Criminal 
Law and its proceedings. It was 
based upon President Taft's speech in 
Chicago last week, when he said "Our 
Criminal Law is a disgrace." Judge 
Sweeney's talk fitted well Into the 
series of Applied Christianity talks 
given this year. 

POULTRY ASSOCIATION MEET 

The first meeting of the Massachu- 
setts Poultry association was held 
Tuesday. Poultry men from all parts 
of the state were in attendance. In 
the evening of the same day Pres. 
George C. Creelman of the Ontario 
Agricultural college at Guelph, ad- 
dressed a joint meeting of the Poultry 
association and the Stockbridge club. 
His subject was "Organized Efforts 
in Agriculture." He stated that by 
organizing their efforts and combining 
their interests, both college and poultry 
dealers could secure increased and per- 
manent advantages. 

In Canada agricultural organization 
was effected forty years ago. The 
movement took the form of a society 
whose aims were to introduce new 
crops, to discuss agricultural questions 
and to hold annual fairs. The fairs 
proved particularly popular and were 
successfully financed. A further out- 
come of the movement was the found- 
ing of an experimental union whose 
members were composed of farmers; 
and, during this last year, the results 
of the experiments of eight thousand 
farmers were published. So large 
a number of results proceeding from 
so widely varied sources has proved 
most beneficial to the interests of agri- 
culture in Canada. 




'09. Turner, H. W., Estacion 
Agronomica, Santiago de las Vegas, 
Cuba. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CtOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Kail Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



The mixing of fertilizers takes into account 
geology, which tells of the formation and composition 
of soils ; chemistry, which shows the needs of crops 
and how they can be supplied ; botany, which tells of 
the structure of crops and their habits of growth; 
bacteriology, which treats of soil bacteria or soil-yeast, 
without which crops are bound to fail. Do not the 
lessons of the class room result in formulae parallel 
in a large degree, to the Srockbridge Special Fertili- 
zers ? 

Study the plant food problem. 



B0WKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum *n d High Streets, 



Hartford, Coi\i\. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Hushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. WaLTMM S. Gardk. 



C&rp*rvter & Morehouse, 



PRI 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 19, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tnesday, October, 19, 1909. 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL 



Ul 



If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $12.50 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $11.50 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $10.00 

Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $9.00 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Rain Cloth, - $3.50 per yd. Trouserings, - $350 per yard. 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



SAFETY GIVES TECH GAME 

[Continued from first page.] 



A. 



N 



R. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

&T Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, 



10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



witb a full line of College Supplies 



may be found at 



E WELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

ruqs 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



M. D. OILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 



C. A. MOFFET. 
1079-3. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins 5octs. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

#1.00 

6 

6 

6 



25 



dates 2Cts. pieces 5octs. 

dates 3ct. pieces socts. 

dates nickel cents 25cts. 

Broken Hank and Confederate 



Bills #1.00 

Semi for my Monthly Mail Auction Circulars and 
Selling price list. 



GILMAN and MOFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

•207 to 211 Main Strebt. 

Worcester, Mass. 



followed and then we were penalized 
5 yards for interference. The Wor- 
cester backs again started on a march 
for our goal line, B. Halligan reeling 
off several good runs around our left 
end. Again Clough tried a drop 
kick and again it went low, Morse 
recovering the ball on his own 8 yard 
line. Then came the play which 
resulted in the safety for Tech. 

Roberts punted out from our 25 
yard line but Tech fumbled and Hub- 
bard fell on the ball. Again Roberts 
punted to M. Halligan who was brought 
down by 'Hubbard's clean tackle. 
After several exchanges of punts and 
minor penalties, it was our ball on our 
own 27 yard line. A trick play was 
tried but we were penalized 15 yards 
for not carrying the ball out 5 yards on 
a quarterback run. Time was then 
called with the ball in our possession 
on our own 12 yard line. 

In the second half, Hosmer received 
Tech's kickoff and, aided by good in- 
terference, ran the ball back to the 
center of the field. Blaney, Scher- 
merhorn, Roberts and Hosmer then 
took turns carrying the ball through 
Tech's line for big gains, finally being 
held only 15 yards, from the goal line. 
The kicking game was again resorted 
to and we were gradually forced back 
to our line. Once more Clough tried 
a drop kick and once more he failed. 
Roberts punted out from his own 25 
yard line. Hosmer went out and 
Roberts shifted to half back, Moreau 
going in at full. The latter immedi- 
ately tore off two gains of 10 yds. 
each. Goodnough replaced Blaney 
and the two teams continued to see- 
saw back and forth up and down the 
field. Once Roberts tried a drop kick 
from Teck's 45 yd line but it was 
blocked. The only forward pass of 
the game was also attempted, by 
Tech, but it failed. The game ended 
soon after with the ball in Tech's pos- 
session on her own 15 yd. line. 
Line-up of teams and score :- 

c. 




MwTI. 



i 



A GOOD THING 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 



Wearers never worry because 
know that their shoes are 
right. 
Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 



they 



E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



j«E. N. PARISEAU,j« 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



W. P. I. 



M. A. 




COX SONS 



AND 



r. e., Hubbard 

r. t., Schermerhorn 

g., Putnam, McGarr 

c. Hayden 

1. g.. Powers, 

I. t., Leonard 

1. e., O'Brien 

q. b.. Morse 



Blaney, Goodnough 
b., Roberts. Moreau 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



HERBERT E. 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST 



MOREY 



Boston. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



Brown, 1. e. 
Gleason. 1. t. 
Fussell. 1. g. 
Sherman, c. 
Gillett, r. g. 
Clough, r. t. 
Waring, r. e. 
M. Halligan, q. b. 
B. Halligan, 1. h. b. 

1. h. b., Hosmer, Roberts 
Tuttle, Gray, r. h. b. 

r. h. b 
Powers, f. b. f 

Score— W. P. I. 2, M. A. C. 0. Safety- 
Worcester (Roberts. M. A. C.) Referee — 
Dr. Collins, Northampton. Umpire — Don- 
nelly, Worcester. Linesmen — Merrill and 
Urban. Time — 25 and 20-minute halves. 

That Boston reporter who disguised 
President Kenyon L. Butterfield of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural college 
as "President Hezekiah Butterworth," 
in a recent news report must have 
been a reader of "Zigzag Journeys" 
in his boyhood days. — Concord Monitor. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 



Before ordering your horses 
Proms and other occasions call 



for 



on 



F. H. WARREN 
c€ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 




THOMPSON 

SPORTING GOODS 

STORE 
and REPAIR SHOP. 

Rear First Nat. Hank. 



TYPEWRITERS 



For Sale or Rent. 



FISRT INFORMAL DANCE 

(Continued from first page.] 

E. I. Wilde, B. G. Southwick. A. F. 
Kingsbury, T. Hemenway, C. Walker, 
A. C. Brett, E. H. Cooper, H. F. 
Jones, G. Zabriskie, S. M. Jordan, 
H. T. Rhoers, H. W. Ryder, C. A. 
Shute. 



TENNIS GOODS 



FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 



GUNS and AMMUNITION 



HOCKEY SKATES and 



STICKS 



SNOW SHOES and 



SKIS. 



E. A. Thompson 



ASSOCIATION MEETING 

"I tell you men, it's better to be a 
saddle maker if you're called to sew 
saddles, then to be a minister when 
you're not called," said Mr. A. H. 
Evans of Northampton in addressing 
the association meeting. Mr. Evans 
drew his text from Mathew 9 : 9, deal- 
ing with the calling of Matthew the 
publican by Christ. "Some people 
think that we don't receive calls any- 
more. We do, as strongly as ever 
before. The Bible is the history of 
men who have heard God's call and 
obeyed. The call may come to any 
man in any business, it may come to 
you, but It- 1 that man be ready when 
it does ccme. The call may mean 
for you to drop your work or it may be 
that you can better serve him in it. 
Peter and Anlrew were good fishers, 
but the Lord called them to be 'fish- 
ers of men.' There was other work 
for Paul and he found it. I am 
reminded of a man who thought he 
was called to be a minister. He 
preached here and there, but could 
not hold his parishes. Today that 
man ownes a bakery and part of a city 
block. He makes the finest kind of 
bread. That man was called to be a 
baker. A man's business may inter- 
fere with God's; let him give it up as 
did Matthew the publican when called. 
The world's work must be done but if 
you do that which you are called to do 
all will be well. Ministers are not the 
only ones called. Indeed, I have 
known some who were not. What 
ever you do is sacred if done in God's 
name ; it's not so much what, but how 
you do it. 

And men, when you l;ave college 
don't be like a man I knew of. When 
he graduated the papers said that Mr. 
X had accepted a position. Ten years 
later that man was stiil hunting for a 
job. Don't be satisfied with a position 
for you have a calling. " 



INAUGURAL OF DR. NICHOLS 

Dartmouth's historic Wheelock 
punch bowl, symbol of the presidency, 
has changed hands and the college has 
acquired a new leader, Dr. Ernest Fox 
Nichols, scholar and scientist. Dart- 
mouth nestles peacefully among the 
New Hampshire hills and visitors 
rarely come in throngs; but last Thurs- 
day Hanover was taken by storm when 
distinguished men from this country 
and abroad assembled, two thousand 
strong, to witness and take part in the 
exercises relative to inducting the suc- 
cessor of Dr. Tucker into office. 

Dr. Nichols address was profound 
in thought and rigorous in expression. 



T. Iv. F»iVIOE> 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Repair Work . 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE! 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABR0V1TZ, 

Tailor and Presser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, . 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Rent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Harly and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $ 1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 11 Amity SL, Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 
and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS, 17th STREET <& LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 19, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 19, 1909. 






••• 

• •••••••■••••••••a 




• •••••••• ....•• 

V V V 

GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•-•.•.•.••■•••'•••••••••••'•••••••'•••'•■••'••'•••■•'•'• 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



THE OLD CORP 0B06 STORE. f\ t B. KINGMAN 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



! 'hot-nix Row 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone 59-4. 

GAS PITTING, l INNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

P LUMBE RS. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

CRUNCH Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

6Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



M. A. C. '82, , 

FLORIST 



Store Hunt's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 

E.B DICKINSON D. D S. 

DISNI^AL, ROOMt 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

< it i'i. 1 Hoiks: 

etoui a.. M.i.aotonp.M. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gu admin- 
stered when desired 



J. H. TROTT 



Insurance on Students' 
Furniture, Etc, $1.00 per 
$100. for 3 years while in any 
College or private building. 



W. R. BROWN 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



His were the words of a man versed 
in a knowledge of the educational 
issues of the past, who is probing deep- 
ly into those of the future. His sub- 
ject was "The Evolution in Educa- 
tion" and the presentation of it was 
replete with food for thought. By far 
his most noteworthy and pertinent 
statements were made with reference 
to the "Mental Apathy Class." 
These were his words: 

"What class of students in college 
causes us most concern? The real 
difficulty comes with the indifferent, 
idle, ambitionless man who often, by 
reason of native capacity or sound 
early training easily makes the passing 
man which technically puts him beyond 
the reach of formal dicipline and 
tempts envious chance no further. It 
is an open question whether the college 
has any obligation to help a small 
group of men who care so little to help 
themselves." One other statement 
should not pass unnoticed. "The 
college in all its relations is the most 
human and humanizing force in all 
our civilization. 'Twas the spirit ana 
truth in such words that, in the old 
days, fired the zeal of Pres. Eleazar 
Wheelock and, in the later days, trans- 
mitted to his successors the abounding 
and unflinching fidelity to the Alma 
Mater which has made the name 
'Dartmouth,' world-famous." 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

At the meeting of the Phi Kappa 
Phi at the Insectary on Oct. 1 I, three 
seniors were elected to membership, 
Dexter Edward Bailey of Tewksbury, 
Sumner Cushing Brooks of Amherst 
and Samuel Weis Mendum of Rox- 
bury. They will be admitted at the 
annual meeting to be held next June. 
A meeting will be held in April when 
other elections will possibly be made. 
At the meeting last week several 
amendments to the by-laws of the fra- 
ternity were passed upon. 

DEBATING 

The regular weekly meeting of the 
Debating Society was held last Wed- 
nesday evening in the Agricultural 
recitation room. A short business 
meeting was preceded by the custom- 
ary debate. The subject was, Re- 
solved, That divorce laws should b 
uniform throughout the United States. 
Mr. Waldron '10 and Mr. Patch '11 
spoke on the affirmative side, while 
Mr. Mendum upheld the negative. In 
the opinion of the judges, the negative 
side had the best of the argument. 

SATURDAY'S GAMES 

M. A. C. vs. Williams at Williams- 
town. 
Dartmouth vs. Amherst at Amherst. 
Bowdoin vs. Holy Cross at Worcester. 
Brown vs. Harvard at Cambridge. 
Cornell vs. Vermont at Ithaca. 
Princeton vs. Lafayette at Princeton. 
Tufts vs. Univ. of Maine. 
Union vs. Rochester at Schenectady. 
Yale vs. Colgate at New Haven. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH. 

The alterations in the Department 
offices have been completed enough to 
permit the rooms to be occupied, and 
after Tuesday the members of the 
Department will be able to resume 
their regular office hours. 

Nineteen-thirteen has its first ex- 
amination in English this week. Each 
section will be examined twice in the 
week. 

The Department received 400 
themes weekly, not counting examina- 
tion papers. 

In freshman composition, the first 
four weeks of the term have been de- 
voted to practise in punctuation and 
spelling; letter-writing is now being 
taken up. 

A number of reference-books have 
recently been added to the Depart- 
ment library in the English offices. 

Sophomore themes may be "any 
kind of news report, story, essay, or 
article, suitable for publication in any 
department of a newspaper, magazine, 
agricultural paper, or other periodical." 

The first installment of "Signal" 
competition papers has been turned 
over to the English Department for 
racking. 

FLORICULTURE. 

Professor White will lecture before 
the New Hampshire Horticultural So- 
ciety at their winter meeting in Peter- 
fa. ro, New Hampshire, October 28th. 
His subject will be "Home Gardens" 
and as this is a school session, he will 
also consider briefly some phases of 
school garden work. 

To-night he will speak before the 
Hardwick Grange on "Ornamental 
Trees and Shrubs." On January I Ith 
he will lecture before the Manchester 
Institute of Arts and Sciences at Man- 
chester, New Hampshire, on "Orna- 
mental Gardens and Graden Ma- 
terials." 

At a meeting of the Building Com- 
mittee of the Board of Trustees re- 
cently held at the College, It was de- 
cided to connect the old Durfee Range 
of greenhouses with the central heat- 
ing plant and to retain these houses for 
the present. It is expected that these 
houses will furnish material for practi- 
cal class exercises in reglazing and 
benching. The alumni of the College 
will be pleased, no doubt, to have these 
houses retained for a time, because 
of their many pleasant associations in 
connection with them. 

LIBRARY. 

J. C. Greene recently gave to the 
library a large number of books, gov- 
erment publications, and periodicals on 

\ ornithology. 

HORTICULTURE. 

J. C. Clark of North Hadley brought 

! two boxes of apples, October 1 1 , to 

1 the pomology department. These 

apples are to be packed by the fruit 

judging team for the New England 

Fruit Show. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



BOTANY. 

At the recent meeting of the New 
England Societies of Naturalists, Dr. 
G. E. Stone and Prof. A. V. Osmun 
had a display, showing methods for 
mounting exhibition materials. Dr. 
G. E. Stone will exhibit a collection 
of charts and specimens of plant dis- 
eases at the New England fruit show. 

CLARK HALL. 

October 19. 1909, 2 p. m. 

Progress in Soil Bacteriological In- 
vestigation.— A. V. Osmun. 

Oogonia in the Peronosphae.— Mr. 
Merrill. 

Enzymes in Plants. — Mr. G. H. 
Chapman. 

Influence of Electricity on Bacteria. 
—Dr. G. E Stone. 

On Oct&ter 22. the Mettawampe 
club will take a tramp to Belchertown, 
where they will visit the primeval 
forest in Holland Gien. 

The demand for certified m.lk has 
increased to such an extent that the 
college herd has had to be increased. 

The farm has harvested a good 
yield of the best quality of potatoes 
ever grown here. 

The farm department is giving work 
for quite a number of students. A 
commendable fact is that so many of 
the students are engaged so industri- 
ously in farm work. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY. 

There is to be an insect exhibit at 



LUNCHES 



returned to his work after a vacation 
of several weeks in Massachusetts. 

•94.__For the firm of Stockton and 
Gifford of Sutton, of which he is a 
member, J. E. Gifford has been exhib- 
iting Devon cattle at various New 
England and New York fairs this fall. 
At Syracuse, N. Y., in the butter 
tests. Holsteins won, Jerseys took 
second and Gifford' Devons took third 
rank. 

'96.—H. T. Edwards, Hemp Exper- 
iment U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, who is located at Manila. Phil- 
ippine Islands, spent the summer at 
his home in Chesterfield. He has 
returned to take up his duties on the 
islands. 

'96. —Newton S. Shultis, with Mark 

', Shultis, grain Broker, 601 Chamber 

of Commerce, Boston. A daughter 

was born to Mr. and Mrs. Shultis 

June 1 1 . 

*99. — Lt. William H. Armstrong, 
U. S. A., is stationed at Mayagiiez, 
P. R. 

'00.— A. W. Morrill, Box 657. 
Phoenix, Ariz. 

'02. — C. I. Lewis is the author of 
two bulletins recently published by the 
Oregon Experiment Station, — "Pol- 
lenation of the Apple" and "Culture of 
Small Fruits." 

'03. H.J. Franklin will go to the 
Cape soon to establish a cranberry 
substation for the study of insects and 



fungi attacking the crop, th > erf 

fertilizers, etc. His headquarters will 
be at Wareham. 

'04. H. M. Whi" his resigned 
his position with the Division of Pomo- 
logy, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. 

'05.— Lyman, J. F.. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physiological Chemistry, 
University of Ohio, Columbia, 0. 

'06,— Married. Oct. 6, W. C. 
Tannatt to Miss Alice E. Burt. 



An $8 Ten 
For I Cent 

I will award a lVail and Cold 

Crocket Pen tothe person who 
1 an write legibly the greatest 
number of timet on s postal 
card (using one side only) the 
following phrase ! 

"TUB CROCK B K 
FOUNT A IN PKN." 
••You Blow It To I III It." I or 
sale by I.. B. Mlllett. 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from r A. M. to 4 A. M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



the New England Fruit Show, Boston, 
October 19-24, contributed jointly by 
Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island. 
Massachusetts and Connecticut. In- 
sects will be exhibited in Riker mounts, 
of which there will probably be about 
fifty, taking up the most important 
pests of orchards and small fruits. Of 
these, Massachusetts will furnish about 
a dozen mounts. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT AND ANIMAL 
CHEMISTRY. 

The Station is looking for a man to 
succeed Mr. Goldsmith who soon 
leaves. 

N. H. Kennedy, a graduate of the 
chemistry course, New Hampshire 
College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts, 1909, for the present will be as- 
sistant to Mr. Holland in research 
work in insecticides and methods for 
determination of different ingredients 
in butter fats. He began work Octo- 
ber 15. 

MASSACHUSETTS EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The Station will exhibit at the New 
England Fruit Show, Boston, October 
19-24. 

E. F. Gaskill, '06, supervised the 
picking of the cranberries at the sub- 
station at Waquoit. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

'82. — Herbert Myrick is the treas- 
urer of a corporation organized to build 
! a hotel in Springfield. The building 
and its furnishings will represent an 
investment of about $700,000. 

'90. — C. H. Jones, chemist at the 
Vermont Experiment Station has just 



All ranis must be written 

in ink and must contain the 

name oi the contestant. 

( '..ntest closes Nov. 10, '09. 
Send all (aids to 

E. E. MILLETT, 

Amherst, Mass. 



FATI MA ™ BKISH 

20 for 15 cts. O 





THE college "Fiat." Initia- 
tion. Plenty of bumps. 
Bully fellows. And after the 
skirmish Fatima Cigarettes. 

That pleasant blend of Turkish 
tobacco, always the same, always satis- 
lying. 

The cigarette with the distinctly 
different taste. Mild, smooth and 
mellow. 

THB AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



^k 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 19, 1909. 



I )o you want Security for Horrowing 

Money to continue your College 

( ourse? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
ami Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

lyiASS.WfUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving 0. Davis, . tgmU I .' North 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College Aj . en Bros 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 



The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Statistics of its growth. i»o8 to 1908 

1 Total Receipts: From 189I to I9 o8 there was a steady increase in the total re- 
ceipts of the College. In the first five years of this period, they increased about 
350/,,, and in the latter five years, nearly 45% more, making a total of approximately 
80% in the ten years. 

2 Inventory of Buildings: From 1898 to 1903 the value of the College buildings 
increased about 30%; during the five years which followed, the increase was over 

6o ( /. 

3 " Total Inventory: The increase in total inventory, including land, buildings, and 
equipment, was not especially great, there being an increase of 42% from .898 to 
1903, and an additional increase from 1903 to 1908, of 43%. 

4. Number of Instructors: The teaching force of the College increased 55% in this 

decade, the additions to the faculty coming gradually during the period. 

5 Number of Four-years' Students: The annual increase in number of regular 

. students from .898 to .903 was slightly over 8%; the annual increase for the following 
five years was between 22% and 23%, the total increase being 158%. 

■ 6 Total Enrolment: Under this head the most striking indication of the growth 
of the Institution is noted. In 1903 the total enrolment had increaesd 60% over 
that of five years previous. From 1903 to 1908 there was an increased attenda 
of 355%. making a total increase in all departments of the College 4 >5% ior 
ten year period. 

SUMMARY. 
Approximate Percent of Increase. 



Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



the 



/)<u/y$&. Sumiay $2. Weekly %\ 



Total Receipts 
Inventory of Huildings 
Total Inventory 
Number of Instructors 
Number of Four-years' Students 
Total Enrolment 



1 8987 1 903 

35 
3° 
42 
30 

43 

60 



1003-1908 

45 
60 

43 

25 
"5 
355 



898-1908 
80 
90 
85 
55 
.58 

4i5 



Amherst, Mass. 



'06.— G. Talbot French has secured The College Senate, 



a year's leave of absence from the 
N. Y. Agri. Exp. station and has en- 
tered Cornell for gr?duate work. 

•08.— L. W. Chapman, Box 491, 
Great Falls, Mont., chemist, Boston 
and Montana Consolidated Copper and 
Silver Mining Co. 

'09.— L. S. Corbett, foreman with 
United Fruit Company, La Cella 
Farms, Sixaola River, Bocas del Toro, 
Panama. 

'09. — Crossman, S. S., U. S. 
Bureau of Entomology White Fly In- 
vestigation, P. 0. Box 589, Orlando, 
Florida. 

'09. — Curran, D. A., Room 8, 
Badauacco Building, North Attleboro, 
Mass. With the North Attleboro 
Sewerage Committee. 

•09. — Potter. R. C, Instructor, 
Pinkerton Academy, Derry Village, 
N. H. 



Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 
R. H. Allen, Manager 
G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 
R. S. Eddy, Manager 
L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 
H. W. Blaney, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 
R. H. Allen, President 
L. S. Dickinson, Mat.ager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 
H. W. French, President. 



R C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTBM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. & Roberts. 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



for 



JACKSON Or CUTLER 



ATHLETIC FIELD PLANS 

[Continued 'rom first page] 



year. To carry out this very wise 
scheme, every college needs abundant 
land. In some respects, this idea of 
a recreation ground is of even more 
importance than that of an enclosed 
athletic field for intercollegiate games; 
and it is much to be regretted that the 
legislature did not see fit to give us a 
chance, which 1 am afraid will not 
come again, to get this land all 
together, and to make out of it a 
model recreation field for our students. 
However, it is gratifying to know that 
after nearly fifteen years of effort on 
behalf of an adequate enclosed athletic 
field, we are at least "within reach of 

the pole." 

Kenyon L. Butterfield. 



THE H. L. FROST & 
BARTLETT CO., 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



AND 
Entomologists, 

stamford, conn. 



CARS 



Leave AUGIK COLLEGE lor HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special C*r» at Reasonable Rate* 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday October 26, 1909. 




No. 6 



IwiLLIAMS VICTORY j PRESIDENTS MEET 



EMBASSY HERE 



Wet Field Gives Williams a Score of 

33 to 6. Team Shows Up Well 

in Spite of Odds. 

Our football team meet defeat at 
the hands of Williams last Saturday at 
Williamstown by a score that gives our 
opponents more credit than is her due. 
We were beaten by a team that aver- 
aged 20 pounds heavier than ours, and 
on a wet and slippery field, weight is 
everything in a game of old-fashioned 
football. The home team had the 
advantage that all home teams have ; 
a full quota of second string men to 
replace fatigued or injured players. 
Roberts was missed greatly on defense, 
and Walker was also out with injuries. 
There were several redeeming feat- 
ures in our play. For the first time 
this year, our offense worked well, much 
better than the defense. Moreau proved 
himself a classy line plunger, but was 
weak at stopping plays. Hosmer was 
in his last year's form at carrying the 
ball, but missed many tackles, a rare 
thing for him. Blaney made some 
good gains, and stopped his man 
regularly. Morse was the star in the 
backfield, using excellent judgement in 
the selection of his plays, tackling 
unerringly, and helping the other backs 
through the line. His two open field 
tackles prevented two sure touchdowns 
and he added a point to our score by 



Agricultural College Presidents of New Commercial Embassy of Japan Inspect 



England Meet at 
M. A. C. 

Two years ago the Presidents of 
the Land Grant colleges in New Eng- 



College. Battalion Reviewed 
in Their Honor. 

To-day, a delegation from the Hon- 
orary Commercial Commissioners of 



land met informally to discuss prob- ! Japan, who are making an extended 
lem connected with the administration 1 tour of the United States, visited the 
of their institutions. Last year they | Massachusetts Agricultural 



met again, and on Friday evening. 
Presidents Howard Edwards of Rhode 
Island, W. D. Gibbs of New Hamp- 
shire and C. E. Berch of Connecticut 
gathered with President Butterfield 
and the administrative officers of this 
college for an informal business meet- 
ing and supper at Draper Hall. Presi- 
dent Buckham of Vermont and Presi- 
dent Fellows of Maine were unable to 
attend. The meeting this year was 
more in the nature of a social gather- 
ing, but at the same time it afforded 
a convenient opportunity to become 
familiar with each other's work and 

ideas. 

Saturday morning was spent in an 
inspection of the college by the guests 
and faculty. Special attention was 
paid to the barns, orchards and green- 
houses. At eleven o'clock the 
officers of the college and Experiment Nursery. 



They came from Boston, reaching 
Amherst at 1 1-42. They made a brief 
inspection of the principal buildings at 
the college, and at 1-30 were Enter- 
tained at luncheon in Draper Hall, as 
guests of the college. 

At 2-40, the students and officers of 
the institution assembled in the Chapel, 
and members of the delegation spoke. 
After the Assembly, an Informal re- 
ception was given in honor of the dele- 
gation. 

At 4 o'clock, the guests reviewed 
the military battalion drill. 

The gentlemen who came are the 
following: — 

Professor Dr. Takajiro Minami, of 
the College of Agriculture of the Im- 
perial University of the Northwest. 
Mr. Torajiro Watase, Alderman of 
Tokyo, and proprietor of the Kono-yen 
Mr. Motosada 7umoto. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Oct. 26— Stockbridge Club, 7-00 p. m. 
H. D. Smith, President 
Mass. State Poultry Asso- 
ciation. "How South 
Shore Soft Roasters are 
Raised." 

Oct. 27— Assembly : Address by Hon. 
Robert Luce, Boston. 
Debating Club in Agricul- 
tural Room, 6-45 P. M. 

Oct. 28— Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m. in 
chapel. Leader, Justus 
C. Bailey '10. 

Oct. 30— Mettawampe Trek. Take 
1-07 p. m. car, Amherst 
House to Cowles' Corner ; 
thence to Pulpit. Eastman 
and Flat Hills and Pratt's 
Corner. 

Oct. 31—9-15 a. m. Sunday morn- 
ing service in chapel. 
Ray Stannard Baker. 



Proprietor of the Japan Times, Tokyo, 
and Director of the Oriental Informa- 
tion Agency at New York. 

All these men were students of Pro- 



Station held an informal reception in 
the Social Union Room and later the 
whole party adjourned to President 
Butterfleld's for lunch. In their dis- 

Sch^erhorn and Ha^n p,a y ed b es,, | £?%£ ^ftw Z* *» a, Sapporo, Japan. 

important every year, for it is seldom 
that such a notable gathering of agri- 
cultural experts meets for a similar 
purpose. 



opening up many holes for Moreau 
Schermerhorn's kicking-off was a valu- 
able asset, his drives reaching or pass- 
ing the posts every time. His punt- 
ing, which not up to his and Robert's 
high standard, owing to the sticky 
mud, excelled that of Williams. 
O'Brien played a flashy game in the 
second half. Hubbard was the stellar 
performer among the forwards. Few 
plays passed him, and the opposing 



President Clark spent a year in 
Japan, and really established the ag- 
ricultural college on a permanent basis. 
At least seven alumni of the college 



The Mettawampe trek. Saturday, 
ought to be especially attractive to the 
students. The views from the three 
high points, Pulpit. Eastman, and Flat 
Hills is unsurpassed at this time of 
year, overlooking, as they do, the 
valley, the bcrkkoiures, Bush Moun- 
tain and the Pelham Hills. At Pratt's 
Corner supper will be cooked around 
the camp fires. Each one Is asked to 
bring a tin cup. his lunch and some- 
thing to cook. Return to college will 
be made by moonlight through Hawley 
Swamp and past Wildwood Cemetery. 

THE HAZING QUESTION. 

There has been a number of articles 



C 
It 



Bulletin 
is a very 



BULLETIN 

The September M. A 
was issued last Saturday, 
attractive little book, describing the 
college. The book is nicely illustrated 
him, and the opposing j ^ photographs of the college buildings t0 Amherst 
quarters soon learned it, and the Wil ^ q{ ^ d , fferent aspects of tne life. 

The whole thing is done in different 
tones of brown with the exception of a 
gray photograph of the chapel on its 
cover. It certainly ought to prove a 
drawing card when sent to prospec- 
tive students. 



were connected with the institution, L, tne dai | y papers recently concerning 
for ten years the president of the col- J hazing, and the authors of these arti- 

1 «_ _ J m f. AHA I ..1 _- - -*«^— fnl/on 



lege was a man who had gone out from 

M. A. C. 

Professor Brooks met the party 
in Boston and accompanied them 



liams bleachers often recognized It. 
Fumbles were very infrequent, the 
ball changing hands only once by that 
means. In the first half only two 
punts were made on each side, and la 
the second only on that by Williams. 
Three forward passes were tried, one 
making 5 yards, and Williams losing 
12. One short kick was executed, 
netting 18 yards to Williams. We 
escaped without a penalty, while our 
opponents had three for offside and 



cles have, without exception, taken 
the stand that hazing ought to be abol- 
ished. With this question as with all 
other questions of the day, there are 
two sides. Those who maintain that 
hazing is a useful, honorable, and even 
a necessary part of the instruction in 



APPLE JUDGING CONTEST 

At the New England Fruit Show ! those colleges desiring to graduate men 
held last week in Boston, three col- with abroad, liberal education are 
leges competed in judging and pack- amused to see that those of the opt- 
ing contests, Maine, New Hampshire posite views are content w,th decrying 
and MAC. competing. The the practice without offering the least 
team representing Massachusetts were suggestion of a substitute to take its 
S C Brooks. W. R. Clarke, and A. place. Their attitude towards 



subject is on a par with the relations 
of the republican and democratic parties 
at the present time. Where the for- 



Y. nl . C A. 

The Y. M. C. A. is considering the 

giving of a lecture or an illustrated ; W. Holland In the packing contest 

course of lectures this winter, on the , the result was Massachusetts first, 

op^c,,. . management of playgrounds and on the New "^"^L™^ mer stands for a certain definite and 

one for an incomplete forward pass, history of the playground movement ^ J^ ^ great political 

The two helves were very similar.: ^ playground management offers New Hampshire a , is sues, the latter pursues a purely nega- 

1„ each. William, scored three times, vaca tion work to many college men chusetts ^ J^^ ™ tive policy , that is, the criticism of the 
then our men braced, once scoring, a nd since the movement is spreading score was made by W. R Carton t. p y, ^ ^ 

Ind once reachingthe 2-yard line. In ra pidly throughout the country, this Silver ^ ^\^^^^T^l thinking persons and are 
the second half the plays were nearer I course of lectures should prove very teams and for the highest individual ^jpj^ ^^ _^ ^^ 



[Continued on p«cs 4.1 



popular. 



score. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 26, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 26, 1909. 









THE COL L E GE_SI_G NAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910, Editor-in-Chief. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE, 1911, Asst. Editor. 

HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. College Notes. 

LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM, 1910, Alumni Notes. 

EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911, Department Notes. 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, Colleg* Notes. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. M. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30 t 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9-15 to 10 a. m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. M. 
Thursday 11-15 to 12 *». 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912, Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY, OCT. 26. No. 6 



The Junior class, so far, has proven 
a negative quantity in the Signal 
Board competition. There is to be 
one member selected from that class 
and if there are no men doing work, 
how is it possible to do so. Lend a 
hand, 1911. 



Josiah C. Folsom '10 will be News 
Editor for the next issue, Nov. 2. 
The editorial staff have planned th3 
following special numbers for the Sig- 
nal: Nov. 9, Springfield number; 
Nov. 16, Alumni number; Nov. 23, 
Football number. The Alumni num- 
ber is to be edited by the Alumni 
Association. 



The college man who parades his 
troubles receives scant sympathy. 
The man who breaks his word is 
branded with shame. The man who 
betrays a "yellow streak" finds a 
mark set upon him. This is as it 
should be. College has no tolerance 
for a whiner, a cheat or what is known 
as a "quitter." College life demands 
men who are morally and physically 
manly and without such men Its spirit 
dies. Who is a "quitter?" A 
"quitter" is one who lacks physical 
and mental energy or moral stamina. 
If he is woefully lacking, his shortcom- 
ings are soon brought to light and he 
receives from his fellows the censure 
which he merits. If he is but slightly 
lacking, no one finds him out but him- 
self and the only censure he receives 
is self-imposed. Conversely, who is 
not a "quitter?" He's the man who 
is not afraid of a physical jolt, a bruise 
or an ache. He's the man who does 
not fear to stand for what he thinks is 
right. 

If, just now, you are a "quitter" in 
a small way, whom no one has found 
out, turn over a new leaf. Get up on 
your toes, take a grip on life and 
begin to move things your way. Con- 
quer your tendency to inertia. Dust 
the cobwebs of inactivity from your 
brain and tackle your studies with the 
vim the football men tackle the 
"dummy." Don't think lightly of a 
lie even if such is the attitude of every 
man you know. Be a whole man and 
infuse every day of your life with a 
purpose. Give to the college the best 
you have and this will be your reward: 
the best will come back to you. 



WE'LL 




WE DO 



SHOE HEPHIRING 



IN THE 

POSSIBLE 
MANNER 

Our Repairing Department is well 
equipped with everything that's mod- 
ern in the way of Shoe Repairing 
Machinery. 

EXPERT WORKMEN DO THE WORK 
OUR PRICES ARE MODERATE 
Uring your Shoes here for repairs and see how promptly, how well, 
and reasonably " We'll Mend 'Km." This Shoe Store is always at the front 
with the best of Shoe Service in every line. 



JiVME>» H*. PAGE, 

Next to Post Office 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT & SHOE 
REPAIRING 

[at 
LOWEST PRICES 



Open from 7 
of 



a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 



33 to 6, but score does not always 
tell the tale. The team certainly 
played a good game against Williams 
and we are satisfied. The field was 
wet and slippery and Williams with her 
heavy team could hardly help but run 
up a big score. It was only good luck, 
for her, that we didn't do more scoring 
as we were held twice on their one 
yard line. Williams seems to have 
been our "hoodoo" for the last two 
years. She has caught us at the 
wrong time in the season. Still we 
hav'nt lost hope that we are going 
"to do things" to Williams yet. 



R. I_E 



1 1 



VINE 

1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Roberts was unable to make the 
Williams trip on account of a badly 
wrenched knee. 

Lowry '12 has been able to come 
back to college after his illness caused 
by severe exhaustion in the Tug-o-war. 
The campus trenches are being filled 
up slowly and last week, heat was con- 
nected again with the buildings on the 
hill. 

Sheehan ex-' 12, who left college 
the middle of last year on account of 
sickness, has returned to college with 
1913. 

Several Dartmouth men were about 
college last Saturday and Sunday, 
having come down to the Amherst- 
The editorial, taken from the Tufts' Dartmouth game. 
Weekly in regard to hazing is the pre- The 191 1 Index was entirely sent to 
vailing sentiment throughout our col- the printer yesterday. The Board 
leges and we feel that it also applies nave s P ent much time u P on tne book 
to this college. It's a big question, since returning to college this fall and 
certainly, and there are two sides ^according t0 them » jt is t0 be the best 
it. In mingling with the life here, the ever - 

sentiment of the article clearly \ It is being published by the Andover 
expresses that of our thinking men. Press of Andover, Mass,, and the en- 
It seems that we are merely putting off gravings are being furnished by the 
the time when we, as a student body, Mass. Engraving Co. of Boston, 
must take a stand. If hazing is abol- There is no doubt of the book being 
ished what will take its place? Are out by the first of December and it 
we not men enough to meet the situa- will make the very best Xmas present 
tion squarely? from M. A. C. 





V .V --^^ 




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AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



There are seven good reasons 



why YOU should buy 



COAL 



OK 



C. R. ELDER 



FELLOWS! 

FOR YOUR 
SUPPLIES, CANDY, 
TONIC, etc. 

VISIT THE 

Aggie 
Store 

Basement of North College 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

Kor over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Pernvlan Guano Base 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(Basic Slag Phosphate.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric 
Acid and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA, %% Pure 

POTASH SALTS. 

Fertilizer Literature la sent Tree of Charge If 
you mention the college Signal. 



THE COE- 




PHI KAPPA PHI ORATION. 

"Young men, you have your part in 
this great democracy. Attend the 
caucus, cast the ballot, your most 
precious birthright, and fight the spoils- 
men not only in your opponents party 
but in your own." This was the ap- 
peal of Hon. Frank A. Hosmer last 
Wednesday afternoon as he presented 
to the members of the Phi Kappa Phi 
and the student body, his plea for good. 
American citizenship. 

It was the annual meeting of the 
fraternity with the students and prior to 
the oration, President J. B. Lindsey. 
who presided, explained to the men the 
meaning and purpose of the organiza- 
tion. He then Introduced the speaker 
of the day who was received with great 
applause. 

Mr. Hosmer's oration was upon 
"Anglo-Saxon Freedom and Ameri- 
can Citizenship." The first part of 
his address dealt mainly with the his- 
tory of the English People from the 
time that our ancestors first conceived 
ideas of self-government until the War 
of the American Revolution. He 
brought out very clearly the love of 
freedom which the people possessed 
as shown at the time by Magna Charta, 
Wat Tyler's Rebellion, and the Bill of 
Rights. 

Mr. Hosmer then said in part, 
"The mingling of nationalities in the 
United States is creating a new race 
but the same old English principals 
are predominant. Danger from foreign 
foes is possible but remote. Our real 
enemies are of our own household ; 
idleness, intemperence, impurity, and 
extravagance. Vast business interests 
tend to eliminate the personal factor. 
The employer is being lost In the cor- 
poration, the employee in the union, 
which facts are bringing about a lack of 
individual responsibility. These things 
are all foes to good government. Again , 
there is the Indifference of the average 
voter. This is perhaps the greatest 
evil in our own cities to-day and muni- 
cipal misgovernment is the penalty. 
However, Christian principles have firm 
root in our civilization. Asylums, 
hospitals, provision for the sick of every 
disease, for the widow and orphan, for 
the aged and infirm, are all products 
of our civilization. Penitentaries, 
houses of correction. and reform 
schools indicate by their names the 
idea of saving even the criminal class." 
The closing words were, "If vices 
are to be checked, if virtues are to be 
developed, the plain duty of citizenship 
must be performed. Questions of 
momentous import are to be settled by 
the common people, actuated by the 
essentials of Christianity. Govern- 
ment of, and for, and by the people is 
secure as long a our churches, our 
schools and our colleges are true to the 
Golden Rule." 

The student body then rose and gave 
a rousing long yell for Mr. Hosmer. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the If. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST UUTFITTING 

jC ^lyh the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



The mixing of fertilizers takes into account 
geology, which tells of the formation and composition 
of soils; chemistry, which shows the needs of crops 
and how they ran be supplied ; botany, which tells of 
the structure of crops and their habits of growth 
bacteriology, which treats of soil bacteria or soil-yeast, 
without which crops are bound to fail. Do not the 
lessons of the class room result in formulae parallel 
in a large degree, to the Srockbridge Special Fertih- 
zers ? 

Study the plant food problem. 



B0WKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylun\ at\d H»9h Streets, 



Hartford, Coi\n. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

_ • ,,„ Wai.tkk S. Garde. 

Banquets a specialty. 



24-26 Stone Street, NEW YORK. 



'09. — H. J. 
W. P. I. game. 



Neale attended the 

/ 



C*rp*rvter & Morehous*, 
PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 26, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tnesday, October, 26, 1909. 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 

Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $12.50 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - $11.50 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. ... $10.00 

Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. ... $9.00 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. ... $9.00 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 
Rain Cloth, - $3-5° per yd. Trouserings, - $3-5° per yard. 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A WILLIAMS VICTORY 

[Continued from first page.] 



A. 



IN 



P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

03^ Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



witb a full line of College Supplies 



may be found at 



EWELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOVVKR EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



nOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins 5octs. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

I [.00 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3ct. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 " Broken Hank and Confederate 

Bills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mail Auction Circulars anil 
Selling price list. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

NiiniiKmntist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON. 



M. D. G'LMAN. C. A. MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 
IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



the middle of the line of scrimmage, 
with little end running. Many fancy 
formations were tried by Williams, 
some of them working well. 

Williams opened by kicking to 
Leonard, who was stopped on the 28- 
yard. After two ineffectual plunges, 
we punter 1 , but a minute later recov- 
ered a fumble, and again kicked, 
Hubbard tackling on Williams' 30 
mark. Two long gains, one for 34- 
yards being stopped by Morse in an 
open fielder, put the ball on our 28- 
yard line. Four rushes put it over. 
No goal was kicked. Score, 5-0. 

Williams ran our kick-off 32 yards 
to the 47-yard mark, and scored in 8 
rushes. Peterson kicked goal. 
Score, 1 1-0. 

Schermerhorn's next kickoff re- 
sumed by scrimmage on Williams 25- 
yard line. A trick netted a 7-yard 
loss, and a kick followed, Morse com- 
ing back 5 yards with the ball. 
Hosmer tore off 8 through right tackle. 
An offside penalty gave us first down 
on 37 mark. Blaney made 4, Hub- 
bard 5 on a forward pass, and another 
penalty gave us first down. Morse 
recovered a fumble for 15 yards loss. 
We were too near the Purple goal for 
a punt, so Morse tried an almost 
impossible drop, Lewis placing the ball 
on his 20 mark. From this point, by 
the aid of a 40-yard run around their 
right end which Morse again stopped, 
Williams scored in 8 attempts. No 
goal kicked. Score, 16-0. 

Schermerhorn kicked to Kellogg on 
the goal line, the fullback carrying the 
ball 27 yards before being downed. A 
minute later the penalty for an incom- 
plete forward pass put Williams so 
much to the bad that they punted to 
Morse in the middle of the field. 
Nine line plunges put the ball on our 
opponents 7-yard line, third down, 
5 1-2 to go. Moreau made a fine line 
buck, but failed one quarter of a yard 
short of tbe required distance. Wil- 
liams carried the ball back to the 28 
mark, and time was up. 

Second half: After a 23-yard run- 
back from the kickoff, Williams made 
gains of 13 and 18 yards, then Hub- 
bard stopped them twice with no gains 
drawing applauses from the opposing 
stands, but 7 line plunges put Prindle 
over with 5 more points. No goal 
kicked; score, 21-0. 

Beginning at the 23-yard line, Wil- 
liams scored in 14 rushes, including a 
forward pass. Goal kicked by Van 
Gorder. Score, 27-0. 

Our kickoff again went over the line, 
and Williams went 85 yards in 15 
downs, aided by a short kick that was 
good for 18 yards. The goal was 
kicked by Stocking. Score, 33-0. 
Immediately after the next kickoff 
Williams was forced to kick to her 
own 46 mark. Hosmer made 2, then 
Moreau again showed class by bucking 
the middle of the line for 9, 8 and 7 
yards, then Blaney made 6. Moreau 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 

S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Hlock 
Amherst, Mass. 



.*E. N. PARISEAU,.* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 

Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



H. WARREN 
& SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 




THOMPSON 

SPORTING GOODS 

STORE 
and REPAIR SHOP. 

Rear First Nat. Hank. 



TYPEWRITERS 



For Sale or Rent. 



carried the ball over the last line in 3 
more crashes. Morse kicked a very 
muddy goal. Score, 33 6. 

In the remaining two minutes Blaney 
took the kickoff and ran it back 18 
yards. Seven rushes by our backfield 
put us in the center of the field when 
the half ended. 



I e. 



l.t. 



WILLIAMS. 

Smith 
Rice. ( 

J. Brooks. 
Tillinghast 

Graves. \ , 
W. Mason, J ' K 

Anderson, c. 

r agC ' |r.g. 
Graves, I " 

B. Brooks, r.t. 

Pra't, J 
Olcutt, S 

Lewis, 1 . 

Van Gorder, I q ' 

Linder. ( , . . 
Prindle. \ lhh ' 

Rogers, 

Stocking 



m. a. c. 
r.e., Hubbard 

r.t., Schermerhorn 

I Hay den 
rg " } Baker 
McGarr 
ayden 



T. I*. PAIG1 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



l M 
-f H 



r.e 



[rh.b. 
Kellogg, f b. 



l.g., Powers 
l.t.. Leonard 
l.e , O'Brien 

q.b.. Morse 

r.h.b., Blaney 

l.h.b , Hosmer 
f.b., Moreau 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 
Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Score— Williams. 33; M. A. C 6. 
Touchdowns — B. Brooks Pratt 2, Stocking 
2, Prindle, Moreau. Goals from touch 
downs — Peterson, VanGorder, Stocking, 
Morse. Umpire — Andrews of Yale. Ref- 
eree— Dadman of Worcester P. 1. Field 
judge--De Camp of Williams. Time — 25m. 
halves. 



TENNIS GOODS 

FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 

GUNS and AMMUNITION 

HOCKEY SKATES and 

STICKS 

SNOW SHOES and 
SKIS. 

E. A. Thompson 



APPLE EXHIBITION 

The apple exhibition which was held 
in Horticultural Hall on Massachu- 
setts avenue in Boston is not only the 
greatest display of tne kind ever held in 
New England, but there is said to have 
been nothing so large ever brought to- 
gether east of the Mississippi river. 
The object of the exhibition is to show 
the farmers of New England that it 
lies within their power to raise jus.t as 
fine apples as are grown in any of the 
mucn advertised sections of Colorado, 
Idaho, Oregon or Washington, and 
to do this at a large profit. Indeed 
the New England product is of finer 
flavor than the apples of the West, 
which run to size at the expense of 
quality. In this connection Mr. Ells- 
worth, secretary of the State Board of 
Agriculture, who has recently visited 
the Hood river valley in Oregon where 
apples that command the highest 
prices are raised, says that the soil and 
climate there are no better than New 
England affords. Secretary Elisworth ! 
declares it to be folly for men to go to 
that country and pay from $250 to: 
$500 an acre for land or from $1000 
to $3000 an acre for planted orchards, 
where irrigation is needed, and where 
in many respects the life is by no 
means as pleasant as here, while in 
New England, land equally good could 
could be got for less than $50 an acre, 
in sections not needing irrigation, in 
touch with the old civilization of the 
East, and with many other advantages, 
not the least of which is a market at 
at hand for all the fruit that can be 
raised without paying for a long freight 
haul across the continent. — Springfield 
Republican. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Preiser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats t<> order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Rent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Early and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $ 1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY RROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 


ifj,' 






1 

Fraternity 


and 


4X n? 






and 


Invitations 


^52? 






Class Inserts 


Menus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 


(H° 






for Annuals 
Fraternity 
and Class 


Covers 

Wedding Invi 




v/ 




Cards 


Stationery 


tations and 


Calling 





WOR KS, 17th STREET <& LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 26, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 26, 1909. 






GOODS FOR MEN. 




C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



.£) English 



and Scotch Woolens. 



THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



ALUMNI AT BOSTON BANQUET 

Last Thurslay night the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce entertained 
the fruit growers of New England at a 
dinner in Ford Hall. 

The Agricultural Committee, three 
of whose nine members are M. A. C. 
men — Geo. H. Ellis, the chairman, 
W. K. Bowker, 71, and President 
Butterfield — wished to call attention 
to the importance of agriculture and 
especially fruit growing in New Eng- 
land. Accordingly they planned this 
banquet. About five hundred were 
present, three hundred members of 
the Chamber and the most prominent 
business and commercial men of Bos- 
ton, and two hundred guests, the 
majority of whom were fruit growers 
or faculty members of New England 
agricultural colleges. 

The program of speakers alonj? 
agricultural lines, included such well- 
known men as Dr. G. M. Twitchel of 
Maine, Pres. Butterfield, J. H. Hale 
of Connecticut, Prof. John Craig of 
Cornell, and Sec'y Ellsworth of the 
Massachusetts State Board of Agricul- 
ture. Many subjects were discussed 
and the dinner was a complete success. 
The meeting is considered especially 
important because of the recognition 
of the importance of agricultural inter- 
ests in New England, by the business 
men of Boston. 



ing the children clean healthy amuse- 
ments, we begin at the root of the evils. 
But in helping boys to gain better 
work, in helping them choose a voca- 
tion for which they are fitted, the set- 
tlements do their greatest work. The 
wealth of this country consists not in 
its mines, its factories or its farms, 
but in realizing on the productive 
capacity of the coming generation. 
By picking out the more capable boys 
who are fitted for better than the ordi- 
nary "job" the settlement work is 
helping the community realize on its 
productive capacity and here is proving 
itself worth while. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Block, Amhkkst, M fcSS, 



^N . DAVIS. Cut flowers always on hand 



Fine Rtpmiring m S&cialty 

Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



STEAM FITTING, 
GAS FITTING, TINNING. 



Phoenix Row 



Telephone 59—4. 



Telephone or call. 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DBNTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amhkkst, Mass. 



On UK Hours: 
f)toiuA.M.i.a(>toni' 



.•VI. 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



Ether and Nitrous 
stered when desired 



Oxide Gai admin- 



A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 

Memorial Windows, 

Lead Liohts, &c. 
6Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



Insurance on Students' 
Furniture, Etc, $i.oo per 
$roo. for 3 years while in any 
College or private building. 



W. R. BROWN 



ROBERT D. WOODS OF BOSTON 
"ON SOCIAL SETTLEMENT." 

"It is a curious thing how liberty, 
equality and fraternity, the watchwords 
of democracy have come to be twisted 
and misunderstood in the last 150 
years," said Mr. Woods on Sunday 
morning. "We have almost forgotten 
fraternity. But you have got to have 
fraten.ity or democracy is a failure. 

About 25 years ago we began to 
realize that if you would keep a people 
from moral, political and industrial de- 
cay, you must keep them together. 
Though there were not the same 
forces at work here as in Europe, yet 
some with even stronger influence 
were tending to separate people into 
classes. This holding of people to- 
gether is a science, the greatest and 
most difficult of the present day, and 
it is the man who is master of this 
science that possesses power. This is 
the work mapped out for the social 
settlements, to bring and hold the peo- 
ple of our great cities together. We 
endeavor to transplant a group of 
healthy energetic citizens into an 
' apathetic and shiftless district, so that 
without assuming too much leadership, 
they gradually lead the people of that 
Pllimber, Steam & GaS Fitter, section into a freer and more vigorous 

Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. existe j nce - 

u And to do this we get at the children 

first. If you can get the confidence 
of the children it does not take much 
to bring you close to the parents. 



THE FRESHMAN TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT 

By consistent brilliancy and excel- 
lent all-round playing, H. T. Roehrs 
last Wednesday morning won the 
chamLionship of the Freshman Fall 
Tennis Tournament, by defeating F. 
L. Ames in the tournament finals. 
The victory was not misplaced, as 
Roehrs played throughout the tourna- 
ment in excellent form, not losing a 
single set to his opponents. 

Those entered in the tournament 
were H. Goodnough, A. Edminster, 
N.J. Nichols, H. Corey, W. Cleve- 
land, H. E. Jenks, J. Bradley, H. T. 
Roehrs, C. A. Shute, S. M. Jordan, 
J. S. Carver, F. L. Ames, F. D. 
Griggs, C. L. Thayer, L. N. Pease, 
H. L. Wheeler, R. S. Fay and R. J. 
Borden. Fay, Wheeler, Griggs, 
Ames, Nichols, Jordan, Roehrs, and 
Jenks qualified for the second round. 
The winners in this round were Fay 
6-2.6.0; Ames 9 7, 3-6,6.4; Nich- 
ols 6- 1,6-1; Roehrs 7-5, 7.5. Ames 
beat Fay in the semi-finals 4-6, 6-3, 
6-2 wh le Roehrs downed Nichols 
6-4, 6-0. In the finals Roehrs won 
over Ames 6 3, 6-1, 8-6. 

Those who showed up especially well 
in the matches were Roehrs, Ames, 
Nichols, Fay, Jenks, Griggs. 



J. H. TROTT 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 

Telephone 36-12. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

BOTANY. 

Seminars in botany are to be held 
every two weeks on Tuesday at Clark 
Hall. 

PLANT AND VEGETABLE PATHOLOCY. 

The Station had an exhibit of apples 
at the New England Fruit Show, Bos- 
ton, last week, illustrative of results of 
orchard experiments. Much interest 
was shown in this. 

AGRICULTURE. 

The judges of the Stock Judging 
contest misunderstood their instruc- 
tions, causing a delay in correcting the 
papers. The results will be announced 
as toon as the papers have been 
finished. 

library gifts. 

Prof. George L. Raymond of Prince- 
ton University has recently given to 
Then you influence a district and the library ten volumes of his writings 
finally the whole city may be swayed j concerning Art, Aesthetics, Poetry 
for good, clean government. By giv- j and Psychology. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. 'Trie new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chysanthemuins 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



John C. Hockenberry of Westfield 
also gave a very desirable book to the 
library entitled "The Rural Schools of 
the United States." 

H. E. Stockbridge '92, who is the 
agricultural editor of the Southern' 
Ruralist, published in Atlanta, Ga., has \ 
recently placed the name of the library 
on its mailing list with "the hope that 
students may occasionally be inter- 
ested in material to be found in the 
largest and most representative South- 
ern agricultural periodical which leads 
all other American semi-monthly agri- 
cultural journals in point of circu- 
lation." 

M. T. Smulyan '09 recently gave 
to the library a splendid collection of 
back numbers of the Index. 

The library has also received from 
Prof. S. F. Howard '94 the Outlook 
for the years 1902-6. 

GENERAL AND AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

The need of larger and better facili- 
ties for teaching chemistry is now 
more clearly apparent than ever before. 

The number of students in the 
various courses are as follows: — Gen- 
eral Inorganic 230, Advanced Quail 
tative Analysis 16, Quantitative Analy- 
sis 3, Physical chemistry 4, Organic 
chemistry 8, Graduate Work 4. 

The large number of men in Gen- 
eral chemistry are divided into six 
sections because of lack of lecture 
room and laboratory space. 



LUNCHES 



of the latest events among your old 
college friends. Blow your own horn 
a little, too. It will generally be news 
to us and Is sure to be news to some 
alumnus when he gets his next paper. 
Among recent visitors to the college 
have been J. W. Kellogg "00, H. J. 
Franklin '03, E, A. Back '04, F. A. 
Cutter and Clinton King '07, M. F. 
Geer, W. E. Geer, H. J. Neale, C. 
R. Webb, '09. 

'81.- Doctor and Mrs. Austin 
Peters returned last week from a tour 
of rhe continental cities of Europe. 
While abroad, Dr. Peters attended 
the Hague tuberculosis conference. 

•92,— G. E. Taylor, Jr., has just 
returned from Minnesota where he has 
been purchasing thoroughbred Short- 
horns for his herd at Shelburne. 

'95. — J. A. Billings has recovered 
sufficiently from a recent attack of 
typhoid fever to return to Washington. 
He has purchased a home in the 
suburbs. Address, Silver Springs, 
Md., R. F. D. 3. 

'97. — Und- r the system of exchange 
of teachers between the United States 
and Prussia. C. A. Peters has been 
assigned to the Frederichs Werder. 
Oberrealschule in Berlin and began 
work Oct. 8th. 

Ex-'97. F. W. Barclay, 206 
Pierce St., Kingston, Wilkes Barre, 
Pa., Supetintendant of Parks. A 
recent number cf the Board of Trade 



Journal of Wilkes Barre contains an 
article on the origin and history of the 
cities parks. It was written in pirt by 
Mr. Barclay, It outlines the develop- 
ment of the 160 acres of park system, 
including the preservation for the peo- 
ple, especially the children, of the 
frontage along the beautiful Susque- 
hanna river. 

Ex-97.— A. M. Nowell, afterspend- 
ing a dozen successful years in Hawaii, 
as a planter, has returned to his old 
home In Winchester. 



An $8 Pen 
For 1 Cent 

1 will award •> Pearl and ('.old 
( Irockei Pen to the pence who 
< an write legibly the greatest 

number of times on a postal 
( atd (using one side only) the 
following phrase : 

»T H I: CROCK B K 
IOINTAIN PB N." 
"You Blow ItTo Pill It." For 
sale by li. I.. Mlllett. 

All cards must be written 

in ink ami must contain the 
name of the contestant 

Contest closes Nov. 10, '09. 
Send all cards to 

E. E. MILLETT, 

Amherst, Mass. 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Some of the alumni are wondering 
why there is not more to the Alumni 
column. It may be of interest to the 
readers of the Alumni notes to know 
that most of these items come from 
certain alumni on the college grounds, 
— about six in number. Only rarely 
do they come from other sources. 

Of the notes in the first Signal this 
fall, seven items were received from 
alumni writing to the Signal during 
the summer and early fall. A large 
part of the remainder were culled from 
the returns of blanks to the President's 
office. On Sept. 28, three notes 
came from outside alumni ; on Oct. 
5, none ; on Oct. 12, one ; in the last 
issue, five. Most notes from outside 
come from 'men blowing their own 
horns.' All others were received 
from alumni on the college grounds. 
The wonder is that these men know as 
much as they do of the doings of other 
M. A. C. men. 

And yet alumni are writing, com- 
plaining that the alumni column has 
very little in it this fall. 

Last spring the alumni editor sent 
circular letters to the secretary or a 
member of each class asking for help 
in gathering alumni news. Not ten 
replies have been received. 

Alumni, it's very largely up to you 
to furnish these notes, to make the 
Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry alumni co i um n of value to yourselves. 

You are men who are up and doing. 
Take a minute once in a while to 
write the Signal, telling all you know 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 




Cleaning and Pressing. 



AFTER the rush. Coat inside out, 
L sans collar, tie, etc. Ha;,py at least 
in the possession of a good smoke — 
Fatima Cigarette. 

Their mild, mellow fragrance will always cheer. The 
pleasing taste that comes from the blended Turkish tobacco 

will satisfy. 

And the economy in {tacking gives you ten extra cigarettes. 
THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, October 26, 1909- 



Do you want Security for borrowing 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form oj Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

mass.IUtual life 
insurance co. 

/rri/t'J (I. Davis, .I'jrnf I .' North 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Growth in attendance 1904— 1909 
For the past five years the growth in attendance has been 
a steady one. The following statistics represent this growth 
both in N timbers and Percentage: 



SPRINGFIELD , , 

DI r =. , D . .^ * xt Enrollment of Students I Increase over previous year 

RE PUBLIC AN of College grade i In Numbers In percent 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 1906-07 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



1904-05 


198 


1905-06 


*U 


1906-07 


228 


[907-08 


252 


1 908-09 


289 


1909-10 


350 



y 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly %\. 



16 

14 
24 

37 
61 

Total 152 




A 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



Ex-'97.— J. R. Eddy, Lance Deer, 
Mont., Indian agent, Eddy is the | 
proud father of a ten pound boy said to 
reproduce all the desirable character- 
istics which made his parent famous I 
during his two and one-half years stay . 
at If. A. C. 

'04. — E. A. Back, spent his j 
recent vacation at his home in Flor- ! 
ence. He visited the college during 
that time. 

'05. — P. F. Williams, acting pro- 
fessor of horticulture at the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute recently attended 
the meeting of the National Nut-Grow- 
ers' association at Albany, Ga. He 
was appointed a member of the com- 
mittee on Nomenclature and Standards. 

'06.— E. P. Mudge recently visited 
the college staying for a few days with 
Professor Waugh. 

'06.— Charles A. Tirrell, with Jens 
Jensen, Landscape Architect, 805 
Steinway Hall, Chicago. 

'08. — J. A. Hyslop requests letters 
for the second annual class-letter. 
His address until Dec. 1st is Pullman, 
Wash, and later Washington, D. C. 

'09. — L. S. Corbett has had an 
attack of malarial fever and it was 
thought that his illness would necessi- 
tate his return but he is recovering. 

'09. — G. R. Fulton is taking a 
special course in chemistry at M. I. T. 
preparatory to filling a position in Cuba 
as sugar-chemist. 

Chancellor Day announced at Syra- 
cuse University last week the gift of 
$50,000 from Mrs. Russell Sage. 
Chancellor Day said that the money 
would be used to start an endowment 
day fund for the teachers' college. 
The freshman class this year is the 
largest in the history of the university. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

R. H. Allen, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

H. W. Bianey, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 

H. W. French, President. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 




The ILL. FROSTS 
BARTLETT CO. 



AND 

Entomologists, 

STAMFORD, CONN. 

CARS 

Leave AQGiE COLLEQE for HOL- 
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CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AQdlE COL- 
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HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. C& 



THE COLLEGE 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 
BRUNONIA SURPRISED 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 2, 1909. 



No. 7 



RAY STANNARD BAKER 



Brown Has to Put in Her First Team to "The New Patriotism 
Win. Scores Don't Tell All. 



M. A. C. IN JAPAN 



Sunday Talk Our Alumni Founded Sapporo College Hon. Robert Luce Addresses Assembly. 



SCIENCE OF GOVERNMENT 



Given by the Journalist. 
The New Patriotism" 



In a game full of fumbles and pen- 1 "The New Patriotism was the 
alties our team was defeated at Prov- subject of the Sunday morning talk by 



»ce last Saturday. It was an inter- 
§> ng game to watch, for the teams 
% e apparently evenly matched most 
5 he time. We scored first on a 
fe D kick bv Morse from the 32 yard 
** , after only a few minutes of play. 
% ;n Brown, aided by the wind, suc- 
58 ded in scoring six points after ten 
more minutes. In the second half, 



Ray Stannard Baker. He said : 
"The old patriotism meant fighting 
with gun and sword for the country ; 
the New Patriotism is a harder and 
deeper fight for the honor of our nation 
and here are two ways to judge a man 
or a nation : one by the outer power 
and glory j and the other by the kind- 
ness, loyalty, honor and virtue. 



mure iiiiiiunso. •»• »■•- — • ■ , ... 

our opponents, strengthened by fresh test of civilization is its weakest citi- 



men from the side lines, scored 
another goal in four minutes. The 
rest of the game things came our way 
slightly, but we could not score. 

Except for the wind, it was an ideal 

day for football. We missed Roberts 

and Moreau and Hubbard's injured 

shoulder prevented his getting his man 

several times. Schermerhorn played 

a magnificent game, figuring in every 

play. Our men recovered many 

fumbles both of their own and of 

Brown's. This aided us materially in 

holding our opponents. Several of 



There is something wrong 
when one half lives in splendor 
while the other half starves. The law 
of the survival of the fittest does not 
apply, for statistics show that a great 
part of the poor and unemployed are 
skilled mechanics and even artists, 
and have the same ambitions as any- 
one else ; but they have beer, handi- 
capped by not having had any opportu- 
nity. A few men with advantages 
have gotten control and are taking 
more than their share of the world's 
goods, while the others have to suffer 



in the Land of the Rising Sun. 

The visit of the Japanese delegation 
was undoubtedly an affair of unusual 
importance to the College. It may be 
of interest to some of the alumni as 
well as to the students to have a record 
of the work done for Japan by men of 
M. A. C. The following statement 
was prepared by Professor Brooks : 

"Mr. Capron, who was at the head 
of the Department of Agriculture ol 
the United States, was employed by 
the Japanese government to take 
charge of what might best be trans- 
lated as, perhaps, 'The Colonial De- 
partment.' This Colonial Department 
had to do with the development of the 



You" in Law Making. 

The Assembly last Wednesday was 
addressed by Hon. Robert Luce of 
Boston, who took for his subject, "The 
Science of Government.'" He said In 
part : " I want to discuss the fundamental 
things in Politics. Politics is the science 
of government and is of great Impor- 
tance because it affects the great mass 
of people. There are two functions of 
government. The first consists of the 
work done by men working together for 
the common welfare. This spirit of 
co-operailon is growing every year, as 
is shown by the fact that more and 
more of the total wealth of this coun- 
try Is being spent for the common 



agriculture and other resources of the 



good. The second function of gov- 



our short kicks and forward passes | The solution of the problems that 



were successful, but our best one was 
spoiled by the officials who evidently 
did not follow the play closely, and 
called Goodnough back after a long 
gain. The officials were also negli- 
gent in permitting coaching from the 
Brown sidelines. 

Brown kicked off to Hubbard who 
returned the ball to the 35-yard line. 



with these conditions is the 
Golden Rule and the great law. 'He 
who is great among you, let him be 
servant to all.' 

"The test question in our beautiful 
country is: how do we treat our little 
ones and our weak ones? This ques- 
tion is always evaded and our country's 
accomplishments are boasted about. 



Schermerhorn recovered a fumble, The children of the poor are being 



and a penalty for offside forced us to 
kick, O'Brien stopping the run. back 
on the 55-yard line. O'Brien threw 
Youi g for a loss, and Brown punted, 



worn out before they mature ; there 
are a hundred thousand who cannot 
read or write and who are worn out 
by the time they reach the age of 



Morse running it back 15 yards. We twenty -five. Tramps are often simply 



punted, and a second later Brown tried 
a short kick which Hayden blocked, 
Schermerhorn falling on the ball after 
it had bounddd back to the 25-yard 
line. Morse immediately drop-kicked 
a goal, scoring 3 points for us. 

Brown's kick-off went to Hosmer, 
who advanced the ball to the 26-yard 
line, Goodnough made 5, but a 
penalty for offside put us 5 yards back. 
A short gain, then our kick went out- 
side on our 48-yard mark. Brown 



grownup child workmen. The for- 
eigner is worked as hard as possible, 
because he is poor and ignorant. 
Twelve hour days and seven day 

weeks and low wages spoil the family : culture. Other graduates 
life and prevent these people from Massachusetts Agricull 



northern portion of the empire, 
which has about the same climate as 
Massachusetts. 

Capron conceived the Idea of 
founding an agricultural college, and 
the head of the Department of Agri- 
culture, General Kuroda, headed a 
commission which traveled widely 
for the purpose of finding a model for 
an agricultural college which could 
carry out Capron's suggestions. Kur- 
oda, who was with them, came to 
America, and after visiting many 
other places, decided that America 
furnished the best model. He imme- 
diately sought to secure the services 
of President Clark, who was at the 
head of the M. A. C. to organize and 
start the agricultural college in Japan, 
President Clark was given a leave of 
absence for one year. He took with him 
two graduates of the institution, Wm. 
Wheeler and D. P. Penhallow. The 
agricultural college was established in 
Sapporo, and was the first agricultural 
college in the Japanese Empire. 

After alew months, Wm. P. Brooks 
joined the other Americans, taking 
the position of the Professor of Agri- 

of the 
College, 



ernment is that which concerns the re- 
lation of men In social aspects. No 
man is free who is not a slave. He 
must obev unwritten laws of custom. 
"The laws are made by the people, 
not by the legislature which only re- 
flects the desires of the people. The 
laws may be absurd or harmful, but 
we must not blame the legislators. 
To gain a point or to reform a law, we 
must inuuence our neighbors. Thai 
each one may do his share. The 
country owes Ex-president Roosevelt a 
heavy debt, for he brought to the front 
problems of common honesty, and 
brought us back to questions of right 
and wrong. This question of right and 
wrong varies with the standard of a 
community, and that standard depends 

on you. 

"In certain places, there Is no credit 
tn public service. This Is because 
people have allowed the standard 01 
politics to become lower. It Is up to 
you to change this. Good cannot be 
done without public approval. If you 
want to take part in government, join 
one of the great political parties. A 
political party does not represent the 
unanimous opinion of its members, but 
is a union of men who have in general 
the same itfeas. Parties are practi- 
cally new things. A hundred years 
ago, they were denounced by nearly 
all men, but now we have developed a 



being like American citizens. Most who later served longer or shorter 
negroes are left in total ignorance, are periods in Sapporo Agricultural College, 
deprived of their civil rights, and are : Dr. John C. Cutter 72, Caal H. 

treated nearly as slaves. While we ; Peabody ex-75, wh gradu a . lat e , , - ^ best 

are prosperous, we are not applying from M. I. T., HE. S ^^JV\ ^ party fights for leadership and 
the true test of greatness. Many ■ A. A. Brigham 78. Wheeler Uugh , Eac J^ « tQ that o{ 

,eagues for improvements are studying Mathematics and Engineering and h s j ^presents an op ^ 

successor in that work was Peabody. the other party. iuu 
Wheeler remained about four years. I public opinion which influences the 



started down the field, but Leonard 

recovered a fumble, and our kick again j aud improving these conditions. 

went out on Brown's 48-yard mark, j "All movements are towards the leg islator's. 

A forward pass gave them 4 yards. ' New Patriotism and some results are Penhallow ^^^^^\\ TYMnhubwn no generation of 

Another fumble, recovered by Raquet, being obtained ; but these movements try, rema » n,n | n *^ ,,V !^ y and wnich S o much is expected as yours. 

then a punt with a favorable wind are being fought against by the great- ter taught Z .ology . Anatomy boy r girl who does not know more 

put the ball on our 10-yard line, est and richest men in the land and Phyai ology fo "*^^^ 

Schermerhorn's kick was shortened by even at times by the church There bridge taug t Chem s y, for abou ft ^ ^ 

the wind, and the home team soon are two views to be taken of the situa- four and ™-™'* e ™^" ^ ers cannot keep pace with you in 

pushed the ball over our last line, tion: first, one of force, to allow the teaching Agriculture, Brooks taught 



[Continued on page 4.] 



[Continued on page 8.1 



[Continued on page 5.] 



[Continued on page 8. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 2, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 2, 1909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOASD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE, 1911, 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910, 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911, 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Asst. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, CoIIcr. Notes. 
News editor of this issue, Josiah C. Folsom '10. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed<tor— Everr day at 1 to 1-15 p. m. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30, 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 p. w. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. M. 
Thursday 1 1-1 5 to 12 m. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911. Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY, NOV. 2. No. 7 



A gentlemanly spirit is sometimes 
greatly wanting among the students of 
this college. This has often been 
noticeable in the class-room, and of 
late especially so in the dining hall. 
It is generally understood that a man 
comes to college to inprove, not to 
deteriorate. How many men consider 
it either courageous or gentlemanly for 
a crowd to "rough-house" one man 
when his back is turned ? 



A movement looking to the founda- 
tion of an M. A. C. literary magazine 
has been started. The idea seems to 
be, to start modestly, possibly as an 
occasional extra sheet to the Signal. 
The promoters will find many difficul- 
ties In their path. 

The Signal should remain essen- 
tially a newspaper, and introduction of 
literary matter would seem to be in- 
advisable. This ought to preclude the 
Idea of combining with the Signal. 

It is doubtful if there is enough 
developed literary talent in college to 
fill a paper which could of itself be a 
credit to the college. If this were an 
institution with an English course 
especially for training strong periodical 
writers, the story might be different, 
It is not easy to write a really good 
news article, a task in itself; and it is 
far harder to write a good story or 
review. The Signal Board receives 
practically no contributions except 
those from the competitors. The stu- 
dent body is willing only to read our 
paper and tell us how to prepare the 
next one. 

If talent can be found to fill the Lit, 
the work is not half done. Money 
must be provided. That is the biggest 
Item and the hardest to handle. The 
Signal finds it hard to make ends 
meet. The student body and the 
alumni can hardly be asked to support 
another paper. It is increasingly hard 
to obtain advertising for a weekly col- 
lege paper, especially that of local 
firms. And advertising in an obscure 
little literary monthly would be almost 
the gift of the advertiser. The busi- 
ness management of the Lit would be 
almost sure to fail. 

The Signal will welcome a suc- 
cessful M. A. C. literary periodical 
which can be a credit to the Alma 
Mater we love, but doubts if it is really 
feasible to start one as yet. 



The attendance of the students at 
the Sunday talks is rather disappoint- 
ing. President Butterfield has done 
well in bringing before M. A. C. men 
those who give these talks, No one 
in the country knows more about the 
things concerning which they spoke 
than these men. O. R. Lovejoy 
spoke on the child labor question, Hon. 
A. T. Sweeney on our juvenile 
criminal laws, R. D. Woods on social 
settlements, R. S. Baker on our lower 
classes. These speakers are the best 
qualified of any in the country and 
theirs are all vital topics of the day, and 
ought to be of deep interest to any 
wide-awake body of young men as we 
of M. A. C. are supposed to be. 
Other talks of as great value are to be 
given Sunday. Men, you don't know 
what you are missing. Some of the 
great opportunities of life are passing 
by you unheeded. Wake up to it t 

>•- 

COMMUNICATION. 

(Communications to the Signal concerning mat- 
ters of general Interest are welcomed. The Signal 
is not to be held responsible for the opinions thus 
expressed.) 

Editor of The College Signal: — 

The trend of M. A. C. is toward 
expansion. The test five years of the 
history of the College has witnessed a 
startling revulsion against apathy and in 
difference to the broadening of the col- 
lege. The number of students that 
flock yearly to M. A. C. has increased 
with a rapidity suggestive to the realiza- 
tion of the wildest dream of M. A. C. 
men ;courses have increased and broad- 
ened ; educational standards have been 
raised, athletics have been widened to 
include sports that give all students an 
opportunity to gain distinction, and 
other activities have been intensified 
to keep pace with the rapid expansion 
of the college. 

It therefore seems disappointing to 
find M. A. C. at this state of growth 
devoid of any literary organ to voice 
the ever increasing friendliness of col- 
lege spirit and college loyalty of its men, 
to encourage and develop the literary 
ambitions of its students and to secure 
from oblivion the ideals and sentiments 
that are fostered under her broad 
banners and in its inspiring environ- 
ments. Surely, this matter is worthy 
of the attention of every M. A. C. 
man. 

The establishment of a literary 
magazine had been simmering for 
some time until frank and open discus- 
sion was precipitated by a meeting held 
for the purpose last Tuesday evening. 




WE DO 



SHOE REPHIRIHG 



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BEST POSSIBLE 
MANNER 



Our Repairing Department is well 
equipped with everything that's mod- 
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Machinery. 

EXPERT WORKMEN DO THE WORK 
OUR PRICES ARE MODERATE 
Bring your Shoes here for repairs and see how promptly, how well, 
and reasonably " We'll Mend 'Em." This Shoe Store is always at the front 
with the best of Shoe Service in every line. 



JAaMKS it. page, 

Next to Post Office 



E. E MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions rilled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT & SHOE 
REPAIRING 

|at 
LOWEST PRICES 



Open from 7 a 
All kinds of 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 



m. 



m. to 
All kinds of Shoe Shi 



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THURBER'S 



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Indestructible Cylinder Records 



KODAKS 



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PHOTO GRAPHIC SU PPLIES 

Be sure you get an 

EASTHAN FILH 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
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To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
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why YOU should buy 



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Deuel's Drag store 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



I There are difficulties in the road, but 
There are SeYen gOOd reaSOnS they are not insurmountable if every 

student in true M.AC, spirit is willing 
to lend a hand. Lend both hands to a 
cause that will ultimately reflect the 
glory of our Alma Mater in the splen- 
did expression of enthusiasm of its 
sons. Soon M. A. C. men will be 
confronted with the question of giving 
their active support to the establish- 
ment of a literary magazine. Their 
'reply should display undubitable evi- 
dence of the temper of a broad M. A. 

C. 

(Signed) Bernhardt Ostrolenk. 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



Nov. 



Nov 



Folsom '10 



Nickless '10 



SUIT CASE 
STICKERS 

2 FOR 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

2.— Stockbridge club, 7-00 p.m. 
C. J. Blanchard.U. S. Recla- 
mation Service. 
3.— Assembly. 1-15 p.m. Ad- 
dress by C. J. Blanchard. 
Debating club in Agricultural 
room, 6-45 p. m 

N 0Vi 4.— Y. M. C. A., 6-45 p. m. in 
Chapel. Leader, Mr. McKay. 

N OVi 5. — J. E. Tower, editor of Good 
Housekeeping, at English Con- 
ference, on magazines. 

Nov. 6. — Mettawampe Trek. 

Nov. 7.— 9-15 a. m., Sunday morning 
service In Chapel, Charles W. 
Blrtwell of Boston. 

Nov. 9. —Stockbridge club, 7-00 p. m. 




Aggie 
Store 

College Seal Stationery. 
Clapp '12 Beers 'i 2 



An $8 Pen 
For 1 Cent 

I will award a Pearl and Gold 
Crocker Pen to the person who 
can write legibly the greatest 
number of times on a postal 
card (using one side only) the 
following phrase : 

••THE CROCKER 
FOUNTAIN PEN." 
••You Blow It To Fill It." For 
sale by E. E. Millett. 

All cards must be written 
in ink and must contain the 
name of the contestant. 

Contest closes Nov. io, '09. 

Send all cards to 

E. E. MILLETT, 

Amherst, Mass. 



AN INVITATION 

Department of Music, 

Amherst College, Oct. 21 
My Dear President Butterfield: 

I would like to extend a cordial 
invitation to your faculty and wives, 
also to your student body, to join our 
chorus and orchestra. It Is just as 
much a town affair as a college ; I 
would welcome warmly all singers and 
players from your part of the town. 
This year we have chosen the "Elijah" 
and Mozart's Requiem Mass for per- 
formance. 

Our rehearsals are held Monday 
evenings at 7-20 in College Hall. 
Part rehearsals are on Tuesdays, 
Sopranos and Altos from 3-45 to 4-45, 
and tenors and basses from 4-45 to 
5-45, in the same place. 
Very truly, 

W. P. Bigelow, 



This comment in the Hartford 
1 Courant is interesting: "There is con- 
siderable criticism of the plate judges 
for allowing size rather than uniformity 
and type to weigh most largely in the 
scale of points, while in the commer- 
cial department of barrels and boxes 
Prof. F. C. Sears of M. A. C. and C. 
L. Gold of the Connecticut Pomologi- 
cal Society are winning great praise 
for the thorough way in which their 
work has been done, even to the 
dumping of barrels and boxes and the 
careful inspecting of every apple before 
rendering any decision. The superb 
work of these two judges ought to be a 
great stimulus to better grading and 
packing. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CIOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 

one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 

The mixing of fertilizers takes into account 
geology, which tells of the formation and composition 
of soUs* chemistry, which shows the needs of crop 
and how they can be supplied ; botany which tcHs of 
the structure of crops and their habits of growth 
bacteriology, which treats of «f *^™£"W 
without which crops are bound to fail. Do not he 
Tessons of the class room result in formulae : para e 
in a large degree, to the Srockbndge Special Fertili- 
zers ? 

Study the plant food problem 

RAWlfPD FERTILIZER CO., 

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directLtor route from New York to B~. .^J*-^ ^ 

Banquets a specialty. 



C&rp?rvter St /Aorehous*, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 2, 1909. 




The College Signal, Tnesday, November, 2, 1909. 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL. SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 



Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Rain Cloth, - $3-$° P 61 " yd. Trouserings, 



$12.50 

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$3.50 per yard. 



I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



may be found at 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUOS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



witb a full line of College Supplies 



EWELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



riOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins 5octs. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3ct. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 " Broken Bank and Confederate 

Bills $ 1. 00 

Send for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars and 
Selling price list. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



M.D. GILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 



C. A. MOFFET. 
1079-3. 



GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Street. 

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GOX SONS 

AND 

VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 




RUNONIA SURPRISE 

[Continued from first page.] 

Regnier kicked the goal. Score, 6-3. 

Schermerhorn's kickoff over the 
line was put in play on Brown's 25 
yard mark. A 15-yard penalty for 
Crowther taking the ball through cen- 
ter put it on the 10-yard line. The 
Brunonian backs could not make the 
distance, and Morse made a fair catch 
of their punt. An offside penalty put 
us back 5 yards. Brown got our 
onslde kick on their 24-yard line, but 
they fumbled, and we got It back. 
Morse's drop was blocked and recov- 
ered by Brown near their end of the 
field. The home team braced, and 
worked the ball to the middle of the 
field when time was called. Score, 
6-3. 

The Providence aggregation con- 
tinued their brace in the second half 
long enough to score once more. 
Several long runs, one of 40 yards, let 
Young score. Regnier kicked his 
second goal. Score 12-3. 

Schermerhorn again drove the ball 
over the cross-bar, and a little later 
recovered a fumble, but our forward 
pass was taken by Brown. Holding in 
the line caused a penalty that put the 
ball on the 22-yard line, whence 
Brown punted. Several exchanges 
followed. A pass, Morse to Scher- 
merhorn, after the former had been 
tackled, netted 8 yards. Another, 
Morse to Hubbard, which Goodnough 
got after Hubbard and a Brown player 
had touched it, was not allowed by the 
officials who claimed that Goodnough 
had no right to the ball, and we were 
penalized. We punted, and Brown 
gradually worked the ball back to the 
center. A 15-yard penalty against 
them put the ball on their 43 yard line. 
O'Brien threw Sprackling for an 8 
yard loss. Aided by this, we held 
for downs. Baker replaced Powers. 
An onside kick to Hosmer put us on 
our opponent's 28 yard mark. Good- 
nough recovered a fumble, then 
Morse's drop kick was blocked. Two 
gains and a penalty for holding put 
Brown on its 5 yard line ; but they 
advanced to the 25 yard line, and 
kicked, Goodnough coming back ten 
yards to the center. We lost five for 
offside. McGarr replaced Walker. 
We punted, and Brown carried the 
ball to the 55-yard line in five rushes. 
Then a penalty for starting before the 
ball, and a small loss forced a punt, 
which we immediately sent back, and 
the game ended. 

The line-up : 

BROWN. M. A. C. 

Ashbaugh (Leith), 1. e. r. e., Hubbard 

Kulp, 1. t. r. t.. Schermerhorn 

Ayler, 1. g. r. g., Walker, McGarr 




fflwTl. 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
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Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 



THE SHOEMAN." 



Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Hlock 
Amherst, Mass. 



j*E. N. PARISEAU.j* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



; Sisson, c. 

J Corp r. g. 1. g.. 

: Raquet, r. t. 

Regnier (Gorman), r. e. 

Crowther (Sprackling) q. b. 

Young. 1. h. b. 1 

Adams (Hills), r. h. b. .1 h. 

Kohler (High), f. b. 
Score— Brown 12, M. A. 



c, Hayden 

Powers, Baker 

1. t., Leonard 

1. e., O'Brien 

q. b., Morse 

. h. b., Blaney 

b., Goodnough 

f. b., Hosmer 

C. 3 Touch- 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 

Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



downs— Koher, Young. Goals from touch- 



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downs— Regnier 2. Goal from field — 
Morse. Referee— Marshall of Harvard. 
Umpire— Thorpe of Columbia. Field judge 
— Hunt of Brown. Time — 25-minute 
halves. 



T. Iv. PAIGE 



SPORTING GOODS 

STORE 
and REPAIR SHOP. 

Rear First Nat. Hank. 



TYPEWRITERS 



For Sale or Rent. 



TENNIS GOODS 



FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 



M. A. C. IN JAPAN 

[Continued from first page.] 

Botany after the departure of Pen- 
hallow. Brooks's work in Agriculture 
was taken by Brigham, after the 
departure of the former. Brooks's 
term of service was nearly twelve 
years. Brigham remained about 
four years. President Clark stayed 
about one year. 

The influence of the Sapporo Agri- 
cultural College has been particularly 
striking in the following directions : 

1st, in promoting the agricultural 
development and improvement of 
northern Japan. 

2d, in educating men for an admin- 
istrative service of the Japanese gov- 
ernment, particularly in its relations 
with agriculture. 

3d, in educating teachers who have 
become leaders in the development of 
secondary education in agriculture. 

4th, in promoting experimental work 
in agriculture. 

5th, in educating journalists, both 
agricultural and political, who have 
taken a leading part in the great 
movements of recent times. 

The President of the college for 
the first year was Clark. 

From 1877 to 1879, Wheeler '71. 
From '79 to '80, Penhallow 73. 
From '80 to '86 Brooks 75." 

Kenyon L. Butterfield. 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 
Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



GUNS and AMMUNITION 



HOCKEY SKATES and 



STICKS 



SNOW SHOES and 



SKIS. 



E. A. Thompson 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Work on the new game room in the 
basement of North College has been 
resumed and wiil be carried to a finish 
now. 

Prof. W. P. Lockwood spoke last 
Wednesday before a grange meeting 
upon "Improved Methods in Dairy 
Farming." 

The college has recently purchased 
the old Owen orchard, which is just 
north of the Clark orchard. The trees 
are being thoroughly cared for by the 
class in Pomology. 

Instead of having an ontside speaker 
at the Y. M. C. A. meeting last Thurs- 
day evening, one of the students, J. C. 
Bailey ' 10, led the meeting. He spoke 
on "Law. "An open meeting followed. 

At a recent meeting of the directors 
of the Mass. Creamery Association at 
the Draper Hotel, Northampton, it was 
voted to accept the invitation of the 
college to hold the January meeting of 
the association here. 

H. D. Smith, president of the 
Massachusetts State Poultry Associa- 
tion gave a talk of unusual interest 
before the Stockbridge Club last Tues- 
day evening. His subject was "How 
South Shore Soft Broilers are 
Raised."' 

At a recent meeting of the Fresh- 
man class, Roswell E. Hubbard of 
Hatfield, was elected captain of the 



Something for M. A C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ,' 

Tailor and Presser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Kent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Early and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants #1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 



Store 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Telephone 54-4- 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

THe Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 




_% .A»y ^^M 




Fraternity 


and 




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and 


Invitations 




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Class Inserts 


Menus 




Ma 


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for Annuals 


Leather Dance 
Cases and 




\ 


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Fraternity 
and Class 


Covers 

Wedding 






s 


Calling Cards 


Stationery 


Invitations and 





WORKS, 17th STREET <& LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 2, 1909. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 

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HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORKER DRUE STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone 59-4. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

P LUMBE RS. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 




Insurance on Students' 
Furniture, Etc, $1.00 per 
$100. for 3 years while in any 
College or private building. 



W. R. BROWN 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



10; Main St. 



Northampton, Mass, 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Hlock, Amhkrst, Mass. 



Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
Ota lflA<M< i.:tot<>rt ■».!*!. 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 2, 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam £ Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



football team. Hubbard was captain 
of his high school team and has been 
playing a fast game as end on the 
'varsity this fall. 

The junior class has elected the 
committee for the junior promenade as 
follows:— E. L. Winn, chairman, A. 
P. Bursley, secretary and treasurer, I. 
W. Davis, N. H. Hill, E. A. Larra- 
bee, H. A. Pauly, P. W. Pickard, F. 
A. Prouty, L. O. Stevenson, and H. 
W. Blaney. 

A meeting of those interested in the 
foundation of an M. A.C. literary peri- 
odical was held Oct. 26. While all 
who expressed themselves hoped that 
a literary magazine would be estab- 
lished here at some time, there were 
many pointed opinions given, mostly 
doubting the feasibility of starting such 
a paper at this time. A committee 
was appointed to look into the matter 
and report at a future meeting. The 
members are Ostrolenk, Hallowell and 
O'Flynn. 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

Amended by-laws of Phi Kappa 
Phi relative to membership: 

Sec. 2. The number of under- 
graudates elected in any one year shall 
not exceed one-fifth of the number of 
candidates for the baccalaureate 
degree. Candidates for the higher 
degrees may, upon nomination, be can- 
didates for election to the Fraternity. 

Sec. 3. At the regular meeting 
held the third week in October of each 
year, not more than three seniors may 
be elected, who shall have attained 
the grade of 85 per cent for the first 
three years of the course. Other 
members from the senior class may 
be elected at the regular meeting held 
during the third week in April. 

Sec. 4. The second annual stated 
meeting for the election of members 
from the senior class shall be held dur- 
ing the third week in April. The 
scholarship ranks for determining the 
elegibility of the student shall be on 
the basis of the first three years and a 
half of college work. The rank 
attained must be 85 per cent. 

Sec. 7. The initiation and admis- 
sion to the Fraternity of all candidates 
elected during the academic year shall 
be during Commencement week. 



DEBATING CLUB 

The regular meeting of the Debat- 
ing Society was held in the Agjicul- 
tural Recitation room last Wednesday 
evening. After a short business meet- 
ing, Mr. McKay gave an interesting 
and instructive talk on parliamentary 
practice. This was one of a series of 
talks he is to give before the society. 
Following this was the usual debate. 
The subject was, Resolved, That women 
should have the same civic rights as 
men. The speakers on the affirma- 
tive side were Ostrolenk 'II, and 
French '13; those on the negative 
Borden '13 and McLaine '10. Avery 
interesting debate was developed, 
and the judges had some difficulty in 
deciding the winners, but finally 
announced their opinion that the 
affirmative had the best of the 
argument. 



1909. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Wheieas, It hath pleased God in His infi- 
nite wisdom to take unto Himself the 
j mother of our beloved classmate. J. Francis 
J Dee, be it 

Resolved, That we. the members of the 

j class of Nineteen Hundred and Twelve do 

extend to him and his family our sincere 

I sympathy in this their hour of sorrow ; and 

be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions 

be sent to our bereaved classmate, and that 

a copy be filed in the records of the class 

\ and that a copy be published in the College 

Signal. 

Ezra I. Shaw, > „ 

f For the 



George W. Tupper, > 
Charles C. Pearson, ) 



Class. 



'07. — J. 0. Chapman is very ill 
with nervous prostration. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ENGLISH. 

Mr. J. E. Tower, editor of Good 
Housekeeping will speak before the 
English Conference Friday night, Nov. 
5, at 8 p. m. about magazines and 
magazine making. The meeting 
will be open to all members of the 
college. Mr. Tower recently spoke 
before the Press Club of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 

The class in Agricultural Journal- 
ism is preparing copy for the first num- 
ber of the "periodical" it will issue. 
R. A. Waldron '10 will be managing 
editor for the first two issues. The 
publication date for the first number is 
Nov. 25. The paper will be type- 
written. 

Several magazine and newspaper 
editors have written, suggesting the 
publication by the college of a printed 
periodical in connection with the class 
work in journalism. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

The department has issued printed 
lists of the required reading for the 
graduate students in entomology, 
which covers about 15,000 pages of 
reading. 

A fine specimen of the parasite fun- 
gus Cordyceps Militaris growing on a 
large moth pupa was recently donated 
to the department by Mr. G. E. Norris 
of Waltham. 

The first meeting of the Entomolog- 
ical Journal Club will be held Nov. 9 
at the Insectary. 

A number of southern insects of 
economic importance were recently 
sent to the department by H. M. Rus- 
sell '06. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The examining committee of the 
state Board of Agriculture inspected 
the station last Thursday. 

The station is installing some 
entirely original devices for research in 
connection with the work in fertilizers 
for cranberries. They were designed 
by Professor Brooks. The scheme is 
simple. A large tile set into a cement 
foundation in the ground is connected 
with a tile of smaller diameter by a 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



pipe from bottom to bottom. Devices 
which allow only water to enter keep 
the pipe clear. From the small tile 
leads an overflow, with a valve. The 
large tile will be filled with soils and 
cranberry plants set in. A device to 
be set onto the tile provides for flood- 
ing the plants at the proper season. 
The water table of the tile soil will be 
controlled by varying the water level in 
the smaller tile. Into this water will 
be put the fertilizers used. Inter- 
change of water between the tiles will 
carry the dissolved plant-foods from 
one to the other so the water taken 
from the small tile will have the same 
materials in solution as that in the soil 
of the large. Cnemical study of this 
water will reveal, it is expected, what 
becomes of these plant-foods, some- 
thing now entirely unknown. 

PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 

The department has recently im- 
ported from Germany a Kroeker mod- 
ification of the Berthelot-Mehler Cal- 
orimeter with accessories to be used 
in Its research work, especially in feed 
stuffs. 

The October circular of the station 
is No. 25 (a revision of No. 1) en- 
titled "Cottonseed Meals" and was 
written by Dr. J. B. Lindsey. It 
treats of the manufacture, uses, quality 
and sampling of the meals. 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD. CONN. 



THOMAS 



PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 

SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



LUNCHES 



At the Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 18-24, 1909, fruit grown on Thomas Phot< 
phate Powder, (Basic Slag Phosphate ) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, P'our 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by Mr. 

Georgi A. Drew, of Connecticut, M. A. C Class 
of 1897. (Our pamphlet " Up To 1 >atc Fruit Grow- 
ing" is sent free if you mention The College Signal) 



The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 



24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 
Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
Alumni 1 Please send in payment 
($1.50) for your subscriptions. 

The twenty -fourth annual banquet of 
the M. A. C. Alumni Club of New 
York will be held at the Hotel St. 
Denis, New York City, Dec. 3. 

'83. — D. O. Nourse, professor of 
Animal Husbandry at Clemson College 
in South Carolina, spent the summer 
in Bolton. He has recently bought a 
large farm at Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, 
N. Y. and will convert it into a fruit 
farm. He expects to occupy it him- 
self in a few years. 

'92. --J. L. Field of Chicago, 111. 
recently spent a few days at his former 
home in Leverett and during this time 
visited college. 

'86.— Shultis & Son, of which firm 
N. S. Shultis is a member, has con- 
tributed $2,500 toward the proposed 
Boston Y. M. C. A. building. 

'97. — G. A. Drew took a silver cup, 
a silver medal, $1 10 in prizes and a 
number of premiums on his apple 
exhibits at the New England Fruit 
Show in Boston, Oct. 19-24. 

'98. — The firm, Wiley & Hoffman, 
has issued a neat aluminum business 
card, having on the reverse conversion 
factors for the computation of fertilizer \ 
formulae. 

'01. — R. D. Smith is the author of 
Bulletin 203 of the North Carolina 
Experiment Station entitled "Corn 
Weevils and Other Grain Insects." 

'03. — W. E. Tottingham has 
recently published with Prof. A. B. 
Hart of the University of Wisconsin 



We also distribute from Boston, Mass* Belfast, Mo., Haltimore, 
Md., Wilmington, N.C., Savannah, (ia., and C h a rle sto n , S ' 



FATIMA£^ 

# 20 for 15 c+s O 




"To the victor belongs the 

V spoils." It's double satisfaction 

to inspect the trophy through the haze of 
a comforting, aromatic Fatima. 



A quality cigarette of more pleasing 
fragrance than the ordinary Turkish 
smoke— an ideal blend everyone likes. 
Because there's no expense for bril- 
liant boxes, gilt frills, etc., we put ten 
extra cigarettes in every package. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 




i 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 



2, 1909. 



Do you want Security for Horrowing 
Money to continue your College 
( ourse? 

Life Insurance Offers to Yon a cheat 
an,t Legitimate form 0/ Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving Q, I)„ris, Afmk 12 North 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College Allen Bros. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Growth in attendance 1904 — 1909 
For the past five years the growth in attendance has been 
a steady one. The following statistics represent this growth 
both in Numbers and Percentage: 



Enrolment of Students 
of College grade 

I98 

214 



Increase over previous year. 
In numbers 



I904-O5 
I905-06 
I906-07 
I907-08 
1 908-09 
1 909- 1 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



an interesting monograph on "The 
Nature of Some of the Acid Soluble 
Phosphorous Compounds of Important 
Feeding Materials." 

'04. — F. D. Couden, formerly ento- 
mologist for the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and law student at George 
Washington University, has been 
admitted to the bar. The business 
cards are out announcing that he has 
formed a partnership with H. W. 
Meyers for the general practice of law 
under the firm name of Meyers & 
Couden with offices at 432-3 Pioneer 
Building, Seattle, Wash. 

'04. — A new department of Plant 
Breeding has recently been organized 
at Cornell and has been put in charge 
of Dr. A. W. Gilbert. This new r 
department is on a par with all other 
departments of the College of Agricul- 
ture. There are now registered in it 
55 students in the beginners' course 
and 20 graduate students. 

'04.— S. B. Haskell spoke Oct. 26 
before the class in economics at Mt. 
Holyoke College upon "Corn and 
Wheat Production in the United 
States." 

'06. — The September Gardeners' 
Chronicle of America contained an in- 
teresting and instructive article on 
"The City Shade Tree Question" by 
Addison T. Hastings, Jr. 

'07.— W. F. Chace, Third St., 
Portland, Ore. 

'09.— P. p. Cardin is the author of 
a short article on trees in a recent 
publication of the Cuban Experiment 
Station at Santiago. 

•09.— R. C. Lindblad, Depew Inn, 
Depew, N. Y., with the N. Y. C. & 
H. R. R. R. 

'09. — J. T. Oliver spent last week 
Sunday in Amherst. 



228 
252 
289 

Total increase in numbers 
Total increase in percent 



16 

24 

37 
61 

152 
76.6 



In percent, 
(approximate) 



8 

6-5 
10 

14.7 

21. 1 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



The College Senate, 
Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Debating Club, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

R. H. Allen, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhom, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 

H. W. French, President 

H. J. Baker, President 



Amherst, Mass. 



Eleven Index, 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Hear Henry Fish's 
Store. 

G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AOtilE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AQOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mini, past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



M 



RAY STANNARD BAKER 

f Continued from first page.] 



strong to do what they wish with the 
weak ; and the second of service, to 
encourage the poor, not hate them ; to 
serve them, not enslave them. It is 
plain which view we are to take, and 
we will be judged by this, our 'New 
Patriotism.' " 



Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



SCIENCE OF GOVERNMENT 

[Continued from first page.] 



matters of science in general. This 
college should be maintained for the 
welfare of the country. You should 
realize that this function of government 
cannot be accomplished unless you 
realize the value of good citizenship. 



r 'Tffi COLLEGE SIGNAL 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 9, 1909- 



Vo-£ X. 

l/ SPRINGFIELD 



No. 8 



ON SATURDAY 



drubbing from n. h. | DDS SEEM IN FAVOR OF SPRINGFIELD WESTERN agriculture 



Lack of Team Work and Spirit Loses 
Us the Game, 17-0. 

New Hampshire S'ate College de- 
feated our team last Saturday in Man- 
chester by 17-0. It was the first time 
they had ever defeated us. They 
started in by scoring six points in four 
minutes, and got five more before the 
half closed. Our men seemed to be 
powerless to stop the fierce plunging of 
the N. H. backs and tackles, and 
played without team work. Schermer- 
hom was unable to stay in the game 
more than a few minutes, for he was 
troubled by cramps. Hubbard played 
well. Morse was In very poor form, 
but ran back one kick 50 yds. The 
team fumbled often, made weak 
tackles, and were slow generally. Our 
playing was worse than in the 
Worcester game. The summary : 



N. H S. C M. A. C. 

Jonet. 1. e., r. e., Hubbard 

H. Sanborn, 1. t., 

r. t., Schermerhom, Baker 
Davison. 1. g., r. g., Walker 

Proud, c, c, Hayden 

Morgan, r. g., 1. g.. Powers, Samson 

Lawrence, Pettingill.r. t., 1. t., Leonard 

Read, r. e.. 1 e.. O'Brien 

Twomey. McPheters, q. b.. q. b., Morse 
Loud. Watson. 1 h. b., r. h. b.. Blaney 

Chase, r. h. b., l.h.b. .Roberts, Coodnough 
E. Sanborn, f. b.. f. b.. Moreau, Hosmer 
Score. New Hampshire state college 17. 
Touchdowns. E. Sanborn 2. Watson. Goals 
from touchdowns, E. Sanborn 2. Umpire 
Donnelly of Dartmouth. Referee, McGrail 
of Dartmouth. Field judge. Brice of Man- 
chester. Linesman, C. C. Holden. Time 
30m halves. 



Our Victory Depends on Spirit of Team and Backers. S. T. S. 

Last Victory in 1892. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Nov. 10 — Interclass Crosscountry run. 
Due to arrive at Experiment 
Station at 1-30 p. m. 
Debating Club in Agricultural 
room at 6-45 p. m. 

Nov. 1 1— Y. M. C. A., at 6-45 p. m. 
in Chapel. Leader, M. O. Mer- 
chant, Amherst '09. 

Nov. 13— Football: M. A. C. vs. S. 
T. S. at Springfield. Game 
called at 3-00 p. m. 

Nov. 14 — Sunday morning service in 
Chapel at 9-15 a. m. 

Nov. 16 — Stockbridge Club in Agri- 
cultural room at 7-00 P. M. 



The last game on our schedule is in 
sight. Next Saturday our football 
team lines up against Training School 
on the Springfield grounds, with both 
fnstiiutions present in full force. 
From the performance of the two 
teams it seems like a sure victory for 
Training School, for they have won 
four games out of five played, losing 
only to Yale, by six touchdowns. 
Tney beat Amherst 6-5, and Tufts by 
the same score, although the Medford 
aggregation played all around them. 
Springfield won on a lucky and brilliant 
play by Winters, after Tufts had 
pushed the ball down into the shadow 
of Springlield's goal posts several 
times. Three weeks ago T. S. 
defeated the strong Willistan seminary 
team 5-0. 

But the team that furnishes most of 
the "dope" for comparing Springfield 
with us is Worcester P. I. After we 
had lost a 2-0 game to W. P. 1., 
Springfield turned around and gave 
them a 17-0 beating. On this com- 
parison of results, and our recent 
defeat at Manchester, the training 
school people base their hopes for 
victory next Saturday. 

Our season has been a poor one. 
One victory, two ties, and five defeats, 
would seem to be enough to permit 
our opponents to hope for anything, 
and with good reason to expect their 
hopes to be fulfilled. Saturday's 
showing was not encouraging to our 
supporters, but it should not be forgot- 
ten that in 1907 Springfield confi- 
dently expected and predicted victory, 
yet iost, and in 1908, under the same 
conditions, could only tie the score. 
Since athletic relations with T. S. 
were established in 1890, we have 
been victorious eight times out of 
twelve games, one being a tie. We 
scored 118 points to our opponent's 
83- In the last eight games they 
have scored nine points, five last year 
and four in 1906. 

Viewing this year's situation in an 
unprejudiced light, it is hard to see 



how we can predict victory. We can 
only hope and trust that our team will 
shake its spell, and, under the stimulus 
of a vigorous application of Massachu- 
setts spirit by our entire student body, 
carry Springfield off its feet, and our 
college to victory. 



GLEE CLUB TRY OUT 

The management of the musical 
association announces a tryout of voices 
for selection of the Glee club, to be 
held in the Chapel tomorrow evening 
at 6-30. The meeting will be in 
charge of Mr.E. L. Sumner, director of 
the Worcester County Music school, 
Worcester. Mr. Sumner was director 
of the Amherst College Glee club for 
ten years, is now director of music at 
the State Normal school, and helps 
select the chorus, for the annual Wor- 
cester Music Festival. Once before, 
this year, a call for glee club candi- 
dates was issued a\d a very small 
number responded. The management 
wishes to start a real glee club in this 
college and anyone who can sing at 
all is urged to come out ; everyone 
will be given a chance and tne very 
best singers will be chosen. 



CHAS. W. BIRTWELL SPEAKS. 

Informal Talk By Secretary Of 

Children's Aid Society 

Of Boston. 

Mr. Birtweil in his talk, Sunday 
morning, did not confine himself to 
any particular subject, but dwelt in the 
main upon the efforts to better the 
condition of poor and neglected chil- 
dren in this country. Mr. Birtweil 
said in part, "You have no idea how 
much misfortune neglect works in the 
lives of little children in our cities. 
We are beginning, however, to realize 
this, and business men, lawyers, finan- 
ciers, actors, all high in their profes- 
sion, are asking, 'Is this necessary? 
Can it not be prevented'?" 

"The police courts, the judges are 

[Continued on page 6.] 



Blanchard of the Reclamation Service 
Gives Illustrated Lecture. 

A talk, illustrated with lantern slides, 
on the growth of agriculture in the 
great New West, was given by Mr. 
C. J. Blanchard of the U. S. Reclam- 
ation Service at last Wednesday's 
assembly. Before the slides were 
shown he gave a short talk on the 
present and future of agricultural pur- 
suits. 

He said in part: "Economic 
courses are shaping our agriculture 
along new lines and it is now accepted 
as an important scientific profession. 
It is the aim of Agricultural Education 
to instruct the farmer, so that his sons 
will no longer be ashamed to stay In 
the country. While provincialisms 
still exist, the exchange of Ideas 
among farmers and the improvement 
of rural society have added a great 
deal to the value of agriculture. Men 
with politic*! Instincts should be 
brought before the farmer and intro- 
duce co-operation and organization. 

"In the new west, millions of acres 
of desert land, containing the richness 
of centuries, are being opened to culti- 
vation. Here there is every oppor- 
tunity for brain and brawn, new ideas 
are invited, and optimism Is bred. In 
each new agricultural district, associa- 
tions are formed with officers and 
leaders to organize the raising and dis- 
tribution of crops. Railroad expense 
is made cheaper by shipping large 
amounts, the quality of goods is im- 
proved, the best methods of packing 
assure good markets and the highest 
cash prices ; and whereas the disor- 
ganized farmer overstocked the mar- 
ket, these united business men always 
have a demand for their commodities. 
"All the latest methods of agricul- 
ture are employed, even to heating 
their orchards by means of smoke boxes 
and sprinkling the country roads. In 
this union the small producer has the 
same chance as the large producer, 
providing his products are as good. 
Old and obsolete methods are being 
abandoned, elementary agriculture is 
being taught to school children, and in 
another generation farming will be 
conducted strictly as a business." 



[Continued on page 4.] 



Cross Country Finish, Wednesday, 1.30, at Exp. Sta. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 9, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, Novembe r 9, 1909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910. Editor-in-Chief 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. 

HENRY A. BROOKS 1910, 

LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 

EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911 



Asst. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 



gan's football team both in the 
and back-field. 



line 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911. Colleg. Notes. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Editor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. m. 

Tuesday. Thursday and Fridays from b-30, 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 1 a. m. and 6-30 to 
7 p.m. 
Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 M. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Asst. Business Manager 

a^o T C „ BRETT ' ,912> CircuiatL 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



p£ nt Offlc. M 8econd - cUM •"•"•«■ »< «h« Amherst 
Vol. XX. TUESDAY, NOV. 9. No. 8 



Next week Alumni Issue. 



The editorial concerning alumni 
notes published a few weeks ago, was 
meant only as a reminder and was not 
written merely to find fault. We 
recognize the importance of our Alumni 
Notes and strive to make them newsy. 
Please take the editorial in the spirit 
that it was written. 



Again the question of a Lit. is 
brought to us through a communica- 
tion. We wish to say that while we 
are in sympathy with the movement, 
the Signal feels that it cannot stand 
the extra load that would come if it 
was brought out in conjunction with 
the Sicnal. As far as the magazine's 
being published, the student body are 
the ones to decide that and not the 
Signal. 



Buy, borrow, beg, or steal but go to 
Springfield on Saturday. It's every 
man's duty to be on the side lines and 
stand behind the team that is once 
more going to do things to S. T. S. 
It has been seventeen years since 
Springfield has defeated us and if 
every man is there, not in spirit only 
but in body as well, with the team we 
have this year, she will not defeat Us 
this time. Come out to the mass 
meetings this week and get some of 
that good old M. A. C. spirit in your 
blood and let it all out Saturday. Say 
to your classmate, "I'll be there. 
Will you?" 

COLLEGE NOTES 

H. P. Crosby '09 visited college 
Oct. 31. 

Isaac Lipman, an ex-' 10 man now 
a junior in Cornell, visited the college 
last Friday. 

Daniels ex-'l 1 is playing on Michi- 



Mr. Manning, the Boston landscape 
architect who is planning our campus, 
was looking over the college grounds 
last week. 

The work on the new Entomological 
Laboratory is being pushed in fine 
shape. The' first floor is erected and 
the walls are going up rapidly. Even 
now we can appreciate what a fine 
structure it will be when completed. 

C. P. Hammond, Ex-' 11 stopped 
at the college Friday and Saturday on 
his way to New York where he will 
join the Biltmore Forestry School and 
sail with them for six months study in 
Europe. Since leaving M. A. C. 
Hammond has studied in U. of Michi- i 
gan and U. of Maine. 

That the Mettawampe club is more 
popuiar this fall than at any time since 
its organization is evidenced each 
Saturday when a good number of fel- 
lows enjoy its treks. This last Satur- 
day a tramp was taken from Sunder- 
land over the river to Whately Glen 
and then to Hatfield and across the 
river by ferry and home through North 
Hadley. Fellows get the habit, you 
don't know how much you miss by 
not taking part in these tramps. 

The second meeting of students 
interested in establishing a literary 
monthly at M. A. C. was held Nov. 2. 
Ostrolenk presided and presented a 
report of the progress of the work. 
Louis Brandt was elected as an addi- 
tional member of the committee to 
investigate .the possibilities of organiz- 
ing a Lit. The committee was author- 
ized to bring the matter of establishing 
a Lit. before the student body at an 
early opportunity. 

C. J. Blanchard of the Government 
Reclamation Service gave a very inter- 
esting talk before the Stockbridge 
Club last Tuesday evening on the 
"Irrigation systems and the country 
they have opened up in the West. " 
He illustrated his talk with excellent 
lantern slides of the reclaimed land, 
and the opportunities now open in that 
region were made very evident. Mr. 
Blanchard gave a similar talk before 
the student-body at Assembly the fol- 
lowing day. 

The new game room, connected 
with the Social Union, in the base- 
ment of North College is fast nearing 
completion. It is attractively finished 
with buff colored walls and mission 
panelled wainscoting to the base of the 
windows. A maple floor will be laid 
this week and then the room wiil be 
ready for furnishings. Let us hoDe 
that these will be first class and that 
they wili receive first class care by the 
students. It is expected that two 
poo! tables and a billiard table will be 
installed. 

In an interview with the chairman 
of the Lit. committee, Professor Neal 
made the following statement with 
regards to the establishment of a 



WE'LL 




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IN THE 

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MANNER 



Our Repairing Department is well 
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EXPERT WORKMEN DO THE WORK 
OUR PRICES ARE MODERATE 
Bring your Shoes here for repairs and see how promptly, how well, 
and reasonably >' We'll Mend 'Km." This Shoe Store is always at the front 
with the best of Shoe Service in every line. 



JAMES F\ JPA.OK, 



Next to Post Office 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions rilled. 




FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <£ SHOE 
REPAIRING 



,AT 



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LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

LEVI NE 

11 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



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KODAKS 



THURBER'S 

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Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



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Be sure you get an 

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NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 




Is 





AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



There are seven good reasons 



why YOU should buy 



GOAL 



OF 



literary periodical. "For the general 
good of the college, it is desirable that 
literary interests should form a part of 
student life, and that literary activities 
should have such a stimulus as would 
come from the publication, by the stu- 
dents, of a literary periodical. Such 
a periodical is necessarily a matter of 
growth; but with the earnest support 
of the students and the alumni, we can 
reasonably expect to carry on a satis- 
factory literary publication, provided 
that expenses can be met. Personally 
I shall be glad to co-operate in the 
undertaking, if it is determined upon." 



C. R. ELDER 



l'olsom '10 Nickless 'io 

To Springfield Everybody 

Take Your Colors 
With Yoti~~#*~ 

ARM BANNERS 

20c each 



Aggie 
Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers ' 1 2 



An $s Pen 
For 1 Cent 

I will award a Pearl and Gold 
("rocker Pen to the person who 
can write legibly the greatest 
number of times on a postal 
card (using one side only) the 
following phrase: 

"THE CROCKER 
FOUNTAIN PEN." 
«« You Blow It To Fill It." For 
sale by E. E. Mlllett. 



All cards must be written 
in ink and must contain the 
name of the contestant. 

Contest closes Nov. 10, '09. 

Send all cards to 

E. E. MILLETT, 

Amherst, Mass 



TRACK ASSOCIATION. 

The management regrets that it is 
not enabled to announce a fixed sched- 
ule at the present time for this season's 
track work. Such a schedule will be 
announced at the earliest possible date. 
The relay team will run again this 
year against W. P. I. at the B. A. A. 
meet in Boston. Entrance for the 
team is now pending, and pretty well 
assured of, at meets to be held in 
Hartford. Conn., Troy, N. Y. and New 
York city in the months of February 
and March; dates as yet unannounced. 
Communication is now being carried 
on with several colleges in view of hold- 
ing a dual meet here at college and 
of entering another dual meet else- 
where, such meets to come in March. 
As intimated above the relay team will 
constitute a good part of the track 
work and will be our chief representa- 
tive feature in all meets. Opportunity 
will be offered however for work in the 
shorter track distances, high jump and 
shot put (16 lbs.). It is seriously hoped 
that material may develop along these 
latter lines of proficiency such as to 
justify some entries in the above men- 
tion meets. 

It will be the aim of the manage- 
ment to run a clean, energetic and in- 
teresting season endeavoring thereby 
to bring forward this wholesome sport 
as much as possible and to make good 
its place in M. A. C. athletics. The 
scope of activity will be widened as al- 
lowed by financial limitations and as 
justified by student enthusiasm. In 
pursuance of this policy five beautiful 
medals were secured and will be 
awarded to the first five place men in 
inter-class cross-county run to-morrow. 
It might be advisable to hold across 
county meet with another college, as 
contemplated this year. Such a move 
will be largely dependent upon the 
general interest taken in to-morrow's 
race. 

The track will be up directly after 
| the Thanksgiving recess and there will 
; probably be one or two cut downs in 
the squad before Xmas. There will 
\ be a chance for many : ail plan to come 
I out. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 

one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



A cook can take butter. Hour, sags* and eggs «■£ ■*£• ■ c 'J. k ,f' 
delicious or otherwise, depending upon her sMlf/and the receipt. She 
?,Tnomemlxe. but not manufacturer, «w the butter, sugar and Bow 
■he uses an- manufactured product*. ... 1 

farmer can take tankage, bone phosphates and potash «lUand 
-ike a fertiliser, effective or otherwise, depending spon 

' ' , •• ;..i„ u» -iiv, .!>. :i Imiiu* mixer 



m 



riwisi - , uckiiuhi| hvvh iorinui.i Mini 

lie also is a home mixer but likewise 



the State "f his raw materials. 

, s not ■ manufacturer. ... ( r u_. 

A part of the manufai turlns. has been done for i»m. 

To say nothing of his inability to combine Ins materials under con- 
ditions that will make them available for plants, the question whether 
hU^aw^lngredlenttaregoodorbadrertsoa the reputation of the 

m ' l "\Vhileit r is true that manufacturers of "raw" materials have to sell 

■obiec o state Inspection, as a rule they are remote sad generally on- 
Cwn to th?usuer?while manufacturers of mixed fertitiiers are well 
known and can be easily located at anytime. . 

Which is best for the farmer' Home mixing or purchasing m.xed 

fertil/ei 

Study the plant food problem 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylun\ arid High Streets, 



Hartford, Coi\r\. 



from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 
and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 
direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

. ,. Wai.tkr S. Garde. 

Banquets a specialty. 



Coach Yost plans to work his Mich- 
igan squad three hours a day for the 
rest of the season. Most of the prac- 
tice is being conducted by artificial 
I light. 



C*rp*ivtcr & Morehouse, 
PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 9, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tnesday, November, 9, 1909- 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL 



Ul 



If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. ... 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... 

Rain Cloth, - $3.50 per yd. Trouserings, • $350 per yard. 

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ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 



ntb a full line of College Supplies 



may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
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LOWKR EXPENSES Enable us 
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AMHERST FURNITURE 

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CARPET ROOMS 



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25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

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6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3d. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

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Selling price list. 



M. D. GILMAN. C. A. MOFFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

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Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

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Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST., Boston. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



WESTERN AGRICULTURE 

[Continued from first pago.] 

Pictures were then shown of the 
great natural resources of the west and 
the agricultural and engineering works 
that are being accomplished there. 
Mountains rich in minerals, streams 
with great water power, the desert that 
awaits only water in order to blossom 
forth, old forests, canons, beautiful 
lakes and land-scapes, hundreds of 
miles of canals, rivers made to run 
through mountains, dams as high as 
the national capitol; all these are but 
part of the conditions that will make a 
new agriculture and develop a new 
system of morals. In the districts 
where irrigation has already entered 
the land has increased enormously in 
value, ten acres will support a family 
and many farmers own automobiles. 
The perpetual sunshine and the great 
expanse make life a great deal broader 
and happier. 

MR. J. E. TOWER SPEAKS 

On Friday evening last, at Clark 
Hall, J. E. Tower who edits "Good 
Housekeeping" spoke informally on 
"Magazines and Magazine Making." 
Mr. Tower is a graduate of Amherst 
college and of national reputation as a 
journalist, magazine writer and editor. 
His was the first of a series of talks 
on literary themes which are to be 
given fjom time to time by men promi- 
nent in literary lines of work. 

Mr. Tower touched on a few of the 
primary principles and practices 
involved in the editing of a monthly. 
The managing staff of the monthly is 
composed of three separate heads; 
the advertising manager who is usually 
established in much luxury on the 
street floor of the monthly's quarters, 
and whose best stock in trade is oratory 
and affability; the circulation manager 
who is located further from the street 
and in less luxury; and, lastly, the 
editorial manager who wears no glossy 
raiment or affable smiles; who uses 
few words and labors in his shirt 
sleeves with ink on his fingers. 

The monthly prospers financially, 
not through its subscriptions but 
through its advertising columns. This 
explains why sonany magazines come 
into existence during periods of pros- 
perity and why so many cease to exist 
during periods of financial stress. 
That the monthly exists at all is due 
to the fact that it offers the public 
reading matter which, in quality and 
purpose, is distinctly unlike that 
afforded by those mighty organs of 
news — the daily papers. For the 
monthly handles contemporary history 
without abridgment, in the sequence 
of its events and in prospective. 

Mr. Tower stated that the supply of 
young men of literary qualifications 
falls far short of the demand and that, 
everywhere, journalists and editors 
are on the lookout to secure the ser- 
vices of young men — particularly col- 
lege men— who possess literary and 
business ability. 




m)[sTl_ 



1 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

" THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



•s»E. N. PARISEAU.^t 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 

Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



H. WARREN 
<£ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 




THOl^ON 

SPORTING GOODS 

STORE 
and REPAIR SHOP. 

Rear First Nat. Hank. 



TYPEWRITERS 



For Sale or Rent. 



Y . M. v/» A. 

Prof. F. B. McKay last Thursday 
evening addressed the Y. M. C. A. 
meeting on "Profitable Christianity." 
He said— "In the parables of the 
Talents, of Lazarus and Dives, and 
of the Judgement Day, we see the 
unprofitable servant, Dives, and the 
goats punished, not for what evil they 
did— they may have been good people 
—but for the good that they did not 
do. Our lives are too neutral, we 
should do something positive. The 
Golden Rule of Confucianism was, 
•Do not to others what you would not 
have them do to you,' making religion 
a purely negative thing. Christianity 
goes farther, it makes religion positive. 
Christianity's Golden Rule is 'Do to 
others what you would have them do 
to you, ' thus putting an obligation upon 
us to do something. 

This is an age of commercialism. 
But by 'profitable Christianity' I do not 
mean profitable from a business man's 
point of view, but in point of service 
to others. Despite old maxims, the 
honest are not always rich, the good 
are not always happy, but in a religion 
of service there is profit." 



T. Iv. PAH5B 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 
Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



TENNIS GOODS 



FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 



GUNS and AMMUNITION 



HOCKEY SKATES and 



STICKS 



SNOW SHOES and 



SKIS. 






THE FLORICULTURAL 
EXHIBIT 

French Hall last Friday evening was 
the scene of a very attractive and 
pretty exhibit of florlcultural decora- 
tions. There was a competition in 
table decorations among the members 
of the floricultural classes. There 
were ten tables on view. The table of 
H. F. Willard and W. Green took the 
first prize, twelve dollars in cash. The 
decorations of this table were extremely 
simple, a large vase of Nellie Pockett 
Japanese chrysanthemums being in the 
center, and the corners tastefully set I 
off with sprigs of fine ferns and large 
daisy type chrysanthemums. The 
second prize, a copy of Scott's ''Man- 
ual of Floriculture" and a five years' 
subscription to Horticulture went 
to I. W. Davis and E. M. Brown, 
whose simple table decorations con- 
sisted of a large oval bank of smilax 
and Major Bonnafor chrysanthmums. 
The judges of the contest were Asa 
Kinney, M. A. C. '96, floriculturalist 
at Mt. Holyoke College, J. W. Field, 
the Northampton florist and Mr. Can- 
ning, florist at Smith College. The 
tables for the evening were kindly 
furnished by E. D. Marsh of Amherst, 
the china by Charles Hall of Spring- 
field, and the silverware by the Ladies' 
Benevolent Society of the First Church, 
Amherst. 

The north west walls of the room 
were banked with ferns, palms, firs, 
rubber-plants, crysanthemums, roses, 
carnations, and violets, adding much to 
its appearance. During the exhibit 
the greenhouses adjoining French Hall 
>, were thrown open to the public. 



So met /ting for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Presscr, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 

All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Rent. 

Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Early and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $ 1.50. 
I Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wed d i ng Invitations and Calling Cards 



E. A. Thompson 



Minnesota offers a prize of $100 for WORKS, 17th STREET <£ 

the best football song submitted in a . 
competition. 



LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 9, 1909. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 




AMHERST. 



DARTMOUTH. 





. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUB STORE. 

COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Illock, Amukrst, Mass. 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 

E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

rmivr^viv rooms 

SFmlSmxiN.;. Te,eph ° ne 59 "'" WILLIAMS Block, Amhekst, M is*. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, BtoiaA.M"^Liip.M, 
plumbers. n . ~ — ~ _ . 

mimm ^^^^ mmmm m hther and Nitrous Oxide das admin- 

stered when desired 



GAS 



A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



BEST FA1 IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, hath room, 
hot and cold water; best farm in this 
section, running spring water; 40 acres 
tillage. 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber; plenty of fruit and many other good 
features. 56000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 



W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST. MASS. 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



COMMUNICATION. 

(Communications to the Signal concerning mat- 
ters of general Interest are welcomed. The Signal 
Is not to be held responsible for the opinions thus 
expressed.) 

Editor of The College Sicnal: — 

The editor of the Signal in an edi 
torial in last week's issue voiced three 
objections to the establishment of a 
Lit. at M. A. C. First, he doubts the 
literary equipment of M. A. C. men 
to publish a creditable Lit. ; second, he 
apprehends disastrous results for the 
Signal when a rival paper will appear 
and third, he predicts certain failure 
tor the business management of the 
Lit Permit me to discuss these 
notions in detail. 

The charge that M. A. C. students 
are not sufficiently equipped to publish 
a credible Lit. because M. A. C. is 
not essentially a college for the pur- 
pose of training strong periodical 
writers, is absurd and is hardly worthy 
of. further discussion. The editorial 
further bemoans the fact that no con- 
tributions to the Sicnal are forthcom- 
ing from the students except from com- 
petitors, and hence presupposes that 
none will be forthcoming for the Lit. 
Human nature is such that only a 
neligable number of persons will take 
notes during a baseball game and then 
write them up, merely for doing the 
work involved. A certain amount of 
reward in the form of hopes for an 
editorship or the distinction of having 
their names attached to the article is 
necessary to act as Incentive. The 
competition for places on the Signal 
board has always been lively, while 
other inducements have never been 
offered. In a recent interview, 
Professor Neale made a statement 
with regards to the establishment of a 
Lit., part of which reads as follows : 
"Such a periodical is necessarily a 
matter of growth ; but with the earnest 
support of the students and alumni, we 
can reasonably expect to carry on a 
literary publication, provided that 
expenses can be met." Apparently, 
Professor Neale, who is the best 
equipped man in college to judge the 
literary talents of the students, is nt 
troubled about their ability to publish 
a credible Lit. 

As to the implied objection that the 
establishment of a Lit. will infringe on 
the finances of the Signal, the writer 
takes the liberty to quote E. F. Da- 
mon, business manager of the Signal: 
"The frequency with which the Signal 
! is issued, the length of its establish- 
! ment and the nature of its reading 
j matter make it immune from any 
! financial trespassing of a possible Lit. " 

We are now ready to dissect the 
third point, that "the business man- 
agement of the Lit. is doomed to cer- 
tain failure." It must be admitted 
; that the business organization of the 
Lit. is its most difficult problem. Yet 
its solution is not impossible. It is 
here where loyal M. A. C. men will 
have an opportunity to display genuine 
college spirit. The establishment of 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 9, 1909. 



a Lit. requires money. There usually 
is extreme reluctance on the part of 
merchants to advertise in a new paper; 
hence the Lit. must depend entirely on 
subscriptions to start it off. If the 
student body decides to support a Lit., 
enough money can be raised from 
subscribers to issue a modest sized 
magazine the first year. The suc- 
ceeding years will be easier traveling. 

In summing up, it will be seen that 
an analysis of the editorial reveals its 
first assertion without any foundation, 
its fear for the Signal without basis 
and its prophecy about the finances of 
the Lit. of dubitable inspiration. 

(Signed) Bernard Ostrolenk, 



CHAS. W. BIRTWELL SPEAKS 

[Continued from first page.] 



viewing matters in a different light ; 
instead of sending children to reforma- 
tories they send them to our main 
office in the center of Boston. Hospi- 
tals also are in the movement ; school 
nurses, doctors, and truant officers 
are tryin? to bring happiness to thous- 
ands of children. Our society deals 
with about fifteen hundred children 
every year, finding places for the home- 
less, looking after those on probation, 
encouraging the enterprising and gen- 
erally bettering their condition, hu- 
man, personal ind wise charity. We 
are establishirg branches in not only 
large but in the smaller cities; here Is 
a supreme worK awaiting every one of 
you and for the sake of humanity you 
should undertake it. The movement 
is spreading — get into it. Better con- 
ditions in your town or city, remove the 
plague spots and cleanse the slums; 
promote the business, social and ath- 
letic movements in your home town. 
That is the attitude of mind that we 
would have seize upon the graduates 
of not only our academic but also our 
agricultural colleges. And here let 
me say that the most important thing 
we possess is not wealth or property 
but our attitude toward the life that we 
have got to live. The administration 
of yourself is the greatest undertaking. 
Look ahead and don't stumble selfishly 
along; look within and appreciate 
; moral things. President Lowell of 
I Harvard said, 'Boys, when you do 
things, think whether they would have 
the approval of your mother or sister.' 
Take the unselfish view, remembering 
that selfishness and carelessness bring 
on more misery than anything else. 
Be public spirited enough to do things 
that are worth while ; you'll find oppor- 
tunities enough. Learn to take life in 
a responsible way and you'll be the 
: happier for it." 

'00.— A recent number of the 
American Miller contained a short arti- 
cle on the importance of chemistry and 
capable chemists in relation to the 
interpretation of the pure food laws and 
the food producing industries of the 
j world. This furnished introduction to 
! a brief and flattering sketch of James 
W. Kellogg. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



MASSACHUSETTS AGGIES. 

ATTENTION!!! 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysantheinums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office Id French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



The occasion:— The 24th Annua! 
Reunion of the M. A. C. Club of New 

York. 

The place : -Hotel St. Denis, Broad- 
way and 1 1th street. 

The day and hour:— Friday, De- 
cember 3rd, at seven in the evening. 
Toastmaster :— Alfred William Lub- 
lin, '84. 

President Butterfield will deliver the | 
formal address on what wonders have 
been wrought and — the future of The 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

The reunion will then be thrown 
open to infoimal discussion and the 
days on the old Campus are to be 
lived again, while the soul of Levi 
Stockbridge gjes marching on. The 
hour noted above, means that the 
Grand March to the banquet room will 
start at 7-15 p. m. ; therefore, come 
early for registration and ante-prandial 
fellowship. We desire to hear from 
you, whether attendance is possible or 
not, to keep your names correctly in 
our card index mailing list; a final re- 
minder will be sent to those so indica- 
ting; dinner tickets, three dollars: 
seating at table arranged as per returns. 
By order of the Executive Committee ; 
John A. Cutter, M. D., 
'82, Secretary, 
251 West Eighty-first street, New York. 

Phone: Riverside 9775. 
November I, 1909. 

DEPARTMENT NOTES 

A few new desks and chairs have 
been ordered to accommodate the 
classes in entomology. 

Last month the experiment station 
issued a circular giving the results of 
its fertilizer experiments on orchard 
trees. 

The Horticultural department exhib- 
ited vegetables at the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Show held in Boston 
Nov. 4-7. 

ENGLISH. 

Members of the class in journalism 
are now preparing the first issues of 
the class magazines. Three periodi- 
cals will be published. The agricu 
tural paper is under the charge of 
Ralph A. Waldron for the first two 
issues. It will consist of 36 type- j 
written pages, and is being brought out ; 
in three "forms" of 12 pages each.; 
Two distinct editorial boards will bring 
OOt the other two periodicals ; Louis 
Brant and Henry A. Brooks are the 
edttOfS in charge. Each of these peri- 
odicals will consist of 48 pages, made 
up of three 16-page forms. 

The editors of the periodicals pub- 
lished by the jounalism class have the 
privilege of publishing any of the soph- 
omore themes that prove acceptable. 

POMOLOGY. 

Correction. The Owen farm has 
not been purchased as appeared in the 
last issue of the Signal. This farm 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



THOMAS 



PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 

SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



At the Grr.tt Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass.. 

October 18-24, 1909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, ( Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
Pint Premiums, Two Second Premiums, hour 

Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by MIL 
GEORGE A DrEW.oI Connecticut. M. \. C, Class 

of 1897. (Our pamphlet " Up To Date Fruit Grow- 
ing" is sent free if you mention The College Signal) 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

We also distribute from Host...., Mass., Ildfast. Me., Haltimore, 
M.I., WilmtagtOB, N.C, Savannah, <ia„ and ( l.arleston, S.C . 



FATI M A TOSS" 

£ JHL1 1 1 T 1 J^L CMARKT.TKS 

20 for 15 c*s. t> 




Senior Prom. Pretty 
girls. Brilliant colors. In- 
termission. Then a Fatima 
Cigarette. 




Its fine flavor 
pleases you. 
The soft blend of the mild Turkish 
tobacco fascinates. 

Instead of a fancy box you get ten 
extra cigarettes. 

THE AMERICAN TORACCO CO. 



»' 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 9, 1909. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 
Money to continue your College 
Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form oj Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. "MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving (1. Darts, . tgeni I,.' North 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



has been leased for a period of five 
years. All the trees have been 
assigned to members of the Junior 
class In Practical Pomology. These 
trees will be cared for by this class \ 
pruning and spraying will be done by 
these students. 

Nearly all the old peach fillers are 
being removed from the apple orchard 
and young trees will be set to take 
their places in the spring. 

FLORICULTURE. 

Two orchids, Cattleya Skinneri and 
Cattelya Leopoldii crossed on Laelia 
crispa, have recently been given to the 
department by E. 0. Orpet, of South 
Lancaster. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

'83.— Prof. F. A. Bishop, Arnold 
Mills, R. I. 

'00.— Dr. A. W. Morrill, now en- 
tomologist of the Arizona Horticultural 
Commission and experiment station has 
returned to Phoenix after an extended 
trip through the citrus belt of California. 
He is senior author of Circular 1 1 1 on 
fumigation recently published by the 
Bureau of Entomology. 

'02. — Born, November 1st., in 
Morgantown, W. Va., a daughter to 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Dac>. 

'08.— Born on Aug. 25, 1909, a 
son to Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cum- 
mings, 329 Center St., Chicago, 111. 

'08.— Charles F. Allen, Special 
Agent, U. S. Irrigation Commission, 
now traveling in the Mississippi states 
investigating social and economic con- 
ditions of immigrants. 

'09.— H.D.Phelps is at Milwaukee, 
Wise, planting a private place. He 
will soon be in Chicago where he is 
engaged with A. Phelps Wyman, land- 
scape architect. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Growth in attendance 1904 — 1909 
For the past five years the growth in attendance has been 
a steady one. The following statistics represent this growth 
both in Numbers and Percentage- 



Enrolment of Students 
of College grade 



Increase over previous year. 
In numbers 



1 904-05 I 98 

I905-06 2 14 16 

I906-07 2 28 14 

I9O7-08 252 24 

I908-O9 289 37 

I9O9-IO 350 6l 

Total increase in numbers 152 
Total increase in percent 76.6 



In percent. 

(approximate) 



8 

6-5 
10 

14.7 

21. 1 



The College Senate, 
Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Debating Club, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

R. H. Allen, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Manager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 

H. W. French, President 

H. J. Baker, President 



Eleven Index, 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON &> CUTLER 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

HKST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rates 



AMHERST SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO, 



THEATER BOOKINGS 



Nov. 10. 



12. 



20, 



29, 



30. 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

Matinee only, Kitty Cheat- 
ham Concert. 

"The House of a Thousand 
Candles. 

Matinee and night, Loie 
Fuller and Company. 

"The Servant in the 
House." 

•'The Third Degree." 



WANTED— One '08 Index, in good con- 
dition, to complete set. If an extra copy of 
the issue is at hand please communicate 
with Roger S. Eddy, 116 Pleasant St., 
Amherst. 



SPECIAL ALUMNI NUMBER 

THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol.. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 16, 1909. 



FARMERS AMONG M. A. C. 
ALUMNI 



THE FRATERNITY QUESTION AT M. A. C 



No. 9 

ALUMNI DOINGS AT COM 
MENCEMENT iqoq 

On July 15, 1874 a small company 
of M. A. C. alumni gathered and formally 



'91. 

01 lVl./\.^.<*iuniiu k»»'v».- -■■- j 

Henry M. Howard was born in H0USING F THE UNDER- 1 DOES THE FRATERNITY HELP |zed lhe Ass0C iale Alumni of the 

Franklin In 1 86B. In 1887 heentered GRADUATE THE STUDENT? Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

How A ard C beg g a r n d h,s".i.e Lun'a Zl The most important prob.em before This is ,„ reply ,o a tot* asking for For rh.r.y.four consecutive commence^ 

" ay and ,o T even m nths after President Butterfield and the trustees, I further hgh, on a remark made by me ments this assoc atton as m a 

„si v«iy anu tut «""' .. >u. r„iu« Mink, etiniwr a uoat son. irancart«t4 what b'isiness has seemea 



graduation he was a farm laborer, is the housing of the increased attend- 
He was always interested in market ance at our Alma Mater, involving the 
gardening and in 1892 formed a part- consideration of boarding houses, dor- 
nership with A. B. Davenport and was mitories and fraternity chapter houses, 
engaged for four years in market 1 lived for four years in our dorml- 
gardening in Watertown. For one tories, three years in Albany boarding 
year he was foreman of a large market houses while studying medicine, and 
gardening farm in Arlington. This in the last decade, because of deaths 
gave him excellent training for his life breaking up my home, three years in a 
work, and he was splendidly prepared fraternity chapter house in this city; 
for the development of his present strictly, as a fraternity man, 1 was 
farm. In 1896 he purchased a tract initiated in the fall of my freshman 
of land not far from the Ellis farm in year and enjoyed for four years its dis 

West Newton. 

14 1-2 acres, of which ten are tillable, secret hall; I have also served for 
In addition he rents eight acres in the nineteen years as a grand officer, have 
vicinity of his home. He produces a atone inducted new chapters, and also 
large line of garden vegetables of suspended them; and with my judicial 
which lettuce, spinach and radishes associates have disciplined and ex- 
are perhaps the most prominent, pelled members ; have helped those in 
occupying at least more space than trouble and been helped and have done 
incur...; .^..-u.-o. many things more effectively than if 

In 1906 Mr. Howard built one alone, because of the organization 
greenhouse for winter vegetables, back of me; the good and the evil In- 
This house is 220 feet long by 40 feet herent In all human institutions, I un 
wide. Since then he has built three derstand in 



at the Col'ege Night supper a year ago. transacted what b'isiness has seemed 
The letter insinuates that 1 am on the expedient. Many subjects have been 
"dark" side of the Fraternity question, thoroughly discussed and thrashed out, 
This is not exactly true; while believ- recommendations made for the bene- 
ing that the Fraternities in College do fit of the college and a number of dis- 
as much harm as good, I do not re- tinct and important projects particu- 
gard myself as an opponent to the Fra- larly furthered by this association, 
ternlty situation as it is today so much One project in particular should be 
as to the situation as it will be soon if mentioned here in referring to the first 
new Fraternities continue to be or- work of the association. At the ninth 
ganized and the old Fraternities hold annual meeting in 1883 a committee 
fast to their plans of building lodge of three was appointed as a Library 
houses and even succeed In doing so. committee to secure books and sub- 



long as they remain in the background same books, to be known as me 
and do not make themselves prominent "Alumni Library for the use of the 
in College Life. I was moved to Students of the College. 1 ' Tne fol- 
speak on the question that particular lowing year there was an add.tion of 
night because it was the night of the two to the committee of those 
opening of the College Union, and the appointed at the previous meeting, one 
week of the organization of a new Fra- of these being H. H. Goodell. The 
ternlty, two Institutions which are records of the Association show the 
directly opposed to each other. One results of this committee's work: 
works for a unified college and the Starting in June 25, 1885 with $15. 15 

other works for a unified body within there had been collected from and 
human institutions, i un- otner worKS ior a uumcu u uj , ria , nf i. «aqr ?S 

my own fraternity; the the college, which works against throug a lumn, ; nd ne s 6* 25 



sash houses, two of which are 150 latter are curable by good manage- 
feet long by 15 feet wide, the third ment and co-operation with Faculties, 
being 150 feet long by 28 feet wide. Despite the fact that good boarding 
In these houses he grows violets dur- houses occasionally exist, all boarding 
ing the winter months. He raises a houses are to be mentioned here only 
great deal of true* under glass, having to be condemned, 
about five hundred sashes. The The cause of fraternity house build- 
sashes are placed on frames during Ing was the gross neglect of students 
part of the winter, forming the well- by trustee bodies as to proper dormi- 
known sash houses common in the tory housing. The luxury of fraternity 
vicinity of Boston. In the spring they houses is due to the competitive spirit 
are placed over hotbeds, thus serving of pride, glaringly present in American 
a double purpose. life; in two colleges not many miles 

The feature of Mr. Howard's busi- from M. A. C. the fraternity houses 
ness is the attention he pays to devel- represent an investment of over a mil- 
oping the local trade. About ninety- lion dollars. 

five per cent of the vegetables are sold The real purpose of a general fra- 
to the market men in the suburban ternity initiating men in the freshman 
towns in his vicinity. Very few of the year is to discipline them. The sys- 
gardeners pay any attention to the tern that obtains in Yale College pro- 
local trade and Mr. Howard has found per means the ultimate election by the 
the neglected region around Boston a senior societies of really the best men, 
very profitable field for extending his and when such are not elected the 
sa i es> college body is heard from ; moreover 

Mr. Howard has paid special atten- at Sheffield, in Yale, the dormitories 
tion to the keeping of farm accounts for the fraternities are erected only by 
and has probably developed a better permission of the Yale corporate body 
system of these accounts than one and the men do not eat in such, but in 
farmer in a thousand. He is a very the commons, to promote university 
successful lecturer before granges, solidarity ; further, said Sheffield fra- 
market gardeners and various organi- ternity dormitories are under the close 
zations of a similar nature and is much scrutiny of Dr. Chittenden, the Di- 



other unified bodies, creating internal by June 22, 1886. and practically this 
dissentions, unhealthy rivalry and amount had been expended for the Col- 
jealousy, and leading to a dabbling in lege library. The only other report of 
politics in class and college elections, this committee available is in brief as 
The College Union seemed so good follows, report given June 21st, 1887 : 
to us that we dislike anything that in- Receive d from Alumni during year $1147.85 
terferes with the perfect working of its Expended for books $36500 
plans. The social room is a place Placed in permanent fund 782.85 
H .. „ „ „, piedeed but not collected 923.00 
where every M. A. C. man may go at ™a& a u $ n 47.85 

any time and meet on equal footing signed by H H GooDELL . 

everv other M. A. C. man; one fra- . 

every i Such a piece of work certainly is a 

ternity lodge^room where the student => ucn a ^^ , ... 

lenmy 'uu^r monument to the work of the 

meets his fellow students in a fraternal "ving monum- 

ti a r m.n nnt«f S C a umni association. There are others, 
wav as M. A. C men, not asu. o. ^>. , 

TrD G. K.men. I, Is a place to but space does no, here perm ah - 

tnru of the work wh ch has been done, 
assemble and by dai y contact to grow t0I 7 0I ine wor * w " * 
assemme ana oy u* y b commencement marked 

together, a place to develop College 



[Continued on page 8.] 



[Continued on pace 10.] 



ogetner. a pi^c i« -»*-«* ™»- f h Ass0 . 

spirit. College pride, CoUege loyalty, *• 3M .annual g ^ 

which comes with the right association c ate Alum o ^ 

with our fellow students. What the alumni register „. thatt i m -. 

, t ,Lo 146 alumni at the College at that time, 

rolleee Union s panning to do for the ii *° ■*'"»"" * l * 

whe student body .he Fraternity tries a "umber w.thin eight of tha, regtstered 
,„ do for its members ; but the Frater. » 1907, the banner year 
n-,y developes a Fraternity spirit, pride A report of he work of the Asso- 
nny Qcvciuh" y r Alumni wi g ve to you who have 

and lovaltv which grows more promi- c,aie * lumm w * » 

ana loyany, 6 r d |ts meetingS) an 

nent and noticeable as the Fraternities Dee " u '"* u „..«— ic 

nem «*nu ■.« k h asso ciation is 

m-ow stronger and more numerous. iaea Ul < usl l . 

grow stronger a..u wnQ are 

And it is this Fratern ty spirit which aoin K- n wm } 

And it 3 v members, the opportunity 

nromnts everv man to vote for his ""' 

prompts every mai through this organization, to 

Fraternity brother n every election, inere ■» ll " uu s ■ ■ 

rraiernuy uiumc , Ilir ther the interests of the college both 

whether his brother is best fitted for turtner tne inier^i * 

wnetner ma u directly and indirectly and perhaps, in 

the position or not. It is the same airetuy 

- [Continued on p.f^.1 1Con,lnued " ^ 6l 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 16, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 16, .90c 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. 
HENRY A. BROOKS 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 191 1. 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Asst. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 

, College Notes. 



SIGNAL OFFICB HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. m. 

Tuesday. Thursday and Fridays from b-30, 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday . 6-30 to 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 P. M. 
Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 m. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNriAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 1911, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 

copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 

E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Off'ce. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY, NOV. 16. No. 9 



ALUMNI RECORDS 

Last August, blanks were sent to all 
M. A. C. alumni with the request that 
they furnish certain personal statistics 
for records to be filed in the office of 
the president of the College. The 
manner in which the alumni have 
responded to this request has been 
extremely gratifying ; at present over 
80^ of the alumni, whose addresses 
are known, have returned iheii blank*. 

Some data of like character had 
already been collected at the presi- 
dent's office; they were, however, 
neither complete, up-to-date, nor posi- 
tively authentic. For four or five 
years practically no work had been 
done on the records ; accordingly, the 
addresses of several alumni have been 
lost track of, and at present it is 
impossible for the College offcers to 
reach these graduates by letter. This 
is indeed an unfortunate condition of 
affairs both from the standpoint of the 
College. whose officers or students often 
wish to communicate with the entire 
graduate body, and from the standpoint 
of the alumni themselves, who from 
time to time may desire to get in touch 
with some individual alumnus, or with 
the members of their class. 

Under the circumstances, it seemed 
wise lo start anew in the attempt to 
revise and perfect the alumni records 
and addresses, to institute an aggres- 
sive campaign with the alumni and 
former students, to interest them in 
this general plan, and to appeal to 
them for their individual support of the 
work. 

The value of such statistics as are 
being collected, merely as a matter of 
record, and their importance in aiding 
to keep a college in a proper and close 
touch with its alumni, are obvious and 
have been demonstrated by older and 
larger institutions than ours. More- 
over, the College authorities and others 



often wish to determine to what extent 
M. A. C. alumni are entering into the 
various vocations for which they are 
fitted here; such for instance as what 
percentage of the graduates areenaged 
in farming, scientific agriculture, busi- 
ness, the professions, etc. It seems 
right that such information should be 
available, and it can become so only 
as the individual alumnus makes it so 
by co-operating in some such way 
as is suggested here. 

It is intended that the statistics thus 
obtained shall be carefully recorded and 
placed en permanent file to be availa- 
ble to the college officers; this file will 
also be open to the editors of the Index 
or Signal, to class secretaries, or to 
other persons having a legitimate 
use for the information. As soon as 
feasible, sn attempt will be made to 
collect similar data from non-gradu- 
ates, who, however, remained in col- 
lege for some considerable length of 
time. 

To be of the greatest value, it will 
be necessary to keep these records 
continuously up-to-date and accurate ; 
to insure that they will be kept so, the 
alumni obviously will need to send in 
as often as may be possible, notes 
concerning themselves or other alumni, 
which may properly be incorporated in 
the permanent records, or appear in 
the alumni columns of the Signal. 
It is especially requested that any 
change of occupation or address shall 
be reported promptly to the President's 
office ; such notes, unless accompanied 
by a request that they be considered 
confidential, will as far as practicable 
be published in the Signal 

Each year a return card will be sent 
out for the purpose of verifying the 
addresses of the alumni ; if these cards 
are returned promptly, it will make 
possible the accurate maintenance of 
the lists. 

We earnestly appeal to each 
alumnus to assist in this project in 
every way he can, especially by giving 
it his personal support, and by comply- 
ing with the requests for information 
which will be made to him from time 
to time. 

Any suggestions as to methods by 
which this work may be made easier 
or the results more beneficial, wili be 
gratefully received. 

Ralph J. Watts. 

THE FINANCES OF THE 
ASSOCIATION 

This is a disagreeable but eminently 
practical subject. To those in arrears 
we would simply state the fact that cut 
of 293 bills for dues sent out the first 
of October, but 65 have brought replies. 
Please remit to Sidney B. Haskell, 
secretary Associate Alumni, Amherst, 
Mass. Outside of the districts cov- 
ered by the New York clearing house, 
a money order is preferred to a check. 

If the Association is to do its work, 
the "sinews of war" must not be 
lacking. 



WE'LL 



WE DO 




\r*r i 



SHOE REPAIRING 

IN THE 

BEST POSSIBLE 
MANNER 



Our Repairing Department is well 
equipped with everything that's mod- 
ern in the way of Shoe Repairing 
Machinery. 

EXPERT WORKMEN DO THE WORK 
OUR PRICES ARE MODERATE 
Bring your Shoes here for repairs and see how promptly, how well, 
and reasonably " We'll Mend 'Km." This Shoe Store is always at the front 
with the best of Shoe Service in every line. 



jAivu^s f\ page, 



Next to Post Ofuck 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT d SHOE 
REPAIRING 

AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. 111. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 




LEVIN E 

11 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



THURBER'S 

NKXT-To -I'OMT-OKPICK 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



KODAKS 



AND 



ALBANY, 
N. Y. 



BROWNIES 

PHOTO GRAPHIC SU PPLIES 

Be sure you get an 

EAST/TAN FILH 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 




NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



Deuel's Drug Store 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



TRAINING SCHOOL WINS. 

There are seven good reasons inA1 - 



why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OK 



C. R. ELDER 



Folsom '10 



Nickless '10 



Aggie 
Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers ' 1 2 



Score 18 6. Desperate Fight to Finish, 

but Springfield Proves Superior. 

FIRST HALF. 

M. A. C. 

Rushes and returns of "kicks. 
Number of first downs made. 
9 V unts average distance. 
Penalties Inflicted. 
Held opponents for downs, 

s. t. s. 

Rushes and returns of kicks. 
Number of first downs made. 
3 punts, average distance. 
Penalties inflicted. 
Held opponents for downs, 

SECOND HALF. 

M. A. C 

Rushes and returns of kicks. 
Number of first downs made, 
6 punts, average distance. 
Penalties Inflicted, 

Held opponents for downs. 

s. t. s. 

Rushes and returns of kicks, 

Number of first downs made. 

6 punts, average distance, 

Penalties inflicted, 

Held oppnnents for downs, 



ih Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats .ind Mots and gOtM by 
jerks. 

'•DON'T KICK" if you B et 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine DroppCT. 
Get the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill It." 

(aiaranteed to give satisfac- 



tion. 



SOU) BY 



E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



AN APPEAL TO THE ALUMNI 

The Executive Committee of the 
Alumni Association are taking active 
steps, in accord with the Association 
vote of last June, to secure for pre- 
sentation to the college an oil portrait 
of Professor Goessmann. To this end 
they have appropriated already all of 
the available funds and yet the amount 
falls far short of what is required. On 
this account it is earnestly requested 
that all members of the Association 
pay their dues promptly. If the por- 
trait is to be secured without consid- 
erable delay, still further voluntary con- 
tributions will be required. These and 
the regular dues should be sent to 
Sidney B. Haskell, Secretary, M. A. 
C, Amherst, Mass. This is an 
opportunity to show our practical loy- 
alty to our Alma Mater and to aid in 
honoring, in life, one of our loved pro- 
fessors- the best years of whose life 
have been spent in the service of M. 
A. C. and the individual members of 
our Association. Let us one and all 
act now ! 

H. J. Wheeler, 
Chairman Portrait Committee. 



Springfield Training School realized 
its fondest hopes last Saturday by de- 
feating our team, 18 6. It was the 
most desperate struggle ever seen in 
5ipringfield. and Training School won 
because it had the better team. Our 
team was in poor shape ohysically. 
Blanty, Schemerhorn, Roberts, 
Moreau, Morse, Hubbard, and Powers 
were on the field hospital list. With 
these men in shape, the sccre might 
have been different. Springfield based 
ail their plays on McCulloch and Win- 
ters, who were powerful factors in the 
game. 

The first six points came in less than 
five mmut3s, when we lost the ball on 
I downs on our 8-yard line. Soon after 
1 Training School rushed the ball the 
\ length of the field, fumbled, and a 
kicking duel resulted. Schermerhorn 
blocked an onside kick and ran 62 
yards for a tie score, 6-6. Training 
School scored again by line bucks and 
a long run by Winters. Score, 12 6. 
In the second half, two of our drops 
failed. Training School scored by a 
long series of punts and rushes, after 
30 minutes of play. 

The feature was the gritty stand our 
team made. The work of Winters 
and Schermerhorn was prominent. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST (UNFITTING 

the country produce*. 

The Kail Styles are ready 
anil every price is a pleasing 

one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



For the Land's Sake." 



A cook can take butter, Hour, MgftT and Ml and make a cake, 

delicioui or otherwise, depending upon her rtUTaod the receipt She 

1. ,a home mixer but not manufacturer, for the butter, suf« and Hour 

sin- u^es are manofat im «■«! product*. , , 1. -...I 

\ farmer can take tankage, bone phosphates and potash salts and 

make a fertiliser, effective or otherwise, depending upon formula and 

"he state of his raw materials. He also is a home mixer but likewise 

is not a manufacturer. . 

A oart of the manufacturing has been done for mm. 

To sav nothing of his inability to combine his materials under con- 
ditions 'that will make them av.nlable tor plants, the question whether 

i'is W Ingredients are good or bad rests on the reputation of the 

'"'"'whileit'is true that manufactures of "raw" materials have to sell 
subject to state inspection, as a rule they are remote and generally un- 
known to the usue,. while manufacturers of mixed fertilisers are well 
known and can be easily located at anytime . 

Which is best fo, the fanner? Home mixing or purchasmj; mixed 

fei til/eis? 

Study the plant food problem 

FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



BOWKER 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Hulek, 1. e., 
Martin. 1. t • 
Delehanty, 1. g.. 
Gregory, c, 
Collings, r. g.. 
Yeager, r. t.. 
Winters, r. e., 
McCulloch, q. b., 
Hopkins. Schroeder. 

Courleux. Metzler, r. 
1. h. b 
Moller. f. b., 



r. t. 
r. g. 



M. A. C. 

r. e., O'Frien 

Schermerhorn 

Walker, Baker 

c, Hayden 

1. g.. Powers 

It. Leonard 

1. e.. Hubbard, Larson 

q. b., Morse, Gore 

1. h. b, 

r. h. b., Blaney, Kling 
h. b.. 

., Roberts. Goodnough 
f. b . Moreau, Ames 

Score: S. T. S. 18. M. A' C. 6. Touch- 
downs: Yeager 2. Hulex, Schermerhorn. 
Goals from touchdowns: McCulloch 3, 
Morse. Referee, Dorman of Cclumbia 
Umpire. Farmer of Dartmouth. Head lines- 
man, Fette of Oberlin. 35-minute halves. 



Wisconsin university undergraduates 
have taken a stand against hazing, fol- 
lowing the recent indefinite suspension 
of a Junior for participation in the 
hazing of a Freshman. 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum ai\d ^sh Streets, 



Hartford, Coi\r\. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

• ,, Wai.tkr S. Gari»k. 

Banquets a specialty. 




GOX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 






The College Signal, Tuesday, November 16, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 16, 1909- 



S 



WHAT ABOUT 



THAT FALL 



THE DIVISION OF SHORT Through the Division of Short Courses 

COURSES it is hoped to cooperate with the State 

For about thirty-five years after the Board of Agriculture, the Grange, the 

establishment of the Land Grant Col- 



I 



leges, the work of these institutions 



If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 

*, ,,,... ^ • * 1 n_!„ /-i_i.i_ divided itself mainly into teaching col- 



Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth 

Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Rain Cloth, $3-50 per yd. Trouserings, 



$12.50 

$11.50 

$10.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

$3.50 per yard. 



I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A. 



N 



P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

t£gT Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, 



lege students and carrying on experi- 
ment station work. As time went on, 
it became apparent to those who were 
directing the work of these colleges, 
that such institutions, supported by 



Boards of Trade, the schools, the 
country churches, the County Young 
Men's Christian Associations, and 
other agencies connected with rural 
life, in the carrying out of work which 
will mean much to Massachusetts in 
ihe future. In short, the chief object 
of the Division of Short Courses is to 



state and national funds, had a duty to make the Massachusetts Agricultural 

the man on the farm and to the boy College as useful to the people of the 

who could not come to the college for State as it is possible to make it. 
the regular four years' work, as well 



10. 



William D. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



M I). OILMAN. 

TELEPHONE 



C. A. MOKKKT. 
1079-3. 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
witb a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



IN 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



riOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to ill Main Street. 

Worcksi kr, Mass. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 



Before ordering 
Proms and other occasions 



your horses for 
call 



on 



25 different foreign Copper Coins socts. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 
$1.00 

" dates acts, pieces socts. 

" dates 3ct. pieces 5octs. 

" dates nickel cents ascts. 

" Broken Hank and Confederate 



25 

Bills $1.00 

Semi (or my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars and 
Selling price list. 



HERBERT 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST 



E. MOREY 



Boston. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 



as to those who could take advantage 
of these privileges. Realizing this, 
about twenty of these institutions have 
now organized departments with this 
third purpose in view. 

Those who administer the affairs of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, realizing that one of the great 
problems of New England agriculture 
is "to teach the farmer," voted to 
establish a "Division of Short 
Courses" which should be coordinate 

GILMAN and MOFFET, in s,andin g with ihe college, the ex 

^ mmm ^_^^ periment Station, and the Graduate 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers School. The organization and devel- 
opment of this division was begun 
Sept. I , of the present year. 

The Division is yet too young to 
give a full outline of what the work will 
be. For the present the work is 
organized as follows : A winter course 
of 10 weeks, In which 14 courses of 
instruction, covering the principal lines 
of agriculture, are offered by the pro- 
fessors in the different departments ; a 
short poultry course two weeks in 
length ; a bee keepers' course ; and 
a farmers' week, at which time it is 
hoped that a large number of farmers, 
who might not otherwise ever visit the 
College, will come and receive much 
valuable information. The summer 
school, which has been so popular, 
will be continued, new features being 
added and its scope gradually 
broadened. 

For those who cannot come to the 
College, even for the shortest of the 
courses mentioned above, two lines of 
work will be conducted. 

The lecture work of the members 
of the faculty, which has been carried 
on individually, has been organized 
under the name of ' ' Lecture Courses. ' ' 
The lectures are offered singly or in 
courses, to organizations desiring them. 
Many calls have come to the Col- 
lege for correspondence courses. Ten 
of these, covering the subjects of 
Soils, Fertilizers, Farm Crops, Dairy- 
ing, Animal Feeding, Farm Manage 
ment. Floriculture, Fruit Growing, 
Market Gardening, Agricultural Edu- 
cation, and Elementary Agriculture for 
Teachers, are now offered. 

The renewed interest in Agriculture 
throughout New England has brought 
demands on those engaged in the 
teaching work of the College and the 
research work of the Station, that 
could not be met without having their 
t regular work seriously interfered with, i 



Hurd, 
Director. 








A Gool> THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE S HO EM AN." 
Tel. 94-4 

S. S. HYDE 



F. H. WARREN 
<£ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Swarthmore's return to football has 
not any too great an amount 
thusiasm among 
freshman class 
record, but few 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
M ass. 



of 



en- 

the students. The 
is the biggest on 
of the newcomers 
have taken to tootball so far. 

The introduction of the tug of-war 
between the sophomore and freshman 
classes at Tufts instead of the old flag 
or chapel rushes will be the first time 
that this branch of athletics has been 
made use of in a general way, at the 
Medford college. In the annual gym- 
nastic competition in March for the 
last two years a tug- of- war has been 
; held, but with only a small number of 
men on a side. With the entire num- 
ber of men in the classes at each end 
of the rope some excitement should 
result, although the stirring features of 
the rushes will probably be lost. 



^E. N. PARISEAIU* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 




Carroll D. Wright 



CARROLL D. WRIGHT 

•CarroH B. -Wright was a member of 
our Board of Trustees for a period of 
three years. Prior to his appointment 
he had not been particularly familiar 
with the work of the College. During 
his incumbency, he visited the College 
only twice, 1 think. Yet I am sure 
that every member of the Board of 
Trustees would endorse the statement 
that he was one of the most useful of 
all the members on the Board. 

He had had long experience in deal- 
ing with men, in selecting advisors, in 
meeting difficult situations, and his 
duties as college president had brought 
him into close touch with the internal, 
concrete problems of college adminis- 
tration. Thus he was enabled to 
appreciate at a glance the advantages 
and disadvantages of proposed plans. 
He was alert and wise in passing judg- 
ment upon candidates for important 
positions, and he brought to the con- 
sideration of all college questions rare 
good judgment and common sense. 

His committee service was wholly 
with the important committee on the 
Course of Study and Faculty, he was 
rarely absent from the frequent meet- 
ings of this committee, and his advice 
was always sought and welcomed. 
He had the most complete sympathy 
with the purposes and work of the Col- 
lege He was a devoted admirer of 
young men, always willing to help 
them and to overlook their foibles, 
anxious to stimulate the best there 
was in them. At the same time, he 
had the utmost scorn of anything that 



J was mean or dishonorable. Thus his 
sympathies were all on the side of- 
increasing the advantages open to stu- 
dents, and of giving them every pos- 
sible aid to make use of those 
advantages. 

Colonel Wright was a firm believer 
in the future growth of the college, and 
was one of the most outspoken mem- 
bers of the Trustees with reference to 
the necessity of their securing larger 
appropriations from the Legislature. 
He felt that the State of Massachu- 
setts has a large duty towards her 
sons, which can be fulfilled only by the 
development of an institution of the 
first rank along agricultural lines, and 
was always ready to lend his support 
to any business-like project for 
increased appropriations. 

Colonel Wright's genial personality, 
his exhaustless fund of anecdote, his 
native wit, and his shrewd judgment, 
made him at once the comrade of all 
those who came in contact with him. 
It was a great loss to the College 
when he passed away, and a misfor- 
tune that he could not have served for 
at least a number of years longer. 
Personally 1 feel his loss keenly, 
because of his ready sympathy, his 
clear-headed understanding, his cour- 
age, and his faith in our work. 1 was 
greatly impressed by his personality 
and character, and I think it is not out 
of place to repeat here a little poem 
which was read at his funeral, and 
which it is said was a favorite poem, 
—one that he carried with him, and 
read and re-read: 



"I like the man who faces what he must, 
With step triumphant and a heart of cheer: 
Who fights the daily battle without fear; 
Sees his hopes fail, yet keeps unfaltering 

trust 
That God is Cod. that somehow, true and 
just 
His plans work out for mortals; not a tear 
Is shed when fortune, which the world 

holds dear, 
Falls from his grasp; better, with love, a 
crust 
Than living in dishonor; envies not, 
Nor loses faith in man; but does his best, 
Nor ever murmurs at his humbler lot. 
But with a smile and words of hope, gives 
zest 
To every toiler; he alone is great, 
Who by a life heroic conquers fate." 

Kenyon L. Butterfield 

/THE NEW ATHLETIC FIELD 

1 have been asked, as Chairman of 
the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds of the Board of Trustees, to 
write briefly about the situation as 
regards the coming athletic field. 

It was a great disappointment to all 
of us that the House Committee on 
Ways and Means in the last Legisla- 
ture would not recommend the grant- 
ing of the $15,000 asked for by the 
College authorities for the purchase of 
land. They gave us only $5500. 
They thought that sum would enable 
us to buy the Kellogg Farm and 
that we could carve the necessary 
athletic field out of that property by 
making its longer line east and west. 
Now, everybody who knows anything 
about this subject understands the 
importance of having the longer line of 
the parallelogram north and south, not 
east and west. Besides, the nature 
of the soil on the west end of the Kel- 
logg Farm and the grade are practi- 
cally prohibitive of any such field. 
We should have to cut down the level 
near the street and raise the middle 
part near the brook to such an extent 
that the cost would be entirely dispro- 
portionate to the value of the land. 
The only possible field In that region is 
one, the back bone of which runs north 
and' south, in the vicinity of the pres- 
ent location of Lincoln Avenue. We 
therefore applied the $5500 to the pur- 
chase of several strategic parcels 



which, witl/the help we expect to get 
in the future from the Legislature, will 
enable us to have the field we want. 
We shali be insistent at all times, in 
season and out of season, that the 
need of an athletic field is the crying 
want of the College, and that other 
things ought to give way for it. We 
shall undoubtedly meet difficulties but 
the Trustees hope to overcome them 
with the united assistance of the 
Alumni, Students and Faculty. Suc- 
cess will involve sacrifice in certain 
directions, which we believe will be 
generously made. We shall have to 
rely largely upon the co-operation and 
active sympathy and support of such of 
the fraternities as own land, requisite 
for the field ; and some readjustment 
of roads and grounds will have to be 

made. 

It is very encouraging to note that 



thus far everybody concerned has 
shown a disposition to co-operate 
heartily and unselfishly in this move- 
ment. With the land secured through 
the aid of the State, the next appeal 
will have to be made to the Alumni to 
take the field and fit it up. The 
Trustees confidently expect the 
response from that body will be prompt 
and complete. We have an opportunity 
to secure one of the best athletic 
fields in the State, if the Legislature 
will co-operate, a field of which the 
students will be proud, and on which 
we believe they will win many future 
victories. The Boad of Trustees is a 
unite in its purpose to secure this field. 
Us desirability and necessity are not 
open questions. It is simply a matter 
of persuading the members of the Leg- 
islature of the necessity and reasona- 
bleness of our request. Every young 
man in College ought to feel that he is 
especially charged with the duty of see- 
ing and influencing every member of 
the Legislature with whom he is 
acquainted, in behalf of this pressing 
necessity. 

The Trustees felt that the key to 
the situation was the Keliogg farm. 
We need it because it will be required 
in the readjustment of roads and 
grounds; also because we must be in 
a position to make some exchanges of 
land with the fraternities which are 
ready to co-operate with us ; for that 
reason the Trustees individually as- 
sumed the purchase of the Kellogg 
farm and are holding it in trust for 
the College until such time as the Col- 
lege can take it off their hands at cost. 
It is confidently hoped that this coming 
! winter will see us clear of our difficul- 
ties so far as the purchase of an athletic 
field is concerned and th^t an enthus- 
iastic alumni movement, backed by 
the esprit du corps of the student body, 
will sweep us on, ere many months, to 
the possession of a property on which 
I many glorious M. A. C. victories will 
be won in the future. 

I want to add in closing that the 
I Trustees have noted, with much grati- 
fication, the spirit and pluck with 
which the M. A. C. athletic teams 
have held together under great dis- 
couragements and have continued to 
maintain an honorable place in all 
athletic contests. Let that be the 
continued spirit of the future. 

Marquis F. Dickinson, 
53 State St., Boston, Xou. 12, 1909. 



The ladies of the college have 
planned to entertain the students at 
the Drill Hall on Saturday evening, 
Nov. 20th, at 8 o'clock. Every stu- 
dent is urged to be present. The 
ladies desire to make these annual 
gatherings strictly informal and to use 
them for the purpose of bringing about 
a better acquaintance among the 
members of the college. 

The Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology won the annual Tech- Harvard 
cross country race on Friday afternoon. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 16, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November, 16, 1909. 



THE ASSOCIATE ALUMNI alumni doings at com- 
mencement 1909 



An Association of the graduates of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



OFFICERS. 



Dr. H. J. WHEELER, '83, 
Dr. J. B. PAIGE. '82. 
Judge R. W. LYMAN. 71, 
CHAS. O. FLAGG, '72, 
S. B. HASKELL. 04, 
DAVID BARRY, '90. 
E. A. WHITE, 95, 



President 

1st Vice President 

2d Vice President 

3d Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Auditor 



COMMITTEES. 



EXECUTIVE -Alove Officers. E. B. Holland 
92. H. F. Thomson '05. 

EDITORIAL- H. F. Thomson 05. E. A. 
White '95. R.J. Watts '07. 

CONSTITUTION — David Barry '90 A F 
Morse '92. S. B. Haskell 04. 

ALUMNI CO-OPERATION - J. B. Palee '82 
E. B. Holland "92. A. V. Osmun '03. 

GOESSMAN PORTRAIT- H. J. Wheeler '83, 
John E. Wilder '82. E. W. Allen '85, John A. 
Cutter 82, Frederick Tuckerman '78. 



As stated in another column, the 
publication of Alumni News has been 
suspended, and in its place is issued 
this "Special Alumni" number of the 
College Signal, to be followed at 
Intervals by others. This is being 
sent to all those members of the Asso- 
ciate Alumni whose addresses are 
known. 

The purpose of the Alumni News was 
to preserve in a convenient and per- 
manent form all historical matter 
relating to the college. The earlier 
secretaries of the Associate Alumni, 
when called upon to furnish informa- 
tion regarding the early development 
of the college, found that it was diffi- 
cult and almost impossible to obtain. 
Too much reliance had been placed 
upon memory, and too little upon the 
printed sheet. At the present time, 
however, the keeping of college 
records has been much systematized, 
and the scope of college publications 
widened. It has therefore been 
thought that the continued publication 
of the Alumni News would be a waste 
of effort and of money — hence its 
suspension. 

The editors have been somewhat 
puzzled as to just what should be the 
field of this special number. After 
much thought it was decided to 
attempt to develop it as an organ for 
the expression of alumni opinion 
regarding affairs of interest and im- 
portance to themselves and to the 
College. There are a number of pro- 
jects on foot which sooner or later will 
call for aid, financial and otherwise, 
from the graduates of M. A. C. 
Some which may be mentioned are 
the equipping of an athletic field, the 
building of fraternity houses, the sup- 
porting of the annual budget before the 
Legislature, etc. Freely and willingly 
should this aid be given ; but at the 
same time those called on should have 
opportunity for discussion, for sugges- 
tion, and for constructive criticism. 
By the co-operation of the Board of 
Editors of the Signal, representing the 
student body, is this opoortunity given, 
and it is hoped that the alumni witl 
avail themselves of it to the fullest 
extent. 

The next alumni issue will probably 
be in June. Contributions are invited. 



[Continued from first page.] 

this way, be an appeal for your mem- 
bership and co-operation. 

During the college year of 1908 
1909 the executive committee of the 
association met twice, once in Febru- 
ary and once in May, to transact the 
business referred to it at the preced- 
ing annual meeting and to get into 
shape suggestions for the work which 
seemed expedient that the association 
should take a part in, for the ensuing 
year. At this last meeting most of 
the propositions which took the atten- 
tion of the June meeting were carefully 
considered and amended. Some 
radical changes in the work of the asso- 
ciation have occurred, due to these 
recommendations, and it is well that 
these be here submitted to the general 
body of Alumni. They may be divided 
, into five classes : 

1. Alumni publications. 

2. Financial policy of the Association. 

3. Constitutional changes. 

4. Co-operation among alumni asso- 
ciations. 

5. The Trustee question. 

ALUMNI PUBLICATIONS. 

For the past few years the associate 
alumni have published annually the 
College and Alumni news, "containing 
College items of interest and alumni 
news." From year to year it became 
more difficult to secure material for 
the "Alumni News" that had rot al- 
ready been published in the "Collece 
Signal." In addition to this the work 
of publication has always rested with 
the Secretary of the Association, en- 
tailing upon him, a very heavy burden. 
The publication of the "alumni news" 
has been a source of considerable ex- 
pense each year, costing over $125 
to publish, no account being taken of 
the work of those who furnished the 
material, looked out for the planning, 
proof reading and mailing. The ques- 
tion arose, "Is such an expenditure 
warranted by the return we get and 
can we, the association, still retain a 
means of giving to the alumni through 
a publication, news of interest and 
value with a lessened expense ? " 
There seemed to be a way open for an 
improvement along this line and the 
association took the following action on 
this question : First, a committee of 
three was authorized to act as an edi- 
torial committee to assist the secretary 
in the preparation or alumni publica- 
tions. Second, it was voted that the 
Alumni News as heretofore published 
be superseded by two alumni issues of 
the College Signal, one in the fall 
and one at commencement, this action 
meeting with the approval of the Sig- 
nal Board. 

The advantages of these changes, 
briefly summed up, are : Means of 
communicating directly with the mem- 
bers of the association twice a year in- 
stead of once, much lessened expense 
in publication, less probab' ,y of dupli- 



cation of College Sicnal material 
and the lightening of the burden of 
work that has heretofore rested on the 
Secretary of the Association. 

THE FINANCIAL POLICY OF THE ASSO- 
CIATION. 

There has for years been an annual 
assessment of $ 1 levied on all mem- 
bers of the Associate Alumni. This 
has been used in the following ways : 
First, in supporting the Alumni News 
and second, in giving an annual ban- 
quet to those members of the associa- 
tion who returned at commencement 
and who had paid their association 
dues to date. These two items have 
necessitated the expenditure of practi- 
cally all the money received from the 
association, and neither have resulted 
in what may be called "permanent 
benefit" to the college or to the 
Alumni themselves. In June 1908 
the Alumni at their annual meeting 
passed the following resolution: "Re- 
solved : That it is the sense of the As- 
sociate Alumni, that the funds of this 
association should be used for some 
substamial purpose that will aid the 
College and mark our loyalty to our 
Alma Mater. In order that this may 
be accomplished, it is the sentiment 
of this association that the college 
authorities should hereafter furnish the 
annual dinner." 

Acting on this suggestion the college 
authorities furnished the Alumni Din- 
ner in 1909. The future policy of the 
College, in this particular, has not 
been definitely determined upon. If 
this is continued the annual expendi- 
ture of from $100 to $115 will be 
saved to the association. By chang- 
ing the method of handling the alumni 
publications a saving of from $50 to 
$75 annually will be brought about. 
As a result, the association is put into 
a position where some definite policy 
in regard to the use of its funds is de- 
manded, and. acting under the suppo- 
sition that the college will lake care of 
the alumni dinner in the future, the 
following policy was adopted: "The 
disposition of the funds of the Associa- 
tion shall be as follows: 1st, the 
money necessary shall be used to pay 
for the alumni share of the expense of 
publishing the Alumni Numbers of the 
College Signal and 2nd, all money 
in excess of this amount shall be used 
to provide a fund for the purchase of 
portraits of Dr. Goessmann and Pro- 
fessor Stockbridge, these portraits to 
be for presentation to the college. " 

CHANGES IN THE CONSTITUTION. 

The following vote was carried at 
the June meeting, namely, "that a 
committee be appointed to revise the 
constitution." The Alumni Associa- 
tion is now at such a period in its 
growth that certain definite policies for 
its work might well be outlined. 
Each year sees a material addition to 
the membership of the association and 
each year the interest in the College 
seems to be deepening, both for the 
old graduates and new. This associa- 



tion of alumni may be a considerable 
factor in the development of the Col- 
lege and it is with this general state of 
affairs in mind that the work of revision 
is undertaken. 

Specific changes were made in the 
constitution at this meeting and have 
to do with the admission of new mem- 
bers, with the automatic suspension of 
membership in the Association from 
non-payment of dues, and with honor- 
ary membership. 

To quote again from the minutes of 
the meeting: "Each member shall 
pay to the secretary, at the time of his 
admission, an entrance fee of cne 
dollar and thereafter an annual due cf 
one dollar, which shall be payable at 
the time of the annual meeting; 
except, that members of the graduat- 
ing class may become members 
of the associate alumni, upon 
signifying, on or before graduation, 
their desire to do so, and there shall 
be no assessment on these members 
the first year." The latter part cf 
this by-law is entirely new and is 
superior to the previous methods for 
two reasons; 1st, there is a greater 
incentive for graduating seniors to 
become members of the association 
than if a payment was due at this time 
and 2nd, because the drain upon the 
pocket book of the Senior at Com- 
mencement is extreme and anything 
to lighten the burden at this time fs 
heartily welcome, as may be testi 
| fied by every graduate. It has also 
| been the case that at every com- 
mencement some men have felt it 
beyond their pocket book to pay the 
money necessary to membership, and 
when away from college and not a 
member, the opportunity seems lost. 
The motion in regard to payment of 
dues provides for the suspension from 
active membership of those three 
years in arrears and their reinstate- 
ment when three years' dues are paid 
irrespective of the number of years 
they have not been connected with the 
association. It has been a hardship 
for many, who for years have not been 
! members of the association, to pay up 
five to fifteen dollars in back dues, and 
; the new arrangement does away with 
this. 

In regard to honorary members, the 
| vote stands as follows: "Any person 
who has rendered the College distin- 
guished service may be elected to 
honorary membership by a unanimous 
vote at any annual meeting." 

CO-OPERATION AMONG THE COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 

M. A. C. now has seven well organ- 
ized alumni associations with the pros- 
pect of the formation of others in the 
not distant future. It is not unreason- 
able to suppose that these associations 
might do other work than merely get- 
ting together once a year and renewing 
acquaintances and talking over old 
times. 

Is not there a splendid opportunity 

[Continued on page 10.] 




J. Howe Di.mond 



J. HOWE DEMOND. 

Mr. J. Howe Demond, late of North- 
ampton, was born in Rutland, Wor- 
cester Co., Mass., Oct. 5, 1825. He 
lived with his father upon a farm until 
he was ten years old. His father then 
became engaged in the manufacture 
of rakes, and subsequently bought a 
grist-mill. Mr. Demond worked in the ■ 
shop and mill for three years, except- 1 
ing the winter months, when he at- 1 
tended the common school. In Janu- 
ary, 1828, his father removed to 
Springfield, and was without capital or 
means of subsistence, having lost his 
entire property by fire. Springfield, at 
that time, was but a village, without 
even a railroad. They moved into a 
house on Main Street which was con- 
nected with the old Springfield Bakery, 
and situated on the spot now occupied 
by the Second National Bank. The 
son worked one year in the bakery, 
and afterward wherever he couid find 
employment, meanwhile attending 
school during a part of each winter. 
Among other things, he was paid two 
shillings per week for attending to the 
street lamps. It was his duty to fil . 
trim, and hang the lamps in their 
places, and to bring them in at ten 
o'clock. He worked one season for 
Justin Lombard, feeding silkworms 
and cultivating the mulberry on the 
land where Pynchon Street now is. 

When 18 years of age he took charge 
of Judge Hooker's farm, on what is 
now North Main Street. The place 
had been sadly neglected. Going to 
work with energy and perseverance, 
he brought it nearly all under cultiva- 
tion in the four and a half years he re- 
mained upon it, and for his labor he • 



received the munificent i?i sum of 
sixteen dollars per month and board, 
and house rent for his parents. He 
was allowed to manage the farm ac- 
cording to his own judgement, his em- 
ployer not seeing him oftener than once 
a month. He set out a fine orchard 
ot different kinds of fruit-trees, and con- 
sidered this one of his greatest achieve- 
ments. When 21 years of age he 
purchased of John Mills seventeen 
acres of land situated in what was then 
Plainfield, now "Brightwood," for 
which he agreed to pay two thousand 
and eighty seven dollars. He gave 
him four notes, running a number of 
years, and eighty-seven doilars in 
money, which was all he possessed. 
It was with difficulty that he was able 
to meet the notes as they became due, 
but he succeeded at last in paying 
them, and subsequently purchased of 
Day & Morgan seven acres adjoining 
his farm, and stocked it with cows and 
engaged in the dairy and milk business, 
selling the milk in Springfield. 

With his father's assistance he built 
a house, and improved his farm by 
planting fruit and maple-trees, and 
setting out hedges. He increased his 
purchases of land until he had fifty 
acres running from the Connecticut 
River to Chicopse Street. He raised 
vegetables and tobacco, and did his 
own marketing. He followed this 
bjsiness until he liquidated all his 
debts in 1861. 

In 1871 he sold his farm to Hyde & 
Fiske for $60,000. He then pur- 
chased a residence in Northampton, 
on Elm street, the surrounding grounds 
consisting of seven acres, mostly cov- 
ered with different kinds of fruit. He re- 



moved there in February, 1872, where 
he lived until his death in June. 1909. 
The esteem in which Mr. Demond 
was held by his townsmen was very 
great, as was shown by his election to 
numerous offices of public trust. He 
was connected with the Hampden 
Agricultural Society for many years, 
and had expended a great deal of time 
and money in improving Hampden 
Park, attending to the buiiding of 
dykes and fences, and setting out trees 
and shrubbery. He had also won a 
number of premiums -one of fifty 
dollars for the best conducted farm, 
and a silver cup, presented by Francis 
Brewer, to the owner of the best herd 
of milch cows. In agriculture he was 
a leader, and among the first to avail 
himself of the improvements in farm- 
ing utensils. He bought the first mow- 
ing-machine brought to Springfield, 
which, it may well be said, was far in- 
ferior to those of the present day. He 
was - n of four gentlemen who origin- 
tl e Hampden Harvest Club. In 
1861 he wis elected councilman, and 
s-rv^d four years. In 1881 he was 
appointed trustee of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College by Gov. Long 
and held that office for 28 years, be- 
ing reappointed by Gover lors Russell, 
Crane and Guild. Mr. Demond was 
untiring in his interest for the College. 
giving $1000 for the Library fund in 
1886 and the bell for the new chapel 
in 1891. In addition to this, he spent 
a great deal of his time at the College. 
He was president of the village im- 
provement society, and of the Hamp- 
shire, Hampden, and Franklin Agri- 
cultural Society, and of the Western 
Massachusetts Poultry Association. 
Mr. Demond locked back with pleasure 
to the struggles and privations of his 
earlier years, and he owed his success, 
as expressed in his own words, "to 
great industry, gocd health, temperate 
habits, honesty, good parents and a 
kind Providence." 

Harvey T. Shores, '91. 

To the above we would add the fol- 
lowing extracts from a letter written 
by the Hon. Wm. R. Sessions, for- 
merly secretary of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the college, as showing the 
services rendered the college by Mr. 
Demond : 

"Mr. Demond was at his death the 
oldest, inservice, of the trustees, having 
been, as I think, the successor of Pauli 
Lathrop, one of the original Board. 
He served on many important special 
committees, before the Board was 
organized into standing committees, 
and was, I think, chairman, or at least 
a member of the building committees 
for erection of drill hail, South college, 
College chapel and the building on the 
east side of road near the experiment 
station; and, perhaps, the second barn 
and other buildings 

"He was a good business man, and 
in the days when these buiHings were 
erected was depended on for conser- 
vative judgement and careful over- 
sight of many important matters of 
building and expenditure of money. 
In his day he was greatly leaned upon 
by the trustees." 



NEW COURSES OF STUDY 

The Faculty last spring, after long 
consideration, decided on Important 
changes in the program of studies; 
and the Trustees approved these 
changes. Three lead ng questions 
were involved in the revision: 

1 . How the number of subjects 
required within a semester (especially 
In the first two years) might be les- 
sened, so that the student could stiff ic- 
ienlly concentrate his effort to secure 
more than a hurried view of his 
subjects. 

2. How the required part of the 
course might best be adapted to both 
the general development and the spec- 
ial aims of students. 

3. How much, if at all, greater 
freedomi of election was desirable. 

The first question was answered only 
in part. The new program lessens 
considerably the congestion of subjects 
and the consequent dissipation of 
effort ; but in t he opinion of some, too 
many studies at the same time, and 
perhaps too many hours, are still pre- 
scribed. 

The answer to the second question 
seems generally to be regarded as 
reasonably good, so far as it can be 
judged before time has tested the new 
program. 

The answer to the third question 
perhaps represents an opportunist com- 
promise. Probably the judgment of the 
Faculty was against an extension of 
the elective system into the lower 
years; but so many subjects had to be 
provided for, and the aims of students 
that claimed consideration differed sc 
greatly, that some increased amount 
of election seemed necessary. Ac- 
cordingly, it was determined to pre- 
scribe five subjects in the second 
semester of the sophomore year, 
requiring each student to take two 
additional studies that he should elect 
from a group of six subjects. No 
earlier election is permitted. 

In the last two years of the course, 
the only general prescriptions are: 
Physical Education, two credits in each 
semester of the junior year; Econom- 
ics (first semester, three credits) and 
English (three credits). The neces- 
sary amount of work for the English 
credits may be taken all in one, or it 
may be distributed through more than 
one semester. Neither the Econom- 
ics nor the English has to be taken in 
any stated year of the course. Except- 
ing these restrictions, almost unham- 
pered choice of subjects is now pos- 
sible. This great freedom is, however, 
understood to be experimental ; and it 
may be lessened when there has been 
time to study its results. It may be 
said, however, speaking broadly, that 
— so far as the students are concerned 
— the revised program seems to have 
met approval. — Robert \V. Neal. 

The Purdue Exponent claims that 
Purdue University will, have the largest 
university machine shops in the coun- 
try, when those now building are 
completed. 






8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November if., 1909- 



FARMERS AMONG M. 
ALUMNI 

[Continued from first ya%e] 



C. visited M. A. C. and was most enthus- as to allow a clear space through the of investigation into |»^J^ 

iastic over the progress the College has center of the barn for the use of a hay economic conditions In Massachusetts. 

' , , . * um fork At the time that the 12th census was 

made during the last few years. He fork, 

shows his interest in his Alma Mater The second building under the new taken, Dr. Dewey was employed by the 



, . . SllUWb Illi IIIICIC31 111 1110 niuia mioivi . •■- v , 

in demand for these meetings. He is ^^ t h ives tne plan is a y0 ung stock barn and this Federal Government as a special expert 

always ready to give to others the .. , , l.„i.ju-i »..,.« v,„r.^roH f^t i^ni on waees. as written ,ev- 

results of his practical experience. In 



1905 he delivered a most excellent 
address before the Massachusetts 
State Bo«rd of Agriculture at the 
winter meeting in Worcester, and this 
address was later printed in full in the 
various market gardening and florists' 
papers. In 1907 he was appointed to 
the State Board of Agriculture by Gov- 
ernor Curtis Guild. Jr. 

Mr. Howard was married in 1896 
to Miss Hattie E. Stanley of Franklin. 
They have five girls and Henry M. 
Howard, Jr. Mr. Howard is a mem- 
ber of the College Shakesperean Club. 

'93. 



various college organizations. He has has been built about two hundred feet agent on wages. He has written sev- 
contributed liberally to the Athletic to the west of the barn already de- era! articles and books on d.fferen 
Field fund, to general athletics at the scribed. The general plan is that of a phases of economics, and was one of 
college and also contributes annually rectangular storage barn for hay with the editors of the economic history 
to the Western Alumni Prize. one-story wings running to the south prepared by the Carnegie Institution of 

From time to time Mr. Smith has for the stable. The whole structure is Washington. His career has been 
studied at the Illinois Agricultural Col- built of wood with slate roof and characterized by an intense interest In 
lege following out some line of agricul- shingles for siding, in order to reduce technical education along agricultural 
tural investigation in which he was the cost of maintenance to the lowest as well as other lines, and he has 

possible figure. The storage is eighty- rendered valuable service in his sup- 
seven feet long by thirty-seven feet port of the progress of this work. He 
wide with a barn floor running the brings to the board of trustees the ex- 
shortest way. It has a gambrel roof perience of a long and successful ca- 
and a truss frame, and there are no reer of a teacher and investigator; his 
interior posts. The stable is seventy position on the trustees' committee on 
feet by thirty-four feet and contains on course of study and faculty is one in 
one side five box stalls and a small which his wise influence will be strongly 
grain room, and on the other swing felt. 



especially interested. 

THE NEW BARNS 

Wnen i! became necessary, by the 
unfortunate occurance of Aug. 15, 
1908, to rebuild the M. A. C. barn, 
the trustees, after careful considera- 
tion, approved a plan that would dis- 



Thirty-seven years ago up on the tribute the College property formerly 



Luther W. Smith housed in one large barn, in three dif- 1 stanchions for eighteen head of cattle. In July. Hon. Charles E. Ward of 
was born. Like most country bovs ferent buildings, to be conveniently The floors are of cement with plank Buck.and became successor tc > Mr. 
his early life was occupied with farm located and a suitable distance apart, under the cattle, the walls are sheathed Demond as trustee. Mr. Ward con- 
duties, but his early education was the Two of these buildings, although still with wood, the windows are of the ducts a large and ■""-*"«»"■ 
best the vicinity afforded. In .889 lacking some of the finishing touches, Sherringham valve type to allow for as m,l ler and eah, |„ umbe'Jour 
he entered M. A. C. He was not are alreadv in use. They are ( 1 ) a ventilation; two galvanized iron Van and gran. Although not extensively 
unlike the majority of men entering storage barn for grain and coarse fod- Noorden cowls have also been installed engaged in farm.ng he has ^ a ways 
college He was quiet and unsophis- der large enough to suoply the 64-cow which will give opportunity for some b=en keenly interested in ag 
cated and applied himself diligently to stable built in .907 and (2) a complete studies in ventilation. The stable is and for several years has represented 



the duties of every day college life, storage barn and stable for young stock 

Soon after entering college he joined and bulls. 

Phi Sigma Kappa and he was always The planning of the first barn men- 

an enthusiastic member of the chapter, tioned was not an easy task, owing to 



so arranged that it may be extended the Deerfield Valley Agricultural Soci- 

to twice its length, and the storage ety on the State Board of Agriculture, 

barn is large enough to allow of this. In 1902 he was elected to the General 

The east wing of this building contains Court, and for five years represented 



"In 1902 he served on the commit- 
tee on agriculture. In 1903 he was 
on the committees on education and 
on counties, being chairman of the 
atter. In 1904 he was on ways and 



an enthusiastic memoeroi uieuiayier. uonea wai nut an c<*^ i«»;>i\, uwm S .u nm -«.^ ".■•& ~ o - „ 

He was interested in various phases of the fact that in addition to the usual four bull pens with suitable passageway *e First f™™*^ 1 "^ ™"j 

, L „„„„;.,„ to tu.cnnth \uith Hon. . Lewis Ellsworth, becretar) ot 

college life ; played on his class base- requirements of such a structure^ the and doors opening to the south, w.th J ^ q . a u sum . 

ball team, was a member of the col- new plan imposed three others : First, individual yards. mari zes Mr. Ward's legislative career 

lege glee club and also of various lit- it must be only about half as large as jhe third new building planned is to 
erary societies. In his sophomore the former barn on the same site ; furnish storage for farm tools and ma- ' " 

year he took second prize in the Ken- second, it must be a connecting link chinery. It is located west of the cow 
dall Oratorical Contest. between the stable and the two con- stable on the foundation of a former 

Immediately after graduation from crete block silos seventy-two feet away w j n g f the main barn. It is to be 
M. A. C. Mr. Smith went to Man- to the north: and third, the site was built of terra cotta block with slate 

teno. III. where he assumed the man- partly made uo of two tiers of heavy roof an d pebble dash outside finish to ^^^^"^f ^ une^ 1 At thTclose 
agement of a 560 acre farm, owned and expensive bank walls. These ma tch the buildings nearest to it. of ' tnat sessior1i Speaker Frothinghatn 
by his grandfather. He at once began facts should be considered in any study There will be two floors, each one ann0 unced that if Mr. Ward should be 
to put into practice the principles he of the building that is undertaken. hundred by fortv feet. The main en- returned for the following year, it was 

had Darned at M. A. C. and improved The barn is ninety-eight feet long trances to the lower floor are on the his purpose to appoint him chairman of 
the farm along all lines. He has built and fifty feet wide, although the fram- west and to the upper floor on the ^^^ ^^7^" posit ion! 
up the herd of cattle on the place ing is practically that of a forty foot souln a nd east, both being at about servjng also ' on the cornm j U ee on 
and at the present time has one of the barn with a ten foot extension on the t he level of the ground outside. This 
largest and finest herds in the section, west, as the rafters are longer on that building is still in course of construc- 
tor. Smith is also interested in gen- side. The outside walls are of hollow tion. 
eral farming and has been most sue- terra cctta blocks with » pebble dash" J- A - Eoord. 

cessful along all lines. He now owns outside finish to match the adjoining TrUSTEES. 

a large interest in the place. Aside stable. 

from his home farm developments, he On the basement level there is a In March. Governor Draper appoint- 

K interested in rice olantations in root cellar and work room. The first ed Dr. Davis R. Dewey to succeed S ary, and listened to with attention, 
southern Texas and derives csns.de, „oor , on ,he s 3 me ,evd as th. cow Co,. Carro'd D. Wr lg K, on .he board Very ,ew -e.bers -^ enjoyed^ the 
able revenue from these holdings. stable and connects it with the s.los of trustees of the Massachusetts Agri- 

Mr. Smith is interested in every- and hay mews; on this floor there is cultural College. Dr.Dewey is essen- 
thing which tends toward the develop- storage for about three carloads of grain tially a New Englander, being born and 
ment of his home town and county, and the same of bedding. There is educated for the most part in Vermont; 
For the past nine years he has been a also a wash room with twelve lockers he graduated from the University of 
School Trustee; is Superintendent of for the men and a small room for barn Vermont in 1879, and received his 
the Cattle Exhibit at the County Fair, tools. A scale has been placed at the Ph. D. degree from John Hopkins in 
and for six >ears has been Secretary entrance to the stable so that studies 1886. His natural tastes are along 
of the County Farmers" Institute. He in the cost of prduction may be made, the lines of economics, and he has be 
was appointed delegate to the National The second floor has two sixteen foot come a thorough student in this and 
Farmers' Congress and is president of barn floors entering at about the ground allied subjects. For several years he 
various local farmers' organizations, level on the east and connected on the has been Professor of Economics at 
H is interested in the religious life of west side so that a loaded vagon may the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- attention than ever before. Following 
his community and is an elder in the be drawn in and the empty wagon out nology ; he is a member of the leading the lead of Harvard, quite a number 
Pesbyterian church in his town. again without the necessity of backing economic associations of America, of co leges Jm dropped the game 

' Las Commencement Mr. Smith the team. The building is so framed and has served on various commissions from their hst of intercollegiate sports. 



serving also on the committee on 
rules. In the House of 1906, Mr. 
Ward served (again) as chairman of 
the ways and means committee. 
His service as Representative was 
marked throughout by conservatism 
and wisdom. Not oratorically gifted, 
he nevertheless soon gained the ear of 
the House, speaking only when neces- 



had more influence 



in 



extent, or 
debate." 

Mr. Ward's successful business ex- 
perience, his prominence as a legis- 
lator, and his practical knowledge of 
agriculture and rural condition, admira- 
bly qualify him to serve effectively on 
the administrative board of this institu- 
tion. 

Ralph J. Watts. 

The basketball season attracts less 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 16, 1909. 



DOES THE FRATERNITY HELP 
THE STUDENT? 

[Continued from first page] 



nity pins, and meet for general good 
fellowship in the College Union rooms 
instead of the Fraternity rooms. This 
spirit which causes two Fraternities to is m Y presentation of the "dark" side 
"pull" together on an election, to the of the Fraternity question at M. A. C. 
advantage of their fellow fraternity ! ' ma y- perhaps, be accused of disloy- 
men, and to the disadvantage of the a, 'y t0 m y Fraternity in believing that 
Fraternities shut out. and of far jt and ,he 0,hers should together die a 
greater disadvantage to the College as 'natural and peaceful death, but I can 
a whole, which suffers severely from ' never be accused of disloyalty to my 



every internal strife. 

Aside from satisfying the unexplain- 
able longing for a secret society, our 
Fraternities are of no value to the 
College for they perform no function 
which could not be performed by a fra- 
ternity of the whole student bjdy as 
well or better. They are an added 
expense to the total cost of living at 
College, for which no adequate return 
is received. The cost of a college 
education in New England is already 
so high that many of the best boys in 



College. 



A. C. MONAHAN, '00. 



ALUMNI SECRETARIES' 
ASSOCIATION 

A meeting to institute the M. A. C. 
Alumni Secretarhs' Association will be 
held immediately prior to the 24th 
annual reunion of the M. A. C. Club of 
New York, on Friday evening, Dec. 
3rd, 1909 at the Hotel St. Denis. 
Broadway and 1 lib streets, New York. 
It is hoped to 1 p.ioint temporary offi- 



our High Schools, the boys who ought cers and committees, as a preliminary 



to go to college, cannot go. They are 
one of the many distractions which 
keeps a student from his studies. A 
college is primarily an educational in- 
stitution and a boy is in college prima- 
rily for the purpose of getting an edu- 
cation. Athletics and social activities 
may aid him in getting his education 
in many self evident ways, but when 
either or both become the upmost 
theme in the student's mind, they are 
a hinderance and not an aid. Frater- 
nities exist primarily for social pur- 
poses. If our Fraternities ever suc- 
ceed in building Fraternity houses the 
opportunity for social events will be 
greater, and judging by observation of 
what is taking place in other colleges, 
there will be a greatly increased activ- 
ity in this line. Far too much time 
in our New England colleges is given 
to social affairs. 

Whatever objection can be raised 
against the Fraternities as they exist 
at present, will be increased by hous- 
ing the Fraternities in lodges of their 
own. There the members will be- 
come more bound up with each other. 
they will associate more closely to- 
gether and less closely with their other 
college mates, the "die" spirit will be 
fostered more than at present, and the 
weaker student, taken away from the 
eyes of the whole college, will have 
more opportunity to lead a looser life. 
I believe it is for the best interest of 
M. A. C. to keep the Fraternities in 
the background; that instead of taking 
a stronger hold on life by building 
houses, and increasing in number, 
they should be allowed to die a natural 
death; that the time, energy, and 
money now expended in their support 
should be expended in support of the 
Agricultural club, the Entomological 
club, the Chemical club, the Debating 
club, and societies of like purpose; in 
a broader and better lecture course by 
men of affairs from all over the coun- 
try, who can bring larger ideas to th i 
student body. Substitute college sup- 
pers for Fraternity banquets, wear ten 
dollar College pins instead of Frater- 



to permanent organization In Amherst 

at Commencement in June, 1910. 

Sidney B. Haskell '04, 

Secretary of the Associate Alumni. 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82, 

Sec. of M. A. C. Club of New Yotk. 

Charles Wellington, 
Secretary of the class of 1873. 

F. H. Fowler, 
Secretary of the chss of 1887. 

WlNFIELD AYRKS, M. D. , 

Secretary of the class of 1886. 

E. A. White, 
Secretary of the class of 1895. 
Nou. llth, 1909. 

ADDRESSES WANTED. 

Tne addresses of the following 
alumni will be gratefully received at 
the President's office : 

'7'. George E. Fuller. 

72. Burleigh C. Bell. 

'72. William F. Brett. 

'73. Frank W. Wood. 

'74. William H. Blanchard. 

74. John A. Hobbs. 

76. David A. Bagley. 

76. Joseph M. Hawley. 

77. Charles Brewer. 

'80. Charles M. McQueen. 

'80. Domicos Braune. 

'84. Charles Hermes. 

'84. Llewellyn Smith. 

'87. Charles H. Watson. 

'91. Charles H. Johnson. 

'93. Ernest A. Hawks. 

'93. Frank H. Henderson. 

'95. Robert S. Jones. 

'96. Harry T. Edwards. 

'96. Patrick A Leamy. 

'98. George H. Wright. 

'01. John E. Barry. 

'01. Edward S. Gamwell. 

'01. Julio Ovalle. 

'02. Herbert A. Paul. 

'02. Nelson D. West. 

'03. William E. Allen. 

'03. Howard C. Bowen. 

'03. W. L. Hood. 

'03. Paul N. Nersessian. 

'06. Francis D. Wholley. 




GOODS FOR HEN. 



C. & K. Derby s, 
Reiser Cravats, 



$\ (wi>£) English and Scotch Woolens. 



//' 




THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AM1IKRST. DARTMOUTH. 



'F. U. 



^*^ 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 
Garage Connected. 

REAR OF AMHERST MOUSE 

AMHERST, MASS. 

Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Presser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Rent, 

Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Early and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants Si. 50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance. 

Store 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4. 

THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitation 

Mt-nus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Animals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET A LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



IO 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November i(», 1909. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE HOUSING OF THE UNDER 
GRADUATE 

[Continued from first page.] 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's lilock, AMHERST, M 
Cut flowers always on hand. 

I elephonr or call. 

E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DKNTAIv ROpMi 
Williams Block, Amherst, M\ss. 

1 >i 1 i' 1 Hours: 
OtolSAtMi i.il()to."H'.M. 



Ktlier and Nitrous Oxide (ias admin- 
stered when desired 



BEST FARM IN AMHERST 

Excelled! 2-story house, bath room, 
hot and cold water; best farm in this 
section, running spring water: 40 acres 
tillage. 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber: plenty of fruit and many other good 
features. $6000 in repairs lias been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 



rector. Both Harvard and Yale, to 
name no more, are constantly pushing 
for funds to erect new dormitories; 
statistics from Yale show better 
scholastic work among students living 
in college dormitories, than out of 
them. The variety and restlessness 
of our American life is reflected in our 
colleges; there must be something 
doing all the time; the wide field of 
non-scholastic student activities, it 
seems to me should be curtailed ; a 
"bright fellow" remarked to me that 
ae did not go to college to study but to 
have a good time ; he did not graduate. 
Undoubtedly he must have absorbed 
some good, but is the state getting the 
due profit from its princely investment 
in higher education ? Further, this cul- 
tivation of extra-scholastic things, is 
seen in the unquestioned luxury of 
many fraternity houses ; does not such 
make men softer-fibered ? is the spirit 
good, that is shown by many under- 
graduates living in such luxurious 
homes, that this is mine, given to me 
because of ME and my lordship of 
many things? The cost in time, pain- 
ful effort and money expended by fra- 
ternity executives to overcome this 
species of mania de grandeur is heavy. 
A gentleman bathes often, wears 
clean linen, eats quietly, never takes 
an unfair advantage of a.i opponent 
and will endure to the death for ■ 



to wait awhile, but will be in the game, 
good and strong, somewhere along the 
line. Two-thirds of this money will be 
borrowed; the remaining third will 
have to come from the alumni ! 

The objects of M. A. C. are well 
known; supported by the Federal and 
State treasuries, it stands for the spirit 
of true democracy. The place for 
every undergraduate is in the dormi- 
tories now built and to bi built on the 
plateau running south from the ravine; 
to abolish the fraternities at M. A. C. 
would be without reason; they have 
their place and are to do larger things ; 
their habitats should be wholly In 
secret halis in old North College as of 
the ancient days and rushing of candi- 
dates will depend entirely on the per- 
sonnel of the rushers and not upon 
some luxurious house, which the acci- 
dents of financial fortune in the alumni 
have made possible. These may 
seem strange words to some of my 
readers; I could recount the good 
work done in fraternity houses, and I 
only wish to state, that wherever my 
fraternity has hired or built a house, 
the dormitory facilities have been in- 
sufficient and men otherwise would 
have been living in boarding houses. 
1 yield to no man, in my affection for 
my fraternity, but I do not and cannot 
forget my love for Massachusetts 
Aggie and my duty to the state. 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82. 
New York, Nov. 1, '09. 



W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST, MASS. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone 59-4. 

GAS I'l r 1 i.Mi, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 

Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



friend; is the culture of a fraternity 
house necessary to develop such? 

The fraternity situation at Brown 
had become so acute, that now under 
Faculty supervision, nine chapters are 
located in various halls of the dormi- 
tories to keep the men on the college 
domain. 

We are under no obligation to copy 
other institutions, but we should be 
wise enough to profit by their experi- 
ence. I understand that at M. A. C. 
it is contemplated to put the fraternity 
nouses at the south of the grounds or 
at the east on the Clark eminence; in 
either case, this means a minority of 
the college body being set aside for an 
exclusive life ; while the majority are 
to remain in the dormitories and 
boarding houses. This will be damag- 
ing to the minority fraternity men and 
the majority cannot help the spirit of 
bitterness developing, which may how- 
ever make them strive to excel the 
minority and indirectly do some good 
to said majority. The operation of 
building said fraternity houses will be 
somewhat like this: after considerable 
jockeying at the start, to push the other 
fellow away first, one fraternity will 
make the plunge and put up a house 
costing $20,000; two more will shortly 
follow with houses worth $25,000 
each ; while the fourth will wait and 
erect its thirty thousand dollar house ; 
the new fraternity, despite its youth 
and small number of members, if my 
experience is of any value, will have 



ALUMNI DOINGS AT COM- 
MENCEMENT 1009 

(ConMnued from page 6.1 



for a co-operation which may bring 
these associations into closer touch 
with each other and their Alma Mater? 
There Is much work ahead for the 
Alumni cf M. A. C. to take part in. 
Perhaps in offering prizes, perhaps in a 
systematic campaign for larger appro- 
priations and new buildings. Prima- 
rily and for the present, in getting the 
new athletic field into working order. 
President Butterfield is coming to 
every alumnus of M. A. C. for help in 
this matter. We want to give it. 
Perhaps co-operation in this one proj- 
ect alone might mean much to our 
College. 

It is to be hoped that every alumnus 
has heard how out staunch body of 
trustee, made possible the purchase of 
the "keystone" pieces of land for the 
new athletic field. The prospects are 
bright for the ownership of this land, 
in full, before another year is out. 
Actual progress has been made. 

At the annual meeting in June a 
committee was appointed "to make a 
plan for the co-operation of the various 
alumni associations." 



THE TRUSTEE QUKSTION. 

For the past seventeen years the 
members of the associate alumni have 
had this question at heart. It first 
crystallized at the June meeting of the 
association in 1892, when the subject 
of Alumni representation on the board 
of trustees was thoroughly discussed 



and the following amendment to the 
constitution offered and accepted: 
"that the executive committee shall 
annually, not less than sixty days pre- 
ceding the occurrence of any vacancy 
on the board of trustees, obtain, by a 
written ballot, the vote of the Alumni 
of the association on the candidates 
selected by the association at an 
annual meeting, and that the names 
of the two candidates having the largest 
number of votes, be sent to the Gov- 
ernor, as the candidates of the Asso- 
ciate Alumni." 

Practically this same statement has 
been in force since that time. There 
have been some alterations in wording 
and provision made for action, at time 
of vacancy on tne board caused by 
death or resignation, hut the main 
working has been the same. 

Most of the alumni probably are 
familiar with the results. For some 
years this action of the association 
evidently had some effect for there are 
now, on our board of trustees, five of 
our leaaing Alumni, all of whom 
received endorsement by the associa- 
tion.' There are in addition to these 
men, others on the board whose 
appointment has been urged by the 
Alumni. 

During the last few years there has 
been apparent lack of value to this 
work of nominating candidates. Per- 
haps the reason for this was that the 
College was already well represented 
on the board of trustees. At any rate, 
tnis action by tne aiumm has more 
tnan once been distinctly frowned on, 
by our chief state executive. Tne 
continued nomination of College men 
would seem to indicate that the Alumni 
were acting under orders rather than 
oecause of actual need. Some 
change was evidently needed and we 
have it in the recommendation offered 
at the June meeting. It follows : 
Voted "that the Associate Alumni 
recommend to the board of trustees 
the consideration of the advisability of 
securing legislation which shall pro- 
vide for the representation of the 
Alumni by at least five graduates of 
the College on the board of trustees." 
If such should become a law, the Col- 
lege need never fear that its sons will 
not have a hand in molding the course 
of their mother College ; the alumni 
may feel sure that their interests will 
be well looked out for and that a more 
interested consideration will be tendered 
their trustee nominations. 

Other matters of lesser importance 
came up for consideration at the meet- 
ing and there followed, at Draper Hall, 
a most pleasant banquet attended by 
Trustees. College Faculty and Alumni, 
in large numbers. 

President Butterfield has suggested 

this phrase for the college motto for 

this year "Lend a hand." Alumui. 

lend a hand by becoming acquainted 

with the work of your College, by join- 

: ing the associate alumni, by supporting 

the projects of the College with your 

; influence and money, and finally — 

Come back toM. A. C. in June, 1910, 

with suggestion for the work of the 

associate alumni of Massachusetts 

I Agricultural College. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November, ■(>, 1909. 



1 1 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 



LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



ALUMNI REUNIONS 

A large number of alumni were pres- 
ent during the commencement exer- 
cises last June and various informal 
meetings were held. The secretaries 
of the following classes have sent 
reports of the more formal gatherings 
and these we are pleased to print 
because we are always glad to keep 
closely in touch with fellow graduates 
in M. A. C. 

73. 

But four members of the class of 
'73 were present this year. This 
small number was due to the fact that 
a reunion was held last year. The 
class feels a very cordial sympathy 
with the new reunion scheme and 
expects to arrange its next meeting in 
accordance with the schedule adopted. 
Those present were : Walter Leland, 
John Minor, Seth Warner and Charles 
Wellington. 

Charles Wellington, Secretary. 

75. 

No class reunion was held this year. 
The class secretary, Madison Bunker, 
writes as follows: "In the proposed 
scheme of revised years for reunions, 
my class was set down for one this 
year, but we did not see any reason for 
changing our schedules made some 
time before some of these schemes 
were born and we shall hold forth next 
year. We shall have been out of col- 
lege thirty-five years next June and we 
propose to gather them all in from the 
"Hub" to the "Golden Gate" under 
the shade of the Liriodendron tulipifera 
south of the fountain in front of South 
College. If you don't believe it, ask 
Professor Brooks. Eighteen gradu- 
ated, seventeen are alive and a story 
is hitched to all of them." 
76. 

Th>. class of 76 held their reunion 
and banquet at trie Amherst House. 
Thirteen members of the class were 
present. These were : John Bellamy, 
D. 0. Chickering, Charles F. Deuel 
Charles McConnell, William A. Mac 
leod, George Mann, George A. Par 
ker, George L. Parker, William H 
Porter, Joseph E. Root and John M 
Sears. Henry Barnes and C. A 
Judd of South Hadley, ex-members of 
the class were also present. As this 
made the unlucky thirteen, one visitor 
was invited for the banquet. These 
members of the class were present 
during the greater part of the com- 
mencement exercises and during this 
time they placed a marker at the base 
of their class tree, which is a Colorado 
Blue Spruce, east of the Chemical 
Laboratory. 

C. Fred Deuel, Secretary. 

'92. 
Promptly at 6-30 on Tuesday after- 
noon, June 22d, the following men sat 
down to a fine dinner at Frank Woods: 
Beals, Boynton, Crane, Deuel, Hol- 
land, Hubbard, Lyman, Taylor, Thom- 
son, Williams and Willard. These 
voted to meet again in 1912. 

H. M. Thomson, Secretary. 




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12 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 16, 1909. 



'93. 
No reunion was held by the class of 
'93 this year for their reunion was held 
last year and they felt it would be 
impossible to get enough men back for 
the meeting this year. The secretary, 
however, writes that they expect to 
adopt the reunion scheme for their 
next reunion. 

'94. 

At 8 o'clock Tuesday, June 22, 
at Draper Hall, the class of '94 cele- 
brated the 15th anniversary of its 
graduation. The fact that 18 of the 
class returned to M. A. C. two years 
ago for the reunion in honor of Louns- 
bury's visit to this country made it 
inadvisable to make special efforts for 
a large quinquennial. There were, 
however, 15 men present and all 
responded to toasts proposed by J. E. 
Gifford, who acted as Toastmaster. 
During the evening it was voted to 
accept the reunion plan as recom- 
mended by the Associate Alumni. 
Accordingly the next two reunions will 
be held In 1914 and 1918. The fol- 
lowing were present : Alderman, 
Bacon L. H., Bacon T. S., Barker, 
Brown. Curtis, Davis, Gifford, How- 
ard, Kirkland, Manley, Morse, Put- 
nam, Smead and Starr. 

S. Francis Howard, Secretary. 

'95. 
The class of '95 met at the Pros 
pect House, Amherst, at 6-30 p. m., 
June 22d, 1909, where an excellent 
banquet was served by Mrs. Perry. 
No formal toasts were icsponded to 
but the whole program was most pleas- 
ing and informal. President Jasper 
Marsh presided. The following men 
were present: Burgess, Crehore, Hem- 
enway, Morse, Root, Tobey, Frost 
and White. During the supper letters 
were read from Foley, Potter, Sulli- 
van, Smith, Clark H. E., Lewis, Bil- 
lings and Read. 

E. A. White, Secretary. 

'04. 
Ten members out of twenty attended 
the five-year reunion banquet held in 
Draper Hall June the 22d. Those 
present were : Ahearn, Back, Blake, 
Couden, Elwood, Fulton, Gregg, Has- 
kell, Parker, Raymoth, Staples. 
Prof. M. A. Blake acted as toastmas- 
ter, and called for informal speeches 
from each man. It was voted, that at 
subsequent reunions the ladies of the 
class be invited. 

'08. 
The following members of the class 
of 1908 attended the first reunion of 
the class held last June in the Am- 
herst House. Those present were: 
Anderson, Clarke, Cobb, Coleman, 
Davenport, Dolan, Farley, Regan, 
Shattuck, Whiting, Gillett, Hayes, 
Jackson, Jennison, Johnson, Liang, 
Reed, Sawyer, Thurston, Whitmarsh. 
James A. Hyslop, Secretary. 

The musical clubs of Amherst and 
Williams Colleges will give a joint 
concert Dec. 1 at the Academy of 
Music in Northampton. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College Allen Bros 



Growth in attendance 1904— 1909 
For the past five years the growth in attendance has been 
a steady one. The following statistics represent this growth 
both in Numbers and Percentage: 



Enrolment of Students 
of College grade 






Increase over previous year 
In numbers 


1 904-05 


198 










I905-O6 


214 








16 


I 906-07 


226 








14 


I 907-08 


252 








24 


1 908-09 


289 








37 


I 909- 1 


350 








61 


Total 


increase 


in 


numbers 


152 


Total 


increase in 


pe 


rcent 


76.6 



In percent. 

(approximate) 



8 

6.5 
10 

14.7 

21. 1 



Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



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Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone |6-ia. 



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and Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

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Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

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V 

I 



I 



FOOTBALL NUMBER 

THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COl EGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 23, 1909. 



No. 10 



FOOTBALL REVIEW SOPHOMORES BEATEN. 



^ Season Only Moderately Successful. 
Thirteen "M" Men. 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1 



The close of our football season last 
Saturday furnished the occasion for a 
somewhat detailed review of the year's 
events in football at M. A. C. 

The season was only moderately 
successful, judged from the point of 
view of games won. One victory, two 
tie games, and six defeats was the 
record. The three big colleges we 
play won, but in most cases it cost 
them more effort than usual. The 
trouble was that we did not win from 
the colleges of our own size, as we 
are accustomed to do. Worcester 
and New Hampshire caught us in the 
middle of slumps, and each defeated 
us for the first time in their history. 
Springfield Training School had the 
strongest team they have ever had, and 
defeated us for the first time since 
1892. 

The Aggie team this year was un- 
reliable, that is, the coming game 
could not be judged by the past game. 
Apparently for no reason at all, com- 
plete revolutions of form would be un- 
dergone in a week, and a team that put 
up a magnificent game against Nor- 
wich could do nothing against Worces- 
ter. And the team that could not 
score against Worcester, made a touch- 
down against Williams, and a drop kick 
against Brown. The poor performance 
of the team at Manchester was the 
reverse of what they did against 
Springfield. 

The unreliability of the team was 
two-fold: the change in the quality of 
the playing, and the change in the kind 
of playing. By this last is meant that 
in some games our offensive work 
was strong, and the defensive weak, 
while at other times the reverse was 
true. Occasionally in one game, as the 
Norwich, we were strong in both de- 
partments. Sometimes, as at Man 
Chester, we were weak in both. As a' 
general thing, especially in the back- 
field, our defense was better than our 
offense, but at Williams it was more 
the other way. 

Another fact regarding our style of 
play was that our men had to be scored 
on before they would realize the nec- 
essity for snappy work, and take a 
brace. In the past this has been a 
peculiarity of our teams, and it was 
the same this fall. 

In punting and kicking-off Roberts 
and Schermerhorn more than held their 
own. Morse's drop and place kicking 
was excellent. Our forward passes 
frequently netted long gains, while our 
onside kicks were less successful. 
Straight football was our strong point, 

[Continued on pae« 3.] 



Superior Freshman Team. Sophs Put 
Up a Plucky Fight. 

The annual football game of the two 
lower classes last Saturday was a vic- 
tory for the Freshmen, their team scor- 
ing six points in the first half and two 
in the second. There were no stars in 
evidence on either side. The team 
work was good on both sides, but the 
freshmen excelled in tackling. They 
held their opponents for downs twice, 
made 8 first downs, while the sopho- 
mores made one The best work of 
the sophomores came in the second 
half. 

The game was remarkably free fom 
rough playing in most cases. The 
freshmen now have the privilege of 
smoking on the campus 

The sophomores received the kick- 
off, but had to punt to Goodnough near 
the center of the field. 1913 rushed 
the ball to the 10-yd. line, where they 
lost it on Gore's poor forward pass. 
1912 lost it in turn when they were 
unable to punt on the ihird down on 
account of a poor pass. A short gain, 
and Goodnough picked up a fumble 
and easily scored. Hayden kicked 
goal. Score, 6-0. 

Tne freshmen rushed the ball down 
to their opponent's 30-yard line, where 
they lost it on a fumble. A five-yard 
gain, and time was up. 

Soon after the next kick-off 1913 
punted to Shaw on his 40 yard iine. 
Wood's punt was recovered by 
Moreau. After two short gains, a poor 
pass lost the ball on downs to the fresh- 
men on the sophomore 45-yard mark. 
The ball was then advanced to the 
15-yd. line, where Moreau captured 
Gore's blind forward pass, ar.d carried 
it to the middle of the field. 1912 lost 
5 yardson an offside penalty. and punted 
; to Goodnough whose fair catch signal 
was ignored by Curran, incurring a 
; 15-yd. penalty. Goodnough punted to 
| Shaw on the I -yd. line, who fumbled 
and was finally forced over by O'Brien 
for a safety. Score 8-0. 

The Sophomores made first down, 
then punted, and time was up. 
The summary : 



LADIES ENTERTAIN 

Reception in Honor of Football Team. 
Miss Siegel Recites. 



The ladies of the college gave an 
informal reception to the student body 
in the drill hall last Saturday evening. 
There was a large attendance and t tie- 
efforts of the ladies met with deserved 
success. Those in the receiving 
group were: Mrs. Butterfield, Mrs. 
Kenney, Mrs. Hasbrouck, Mrs. 
McKay, Mrs. Stone, Mrs. Chapman, 
Mrs. Hurd, Mrs. Phil Smith, Mrs. 
Duncan, Mrs. Waugh, Miss Mary 
Goessmann, Mrs. Forristall, Mrs. 
Mrs. MacKimmie, Mrs. Hart, Mrs. 
Eyerley and Mrs. Gordon. The 
chairman in charge of the reception 
was Mrs. Hasbrouck. Mrs. Neal was 
chairman of the entertainment com- 
mittee, Mrs. Hart of the decorating, 
and Mrs. Wellington of the refresh- 
ment committee. 

At the northern end of the hall was 
suspended a huge American flag, at 
whose base stood a bank of foliage 
plants. A very pretty and nove 1 fea- 
ture of the decorations was a large M 
gleaming in maroon electric lights 
from the center of the promenade flag 
On the wall opposite the entrance t 
set the national, state and battali n 
flags. The orchestra stand was 
placed against the wall at the right of 
the main entrance. The wall at the 
back of the stand was covered by the 
Stars and Stripes, while the orchestra 
was surrounded by ferns and chrysan 
themums. Four large serving tables 
set with candelabra stood at the north- 
ern end of tne hall. 

During the evening several recita 
tions were given by Mi*s Sieg 1 f 
Middletown, Conn., and a few orches- 
tral selections were very well played 
by the /college orchestra. H. H. 
I Jenney gave two excellent clarionet 
! solos accompanied by H. Hyland at 
the piano, and a quartette, consisting 
of P. W. Allen, Elis, French and F. 
A. Prouty sang a few selections. 
After this entertainment the college 
songs were sung, and the evening was 
brought to a close by informal dancing. 



MORSE ELECTED. 

H. B. Morse to Heat! Football Squad. 
Adams to be Manager. 

Henry B. Morse, classof 191 I, who 
was re iy ee tea captain of next 
i bail team, comes from 
Silem, Massachusetts. He gradua- 
I i fr m the High school there In 
1907, after playing one year as right 
end of the High school team. Since 
coming here, he has always been very 
prominent in athletics. His freshman 
year he played quarterback on his class 
eleven which tied the 1910 team 0-0. 
While a sophomore, he made varsity 
quarterback and played the position in 
every game of the season. During 




1913. 



1912. 



O'Brien, 1. e., 
Hayden, 1. t.. 
Putnam, 1. g., 
Blake, Griffin, c. 
Samson, r. g., 
Baker, r.t.. 



r. e., Tower. Brett 
r. t., Walker 
r. g.. McGarr 
c, Wales. Dodge 
1. g.. Robinson, Sellew 
1. 1, Eisenhaure 
Hubbard. Capt.. Larsen, r. e , 

1. e., Curran, Lloyd 
Gore, q. b., q. b, Bent, Shaw 

Goodnough. 1. h. b., r. h. b., Williams 

Howe, Shea, r. h. b., 1. h b., Wood 

Ames, Harrington, f. b. f. b., Moreau, Capt. 

Score : Freshmen 8, Sophomores 0. 
Touchdown, Goodnough. Goal, Hayden. 
Safety, Shaw. Referee, Schermerhorn MO. 
Umpire, Johnson "08. Field judge, Sum- 
mers 07. Head linesman. Gribben. Time, 
two 20-minute periods. 



PEARSON ELECTED 

Last Friday's chapel exercise was 
I given over to Manager Adams, who I 
held a mass meeting for the election of 
■ assistant manager of the football team. 
. The candidates were Wiiiiam R. Bent, 
i Charles C. Pearson, and Fred S. Mer- 
rill of the class of 1912. Pearson 
was elected by a large majority. 

The committee on arrangements of 
the Massachusetts Creamery associa- 
tion for the January meeting met at 
the college Saturday. 



Captain Morse 
the same ye^rhe captamed the Sopho- 
more team from his place at quarter- 
back. This year he has again v-ry 
creditably guided the team through its 
ups and downs. He has always played 
I a strong and steady game. His sue - 
cesses in handling the ball gives the 
team confidence in him, for it is only 
very seldom that anyone sees him 
fumble. His two years of experience 
has well fitted him for the position of 
captain. 

James F. Adams, the recently elec- 
ted manager of the football team, grad- 
uated from Melrose High school in 
1907. He has been prominent in 

[Continued on page 10.] 



\^ 



'. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL f e ZLTL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R.CLARKE, 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911, 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910, 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOS1AH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911, 



Editor-in-Chief. 
Asst. Editor. 
College Notes. 
Athletic Notes. 
Alumni Notes. 
Department Notes. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, Colleg* Notes. 

SIGNAL OKI-ICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1 - 1 5 p. M. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30. 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9-15 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 P. M. 

Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 m. 



It is that spirit that 
in the world to make 
successes, the spirit of loyalty and de- 
votion. And, too, it's this spirit, that 
in years to come, will raise the name 
of "Massachusetts" to a place that 
can only be reached by the deepest 
reverence and devotion of her sons. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 191 1 . Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912, Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Part Office. 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, NOV. 23. No. 10 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

N 0V . 24—1 p. m. Thanksgiving recess 

begins. 
25— Thanksgiving Day. 
29 — 1-00 p. m. College opens. 
30 — 7-00 p. m. Stockbridge club 

meeting in Agricultural room. 

Senior class play rehearsal In 

Chapel. 
Dec. I — 1-15 p. m. Assembly— Mass 

meeting. 

7-00 p. m. Debating club in 

Agricultural room. 
2—6-45 p. M. Y. M. C 

meeting in Chapel. 
3_7-00 p. m. Senior class 

rehearsal in Chapel. 
4 — Mettawampe Trek. 




A. 



play 



With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4,00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 

Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 



JAMES F. PAGE. 



Because of the Thanksgiving recess 
the issue for Nov. 30th will be omitted. 
The following issue, Dec. 7th, will be 
edited by A. H. Sharpe '11. 



The communication in regard to the 
fraternity question is only the natural 
outgrowth of the articles on the ques- 
tion published last week. We surely 
would like to hear the other side, the 
best side of the fraternities, from some 
of the alumni who feel the way the 
undergraduate body feels. The ques- 
tion is, how really bad after all are the 
fraternities? While we do not con- 
tend for a minute that they cannot be 
improved, we do state that the frater- 
nities do more for the inner life of M. 
A. C. than any one thing. 



The Signal wishes to express its 
satisfaction at the election of H. B. 
Morse as captain of next year's eleven. 
For the past two years Morse has put 
up an extremely creditable game at 
"quarter" and many times his bril- 
liant work has brought him applause 
from the grandstand. The same sat- 
isfaction is expressed at the election the 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

To the Editor of the Signal : 

Permit me through your columns to 
call attention at this time to a matter 
which I consider of vital importance 
to the student body. I refer to attend- 
ance at the Sunday Chapel addresses. 
During my college experience in two 
institutions, one about three and the 
other fifteen times as large as our 
own, and both having splendid oppor- 
tunities for securing the best speakers, 
1 attended courses of Sunday lectures 
which were considered interesting, 
forceful, and uplifting from every stand- 
point, but I am free to state that the 
nine Sunday addresses we have had 
thus far, in their adaptation to the 
needs of College men and in their 
effective handling of the subjects pre- 
sented, are the best I have ever 
attended. A course of such lectures, 
followed up for a year by a conscien- 
tious and open-minded student, would 
do infinitely more to prepare him for a 
life work than the best course in col- 
lege. On Nov. 14th last, the chapel 
was addressed by Harry W. Arnold of 
International Committee of the 



E. E. MILLETT 

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of J. F. Adams as Manager. His is 
a position of great importance and we 
feel that he will be "the man for the 
place." With these two men leading 
the squad next year there needs to be 
no fear as to the outcome. We wish 
them success. 



Y. M. C. A. New York City. The 
thirty-five or forty men who heard him 
will not soon forget his manly, elo- 
quent appeal for character and service 
among college men and the last address ! 
by John R. Boardman was fully up to 
the high standard set. Whatever 

I other opportunities students are com- 

Yes, the Springfield game has come ! pelled to forego, this should not be 
and gone. It may be late to comment one. 

upon it, but we cannot refrain. Of i By the above communication, writ- 
course the papers say, "the Aggies ten without President Butterfield's 
lost to Training School 1 8 to 6, " but did knowledge and possibly without his 
they say that although defeated, every ! approval, and having freshly in mind 
heart in those three hundred rooters j the gains and losses of my own college 
was filled with pride, proud of their experience, 1 mean to say that M. A. C. 
team that fought so manfully, proud of men cannot afford to be absent from 
their college, and proud to be counted Sunday Chapel 



BROWNIES 

PHOTO GRAPHIC SU PPLIES 

Be sure you get an 

EASTHAN FILH 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



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To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
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NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



as her students? The right spirit was 



(Signed) 



F. B. McKay. 




8 





AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E.-Y. Cosby Prop. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909. 



FOOTBALL REVIEW 

[Continued from first page] 



line playing rather than end plays pre- 
vailing. Fumbles were comparatively 
rare, but recovery of opponent's fum- 
bles aided us often. The number of 
points scored against us was 1 10, while 
we made only 27. Our points were 
destributed through five of our con- 
tests, including the Brown and Wil- 
liams games. 

Our first game, that with University 
of Maine at Orono, we were able to 
tie, at a 0-0 score. This game we 
should have won, and the Maine col- 
lege congratulated itself on holding us 



circle our ends, work onside kicks, 
forward passes, and trick plays, and 
eventually win. But the Maroon team 
played with such a degree of snap and 
vim, and tackled so well that Norwich 
could do absolutey nothing, and our 
one touchdown was sufficient to win. 
The magnificent game our men put up 
was highly satisfactory and encourag- 
ing, and the outlook was bright. 

But the next Saturday, against Wor- 
cester Polytechnic Institute on the 
Campus, they showed a reversal of 
form that was as difficult to explain as 
it was appalling. No headwork, high 
tackling and charging, listless playing, 



great disappointment, for the playing in 
that game was the worst of the whole 
year. The team was somewhat crip- 
pled, and slow and lifeless. Score, 
0-17. 

Our last game, that with Springfield, 
was well fought, the men fighting to 
the last. But the men were crippled, 
and lighter than their opponents, and 
could not win, although the spirit shown 
was superb. Score 6-18. 

The number of men out for football 
was large at the beginning of the 
season, but soon fell off to such an ex- 
tent that it was a difficult matter to 
get together a strong scrub. This 



FOOTBALL SUMMARY 

Of last year's team seven men 
started the season : Captain Blaney, 
Leonard. Hosmer, Schermerhorn, 
Hazen, Morse and Walker. Several 
others of the old squad also reported, 
Moreau, McGarr, Lew, Roberts, 
Nickless and McGraw. The bulk of 
the remainder were freshmen, the 
most prominent being Hubbard, 
O'Brien, Goodnough, Baker, Ames, 
Hayden, Larsen, Powers, Howe, Gore 
and Samson. All of the old "M" 
men again made the letter, except 
Hazen, who was injured in the middle 
of the season, and forced to retire. 




Hubbard 



Coach Gage Mgr. Allen 

Walker Moreau Goodnough Leonard O'Brien Powers 

Morse Hayden Capt. Blaney Roberts Hosmer 



Schermerhorn 



down. Our Dartmouth game was well 
contested, but our light line could not 
withstand the attacks of the fast and 
heavy backfield of the Green. Score, 
0-22. At Union, a new college on 
our schedule, we were scored on, then 
turned and scored showing a power of 
attack that could gain consistently, for 
before the game was o'ver we had 
carried the ball over again, but the 
officials would not permit or admit the 
score. Final score, 6-6. 

The fast and foxy Norwich Univer- 
sity aggration were next met on the 
Campus. Norwich had been beating 
some of the best teams in New Eng- 
land on the new style of football, and 
came here confidently expecting to 



all contributed to our defeat. Score, retarded the development of the first 
0-2. team as well as did the changing per- 

Williams won from us, scoring three sonel of the squad. Many fairly good 
times in each half. In the second our players dropped out after a few weeks 
team developed the strongest offence 'of practice, thus nullifying the work of 
of the year, and by steady line-bucking j the coach, for second string men re- 
scored a touchdown against the heavy quired as much coaching as the regu- 



Berkshire team. Final score, 6 33, 

Brown University was surprised by 

our stubborn defense, as well as by a 



lars did. 

The team was fortunate during the 
eariy part of the season in the matter 



little offensive work, and had hard \ of injuries, coming through the first 
work to get six points in each half. ; three games in good shape. Then 
Both sides fumbled a great deal, sprains, torn ligaments, and lame 
Brown being the worse, and our recov- \ shoulders began to appear, and by the 
ery of the ball frequently aided us in time the last game arrived the major- 
holding our opponents. Score, 3- \ ity of the players were in no condition 
12. I to do themselves or the team jus- 



The New Hampshire game was a 



tice. 



I Six men made their letter for the first 
time: Moreau '12, Hubbard, Hayden, 

; Powers, O'Brien and Goodnough. 
Captain Blaney '10. at right half 

' has been playing a strong, reliable 
game all fall. While good at carrying 
the ball, he shone especially on the 
defense. He was one of the surest 
tacklers on the team, and backed up 
the line well. 

Schermerhorn '10 at tackle put up 
his old reliable game, and was usually 
able to stop and plays directed at him. 
His punti ig was excellent, outdistanc- 
ing his rivals practically every time. 
He broke into the limelight at Spring- 
field, when he blocked a forward pass, 
and scored. 









The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909- 



WHAT ABOUT 



THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trousering*, and Rain Cloth, 



Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. railing, 3 M vds - 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black unfinished. 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black finished, 14 <>z. raiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue. 12 oz. suiting. 3 1-2 yds. ■ 

Rain Cloth, $3-5° l )er y d - Trouserings, 



$12.50 
$11.50 
$10.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 

$3-s° P er > ,ard - 



I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A. 



P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 



IN 



Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

ty Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
witb a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our huge assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room, 
decorations. 



M.I). OILMAN. C. A.MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

■20T t<> m Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



Leonard '10 played end for three 
games, then tackle the rest of the 
season. He was a consistent player. 
Hosmer '10 at left half was erratic. 
At times he was excellent at carrying 
the ball, and as a usual thing tackled 
hard. 

Morse ' 1 1 at quarter was one of the 
best all-round men on the team. His 
judgement was good, his tackling 
deadly, and drop and goal-kicking sure. 
Walker '12 at guard showed much 
improvement over last year's form. 
He was out of the game for some time 
with an injured knee. 

Roberts at full and half was good at 
both offense and defense. His kick- 
ing was superb. He too was prevented 
from playing several games by his 

knee. 

Hubbard '13 and O'Brien '13 at 
the end positions made our wings 
strong. The tackling and interference- 
breaking of both was all that could be 
desired. Their way of taking forward 
passes made them valuable also. 

Hayden '13 played every game at 
center, and usually held his man suc- 
cessfully. His work was aggressive. 
His worst fault was an occasional poor 
pass. 

Goodnough ' 1 3 was a good all-round 
man. He played aggressively at 
either half, and was a good tackier. 
Moreau '12 at full-back was our 
best line-plunger. His defensive work 
was poor, but improved gradually. 

Powers at tackle and guard played 
in every game. He was handicapped 
by an injured side. 

McGarr '12 played in four games, 
Lew in three, and Baker '13, Ames 
'13, Larsen '13, Gore ' 13, Samson 
'13, and Howe '13 in one or more 
games. It looks now like a fine team 
next year. 

The work of Coach Gage is to be 
highly recommended. He did excel- 
lent work with a small and constantly 
shifting squad, and has laid the founda- 
tion for winning teams in following 
years. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 
know that their shoes are 

right. 
Prices $3.50, $4.00. $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Hlock 
Amherst, Mass. 



jE. N. PARISEAU,^ 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates acts, pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3ct. pieces 5octs. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 " Broken Hank and Confederate 

Hills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mail Auction I miliars ami 

Selling price lint. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &S0N 



Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 




COX SONS 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



COLLEGE SPIRIT 

1 wonder if the Alumni of the Col- 
lege have an adequate idea of the 
magnificent college spirit displayed 
both by our football team and by the 
student body, at the Springfield game 
a week ago last Saturday? I have 
never seen a football team struggle 
against odds more gallantly, or more 
cleanly It was a magnificent exhi " | LIVERY, BOARDING anfJ 
bition of the traditional M. A. C. grit. 
Equally noteworthy was the splendid 
support given the team by practically 
the whole student body, which was in 
attendance at the game. There was 

"no variation or shadow of turning" in 

the cheering, but it was kept up to the 

last moment of play, and showed itself 

equally well after the game was over. 
I think our Alumni ought to know 

this, and to appreciate what it means. 

Probably this is not the first time that 

this splendid spirit has been shown ; 

but when we consider that nearly 



FEED STABLES 

Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



F. H. WARREN 
& SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

A number of insect cases have been 
added to the equipment of the depart- 
ment to accommodate the rapidly 
growing collections. 

PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 

The annual fertilizer work is rapidly 
approaching completion and the results 
are being tabulated for publication in a 
bulletin. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

The landscape gardening department 
has been adding to its equipment a 
number of hand levels, hand com- 
passes and pocket transits. These 
instruments are especially useful in 
reconnolsance surveys, and the men 
in course 1 have already tested them 
in the field. 

The department has also purchased 
a considerable collection of the famous 
Copley prints representing the best 
modern work of various landscape 
painters, especially Americans. These 
are used in the various exercises of 
the several courses, more especially 
in connection with the senior studies 
in composition. 

In a recent examination the students 
in course 5 were asked what works of 
art they had themselves most enjoyed. 
Twenty-seven replies may be summar- 
ized as follows : works of architecture 
4, literature 5, (poetry 2, prose 3), 
music 6, pictures 2, sculpture 1 , land- 
scape 9 (including natural landscape). 
Two men spoke with special approval 
of the musical concerts at Mt. 
Holyoke. 

At the feeding barn the department 
is carrying out a number of feeding 
experiments to compare the economy 
and nutritive effect of corn meal and 
ground oats for milk production. It is 
claimed that ground oats are of excep- 
tional worth for milk production. One 
experiment is designed to throw light 
upon this subject. 

Another experiment about to begin 
is to note the feeding value of dried 
beet pulp which is now being shipped 
into Massachusetts in considerable 
amounts. It is questioned whether 
farmers can afford to use such ma- 
terials in place of corn and hominy 
meals. 

Experiments are also in progress to 
note the comparative digestabilities of 
alfalfa and clover when cut at similar 
stages of growth. 

It is intended a little later to study 
the effect of lactic acid and lactates 
upon digestibility and to endeavor to 
ascertain whether this acid exerts any 
noticeable depression upon the digesti- 
bility of foods with which it is fed. 
Experiments have shown that molasses 
does exert such depression upon other 
food stuffs and it is assumed this is 
caused by the action of various bact3ria 
in converting molasses into lactic acid. 
Messrs, Holland and Kennedy have 
practically completed studies of the 



rancidity of butter fat. Results will 
be published in the annual report of the 
station. 

AGRICULTURE. 

R. L. Gribben spoke Nov. 3rd 
before the Hardwick grange on "Cow 
Testing Associations." 

W. P. Lockwood recently spoke 
before the Foxboro grange on 'Im- 
proving Methods of Milk Production." 

BOTANY. 

At the last Botanical Seminar Dr. 
G. E. Stone read a paper on "Influ- 
ences of Electricity on Microorgan- 
isms." The November "Botanical 
Gazette" contains an article on the 
results of these researches by Dr. 
Stone. W. R. Regan read a paper 
on "Influence of Spraying Mixtures on 
Vegetation." 

At the next seminar it is expected 
Elsie Locke will speak concerning 
contrivances by which seed is dissemi- 
nated and H. M. Jennison on cell- 
division. 

Prof. L. R. Jones, Professor of 
Botany at the University ot Vermont, 
inspected the department Friday. 



ALUHI 
ATTEITIOI 





LIBRARY. 

Among the books received at the 
College Library during the past week 
may be mentioned the following: — 
World to-day v. 6-16. 1 904-09. 
World's Work, v. 1.-17. 1900-09. 
Suburban Life. v. 2-8. 1906-09. 
Holstein Friesian Herd books, v. 26-27 
The Old Farmer and his Almanac. 

— Kittredge. 
U. S. Dept. of Agr. Yearbook, 1908. 
Iowa Yearbook of Agr. 1908. 
Agriculture in Massachusetts, 1908. 
Reinforced Concrete Construction. 

— Turueaur and Maurar. 
The Garden Yard— Hall. 
Charles Darwin — three appreciations. 

— Macfarlane, 



H 



1911 IN DEX 



Will be out by the first of December 

*md vour order should 

be in now. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Receipts and expenses of the Spring 
field game. 

RECEIPTS. 

Tax, 
Special car, 



$36.75 
37.10 



The Sons of Massachusetts can well be 
proud of the standard set for the annual and 
no alumnus can afford to be without one this 
year. The 191 1 Index will be a banner an- 
nual of a banner year. 



EXPENSES. 

Car, 

Band, 

Confetti, 

Express, 

Telephone, 



$73.85 

$34.50 

31.00 

3.40 

.25 

.20 

$69.35 
4.50 



PRICE, $1.50. 



POSTPAID, $1.75 



Balance, 
Respectfully submitted, 

E. Farnham Damon. 



No text books are to be used in the 
Economics course at Dartmouth this 
year. Instead the class has been 
asked to subscribe to the New York 
Post, and to read the paper thoroughly, 
in order to discuss economic questions 
in class. 



Order now of 

Herbert \V. Blaney, 

Bus. Mgr. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909- 









ALUMNI NOTES. 

The following list of marriages, 
births, and deaths among the alumni, 
is as complete and accurate as the 
editors can make it for the year Nov. 
I, 1908— Nov. I, 1909. 

MARRIAGES. 

'75. December 26, 1908, Joseph F. 

Barrett to 

'00. September 11, 1909, Howard 

Baker to Miss Bertha E. 

Smith at South Hadley. 
'02. August 18, 1909, S. Leroy 

Smith, to 



'04. 



'04. 



'05. 



'05. 



'05. 



'06. 



•06. 



*07. 



'07. 



"07. 



'08. 



'08. 



'03. May 25, 1909, Lester F.Harvey 

to Miss Laura B. Averill. 
'03. June 30, 1909, Aloert Persons 
to Miss Marlon Sawyer, at 
Maiden. 
'03. August 27, 1909, George H. 

Lamson to 

December 25, 1908. Sidney B. 
Haskell to Miss Florence 
L. Dacy. 
September 26, 1909, Clarence 
H. Griffin to Miss El zabeth 
Babette. 
ex-'04. March 31, 1909, H. T. Witt 
to Miss Amy B. Crombie. at 
Manchester, N. H. 
June 3, 1909, Percy F. Wil- 
liams to Miss. Frances K. 
Heard. 
June 30, 1909, Hugh L. Barnes 

to Miss Annie E. Carter. 
September 22, 1909, E. T. 
Ladd to Miss Annie R. Bes- 
som. 
June 8, 1909, H. A. Suhlke to 

Miss Maude Hubcl. 
October 6, 1909, W. C. Tan- 
natt, Jr., to Miss Allice E. 
Burt, at Easthampton. 
December 22, 1908, John T. 
Caruthers to Miss Annie P. 
Greene. 
December 31. 1908, Wayland 
F. Chase to Miss Florence 
McDermit. 
March 27. 1909, George H. 
Chapman to Miss A. J.Dick, 
at Thomaston, Conn. 
December 24, 1908, Leroy E. 
Cutting to Miss Bertna W. 
Hariow, at Amherst. 
June 22, 1909, P. M. Eastman 

to 

June 30, 1909, Raymond D. 



'02. To Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. 
Dacy, at Morgantown, West 
Va. ; a daughter, Nov. 1 , 
1909. 

'03. To Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Bacon, 
a daughter, April 7, 1909. 

'03. To Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Jones, 
a son. 

'04. To Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Fulton, 
at Amherst, a daughter, 
Verabel; March 30, 1909. 

'05. To Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Tup- 
per, at West Newton, a 
daughter; November 19, 
1908. 

'05. To Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Walker, 
at Amherst, a son, Lewell 
Seth, Jr. 1 December 14, 
1908. 

'05. To Mr. and Mrs. J. J.Gardner, 
at Bethel, N. H., a daugh- 
ter, Christine Hannah; Jan- 
uary 16, 1909. 

'06. To Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Pray, a 
son, Francis Civille; May 
19, 1909. 

ex-'06. To Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
Colton, a daughter, Tnelma ; 
January 15, 1909. 

'07. To Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Bartlett, 
at Honolulu, a daughter, 
Gladys Marion ; July 22, 
1909. 

'08. To Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cum- 

mings, at Chicago, a son; 

August 25, 1909. 

'08. To Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Wright, 

at Sherborn, a daughter, 

Caroline Farrar ; August 25, 

1909. 

DEATHS. 

ex-'73. Charles M. Cooke, at Hono- 
lulu. August 27, 1909. 
'72. John C. Cutter, at Worcester, 

February 2, 1909. 
"90. George B. Simonds, July 19, 

1909, 
'07. Arthur H. Armstrong, at West 

Gardner, December 20, 

1908. 
Editor's Note: — The preceding 
notes were received for the Alumni 
issue but could not be used. 




'08. 



'08. 



"97. 



'00. 



'02. 



Whitmarsh to Miss Emma 
Nichols, at Greenfield. 
August 31, 1909, W. L. Howe 
to Miss E. Mildred Walker, 
at Marlboro. 

BIRTHS. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Drew, at Greenwich, Conn., 
a son, William Brooks; 
December 11, 1908. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Austin W. 
Morrill, at Orlando, Florida, 
a son, Austin W., Jr.; 
April, 1909. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Orrin F. 
Cooley, a daughter, Dorothy 
May; March 24, 1909. 



SIGNAL FINANCES 

Statement for the College Signal. 
Assets as weekly to Nov. 1 , 1909. 
Subscription, $1,251.00 

Advertising, 457.23 



$1,708.23 
Assets as Bi Weekly, $307.95 



Total Assets, $2,016.18 

expenses. 

As Bi Weekly, $304.62 

Changes from Bi Weekly 

to Weekly, 44.07 

As Weekly, $282.34 



$631.03 
Assets to Balance Account 

Nov. 1, $1,385.15 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. Farnham Damon, 

Business Mgr. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, • 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November, 23, 1909. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



In stock feeding we chiefly concern ourselves with a study of the 
animal and its needs. So in plant feeding we must make an intelligent 
study of the needs of the living crop, and in the study of this problem 
we must also study the soil, its latent or potential fertility, its physical 
and chemical characteristics, and particularly the lower orders of life 
which it contains, the bacteria and other unseen forces, to the end that 
we may know what each contributes to the upbuilding not alone of the 
soil, but of the crop life above the soil, upon which all higher forms of 
life and activity depend. 

Our problem then is not only to conserve, but to supply the bal- 
ance of ready plant food required by the growing crop, as milk or pre- 
pared food is supplied to the growing child. 

Study the plant food problem 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum *n d High Streets, 



Hartford, Coi\i\. 




THOMPSON 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Walter S. Garde. 



Q&rp^rvter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



Sporting Goods 

Store and 

Repair Shop. 



Don't strain your 
eyes by using a kero- 
sene lamp or an elec- 
tric lamp hung in the 
center of the room. 

Call and see our 
full line of Portable 
Electric Lamps at 
$2.50 up. 

3 handsome Read- 
ing Lamps at a very 
low price. 

Coat and vest pock- 
et lights. All prices. 

Batteries and El- 
ectrical Novelties. 






Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



E. A. Thompson 



Rear of First Nat. Bank. 



three-fourths of our student body have 
been in college less than a year and a 
half, it becomes very significant. 

I want also to say a word to the stu- 
dent body on this point. Don't let 
anything come in to mar this feeling 
of unity Try to apply the same spirit, 
of loyalty to the college, to other stu- 
dent activities, and to the college work 
as a whole. I feel especially anxious 
that the various fraternities, as they 
seek for suitable men, shall observe to 
the letter the rules that have been laid 
down, and in spirit as well as in letter, 
shall "play fair." There will neces- 
sarily be fraternity rivalry ; let there 
be no fraternity antagonism. Observe 
the rules. Be square to one another, 
and remember that the College and 
the college spirit are of more signifi- 
cance than any fraternity advantage. 
Kknyon L. Butterfield. 

THE FRATERNITY SYSTEM. 

The two articles which appeared in a 
recent issue of the Signal concerning 
the fraternity lif^; at this college should 
receive considerable attention from 
every one interested In the develop 
ment of Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. One discusses the fraternity 
nouse problem, which is a live ques- 
tion and which must be settled soon. 
It is written by an alumnus of the col- 
lege who has had considerable exper- 
ience in fraternity life and understands 
the difficulties attendant with life in 
fraternity houses. The other takes up 
the complete fraternity system which 
now seems to be permanent, but like 
all systems in a college which is de- 
veloping rapidly must advance with the 
college. It is hardly becoming an un- 
dergraduate to pit his judgement against 
that of men who have attended this 
college a greater number of years and 
who have had wider experiences in life, 
and it is not my intention to do so. I 
am simply trying to present the frater- 
nity system as it is to-day and how it 
appears to an undergraduate. I be- 
lieve these are the opinions of the men 
of the college to-day who are acquain- 
ted with the fraternity life as it now is 
and who are trying to solve the frater- 
nity house problem of the near future. 

The fraternity system here is two 
years older than the oldest class and 
its development has kept pace with 
that of the institution. Among one of 
its earliest problems was that of hous- 
ing the members and I find that plans 
were formed by each fraternity at an 
early date for the building of a house. 
Building lots have been in the hands 
of each fraternity for some years and 
it is safe to say that only the athletic 
field proposition has kept some of them 
unoccupied until now. Every frater- 
nity has, no doubt, some fund in store 
which will at least be sufficient to start 
the building and save some part of the 
three thirds from being borrowed or 
raised by the alumni. The financial 
end of house ownership has been ably 
investigated by undergraduates and 
alumni and seems a good investment 



T. Iv. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To J{eception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE! 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for M. A. (\ Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Prcsser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style. 

Full Dress Suits for Rent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Karly and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance 

Store 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS P/A/S 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

< I. ins Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <& LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



a 

t 



8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909- 




GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

-^ English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 

.^V//.^^^^^^^^^^•■V.^^^^^^••••'•••••'••••• V •■■ V • V ■ V •■• V •'■'•'•'•■•'•'• 



for a fraternity. The competitive spirit 
among the fraternities in regard to 
the cost of the houses seems to be 
absent and a plan to agree to a moder- 
ate sum which shall not be exceeded 



fraternity official receives the same 
obedience from the fraternity brother 
as does the command of a Jesuit father 
upon a lay member of that order. The 
obedience of the fraternity man to the 



in tne erection has already been pro- 1 orders of his superiors has been tha 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



THE OLD CORKER DRUG STORE. 



I 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 

J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's lilock, AMHERST, MASS, 

Cut flowers always on hand 

TelepfaoM <>r call. 



Holland's Block. 



•hoenix Row 



STEAM PITTING, Tel s pto — W-» 

QAS PITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

CHURCH Windows, 
Memorial WINDOWS, 

Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



E.B DICKINSON D D S 

DEMTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

Ol'l l< I lloi'RS: 



Ktlier and Nitrous Oxide (las admin 
stered when desired 



BEST FARM IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, bath room, 
hot and cold water; best farm in this 
section, running spring water: 40 acres 
tillage, 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber: plenty of fruit and many other good 
features. > r >ooo in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
iS months. I'rice now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 

W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST. MASS. 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St 
Telephone 36-12. 



posed. When the hous-s are freed 
from debt the next step will no doubt 
be the establishment of chapter en- 
downment funds. In some instances 
this has already been done at other 
institutions. Certain chapters have 
established scholarship funnd, the in- 
come of which is to be used to aid 
needy members. Other instances are 
known where these funds are applied 
to libraries and for keeping up class 
relations with the alumni. The life in 
the houses will no doubt be handled 
as successfully as the whole fraternity 
system is handled here now. It will be 
controlled by the standards and honor 
of the individual fraternities which 
is sufficient now and I see no reason 
for deterioration caused by better hous- 
ing of their members. 

The interests of the fraternities are 
inseparable with the interests of the 
college and their ideals of government 
are for the best good of the college. 
I know of no instance where a frater- 
nity has been founded which does not 
regard the welfare of the institution as 
of first importance and I have been 
initiated into three of different natures. 
A casual reading of fraternity literature 
almost invariably meets with an article 
urging the men to greater effcrt in col- 
lege organizations and interests. I 
have found these words embodied in a 
resolution passed by a fraternity; "the 
active members who desires to show 
by deeds not words, his love for the Folsom 
Order will, first of all, eagerly persue 
his several courses of study and strive 
to excel in them to the best of his 
ability. He will do everything in his 
power to further all the various inci- 
dental activities of college life, such as 
partaking in athletics, interclass and 
intercollegiate debating, assisting in edi- 
ting and publishing the college period- 
icals, etc., He will associate freely 
with the entire student body, making 
its spirit his spirit and its aims his aims 
so long as they look to and are planned 
i for the advancement of his alma mater. 
At no time will he let special interests ; 
interfere with his duty to his college ; 
; particularly, he will so conduct him- 
self as a fraternity man as not to let 
his special fraternity interests interfere 
with the performance of a general 
college duty." 

The fraternities are able to carry out 
such resolutions to an exact degree. 
Every fraternity exerts an influence 
which has not been exorcised by any 
other form of college fellowship. In a 
letter to John O. Reed, Dean of the 
University of Michigan, R. Allen 
Stevens of Danville, III., a man ably 
qualified to discuss the fraternity ques- 
tion, writes: "The influence of the 
fraternity over its members is its 
largest source of power. In ordinary 
affairs the word or command to the 



marval of all students of fraternity life. 
When fraternities hold such standards 
of conduct toward the colleges an 
have such power to influence ai.d ad- 
herence to these ideals they must re- 
sult in a great benefit to their colleges. 
I will admit that I have become ac- 
quainted with instances in the past 
which a fraternity could be criticised 
for its action, but since I have been 
here to observe 1 have seen a good 
spirit between the fraternities. It is 
not perfect but we who are in college 
to-day succeed to a great extent in 
eliminating petty jealousies and per- 
sonal ambition and work for the greater 
good of M. A. C. The spirit this 
year has been excellent. Every one 
who attended the Springfield Training 
School game this fall saw there a uni- 
ted student body giving both on the 
field and on the side lines, its best 



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The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemuins 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



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LUNCHES 



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Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



effort to the college. The athletic 
elections this fall have been free from 
combinations and each man has won 
his election on his own merits alone. 
These are indicative for they come 
during the rushing season when each 
fraternity is working hard for candi- 
dates. 

A glance at the list of men holding 
offices in the various organizations and 
clubs is enough to contradict* the idea 
that fraternity men do not support the 
same. The candidates for fraternity 
membership ar^, selected because of 
their strength. i he strength of a col- 
lege man depends upon what he , 
accomplish- s In the college work. ! 
Instead of injuring these college organ- 
izations the fraternities do a great good 
in getting men interested in and carry- 
ing on such interests. 

The house oroblem is one to be 
solved and I believe with proper regu- 
lation which is sure to come, a solution 
will be found which will allow the 
building of fraternity houses and whicn 
will result in a benefit to tne col- 
lege. This solution needs the great- 
est study and the cooperation of Trus- 
tees, Faculty, Alumni and undergrad- 
uates to insure Its success. The 
fraternities are here to stay and 
exert a good wholesome influence on 
the college life. They can better the 
present system just as it has been 
strengthened in the past and no doubt 
will. The fraternity man will continue 
to work for the college along side of 
the non-fraternity man and together 
they will succeed in placing Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College among the 
leading agricultural institutions of the 

country. 

Arthur H. Sharpe Ml. 

THE ANNUAL INTERCLASS 
CROSS-COUNTRY 

In one of the best races ever run 
since the introduction of the interclass 
cross country, the Sophomore team 
carried off first honors with 75 points 
to their credit and a margin of 12 
points over their nearest competitors, 
the Seniors. The course, which was 
laid out between Sunderland and the 
East Experiment Station has been 
estimated to be about six and three- 
quarters miles in length. The race 
took place during the time set apart 
for assembly, Wednesday afternoon, 
Nov. 10 ; consequently, nearly every 
student took the opportunity to be 
present either at the finish or some- 
where along the course. 

Starting at 12-45 o'clock from Sun- 
derland, the runners soon separated 
into groups of twos and threes. Bar- 
row '1 1 was in the first group but soon 
began to draw away from the others 
and finally crossed the tape in front of 
the Experiment Station, just 37 min. 
26 sec. after the start. His running 
was easil> the feature. Besides lead- 
ing the field by over three hundred 
yards, he succeeded in clipping last 
year's time by about two minutes. 
The next men to appear were Dee '12 




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The College Signal, Tuesday, November 23, 1909. 



and Tower '12, with the former 
slightly in the lead. Tower made a 
brave effort to overtake his team-mate 
and failed by only a few inches. 
Fourth place went to Young '12 and 
fifth, to Caldwell '13. The next five 
in the order In which they finished 
were Dickinson '10, Cloues '10, 
Hutchings '12 and Cowles '10. Each 
class was represented by a team of 
five men with exception of the Fresh- 
men who, owing to an accident, had 
only four. 

Every man finished in good condi- 
tion. The following scores were 
made: Sophomores, 75; Senior, 63; 
Juniors 38 and Freshmen, 33. 

The victory of the Sophomore team 
brings with it 12 points toward the 
Interclass cup, which will be competed 
for in the spring. The Seniors are 
credited with 7 points and the Juniors, 
3. The showing made by the runners 
gives promise of some good work on 
the track this coming season. The 
track team management has an- 
nounced that, if everything goes 
smoothly, the portable running track 
will be set up by the end of the 
Thanksgiving recess. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Growth in attendance 1904— 1909 
For the past five years the growth in attendance has been 
a steady one. The following statistics represent this growth 
both in Numbers and Percentage: 



Knrolment of Students 
of College grade 

I98 

214 

228 



I 9O4-O5 
I 905-06 
I906-O7 
I9O7-08 
1 908-09 
1909-10 



252 
289 
350 

Total increase in numbers 
Total increase in percent 



Increase over previous year. 
In numbers 



16 

14 
24 

37 
61 



In percent. 

(approximate) 



8 

6.5 
10 

14.7 

21. 1 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



152 
76.6 



Amherst, Mass. 



KAPPA GAMMA PHI. 

Official announcement was made in 
chapei last Tuesday of the formation of 
a new secret society in college which 
will be known as the K T <t> fraternity. 
Its charter members are — of the Sen- 
iors, Hayward ; of the Juniors, John- 
son ; and of the Sophomores, O'Flynn, 
Dee, Bent, Gelinas, Curran, Muller, 
McGarr, Grey and Holland. The 
location of headquarters of the new 
fraternity has not as yet, been definitely 
fixed ; announcement of its where- 
abouts will be made later. K r * is 
the natural outcome of the enlarge- 
ment of the college ; and through its 
means the number of non-fraternity 
men and of those who are allied with 
fraternities will become more justly 
distributed. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Debating Club, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 
R. H. Allen, Manager 
G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 
R. S. Eddy. Manager 
L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 
H. W. Blaney, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 
R. H. Allen, President 
L. S. Dickinson, Mai.ager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 
H. W. French, President 
H. J. Baker, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



*\ 



AMHERST. MASS. 



NOTICE 

A Lost, Found and Want Column is 
to be added to the Signal and students 
may insert ads in that column at the 
rate of 10 cents per inch. This price 
includes only student ads. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



CARS 



MORSE ELECTED 

fContinued from first page.] 



both class and college affairs. During 
the past season, he has filled the posi- 
tion of assistant manager, and it was 
his work in that capacity, that prompted 
the team to elect him manager. 

FOUND— A fountain pen found on the 
campus. The same may be obtained at 
the Treasurer's Office, by identification. 



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Special Cars at Reasonable Kates 

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MANUFACTURERS of 



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SPRINGFIELD 
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All the News and the Truth 
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Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Tin COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



CD 



& 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 7, 1909. 



No. 1 1 



INFORMAL, DEG. 11. 



HOCKEY TEAM OUT 



Candidates Called Out. Prospects Good 
for a Past Team. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



J. A. Cutter '8a and Professor Waugh 
Discuss Fraternity Question. 



THE TRACK TEAM 



Dai/y$». Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



Candidates for the hockey team 
were called out last Tuesday afternoon 
and about twenty-five men reported. 
Of last year's team Brandt, Adams, 
Peckham, Sanctuary and Bently have 
returned and with some good material 
in the freshman class prospects are 
good for a fast team. Peckham, 
Sanctuary, Brandt, Bentley, Puffer, 
Sheehan, Heath, Brewer, Fowler, 
Williams, Reed, Goodnough and Little 
are out for the position of forward; 
Adams and Walker for cover point; 
Urban, Hickey and Moyer for point; 
and Ackerman, Nickerson and Steven- 
son for goal. 

Louis Brandt will captain the team 
again this year, and L. G. Schermer- 
horn will manage it. R. G. Nickerson 
Is assistant manager. Schermerhorn 
has arranged games with nine colleges 
so far and expects to close dates with 
others soon. The schedule to date is 
as follows : 

Dec. 11, Northampton Y. M. C. A. 
at Amherst. 

Jan. 8, Springfield at Amherst. 
Jan. 15, Williams at Williamstown. 
Jan. 21, Brown at Amherst. 
Jan. 22, Williams at Amherst. 
Jan. 29, Amherst at Amherst. 
Feb. 12, Trinity at Amherst. 
Feb. 19, Springfield at Springfield. 
Feb, 26, Brown at Providence. 
Daily practice is being held in the 
Drill Hall, consisting of puck shooting, 
goal defense, and scrimmage, after 
which th? men are given about 15 
laps on the track. 

Great interest is being shown in this 
sport and since basket- bail has been 
abolished here it seems that hockey 
ought to receive an appropriation lib- 
eral enough to place it on a strong 
footing. Intercollegiate hockey is 
steadily growing in favor in New Eng- 
land colleges, and deservedly, as it is 
a sport which is full of interest to both 
player and spectator. It is a strenu- 
ous game, requiring skill and endur- 
ance, yet is a sport entailing a mini- 
mum chance for injury. 

It is suggested that the Senate take 
action as soon as possible to make 
hockey a regular athletic contest be 
tween the sophomore and freshmen 
classes, the date of such contest to be 
set by the manager of the varsity 
team. This would increase interest 
in the sport and bring out more 
material. 



(Communications to the Signal concerning mat- 
ters of general Interest are welcomed. The Signal 
Is not to be held responsible for the opinions thus 
expressed.) 

To the Editor of the Signal: — 



ALUMNI BANQUET. 



Mr. Sharpe's article, in diction, good 
temper, and fraternity and college 
spirit arouses my admiration ; I hope 
your column will be kept open to other 
utterances; 1 would especially like to 
hear from the non-fraternity man In 
college and out of college and from the 
non-fraternity man who was initiated 
after graduation. 1 thought ten years 
ago 1 knew much of this subject; today 
1 admit I know but little but here are 
some features worth studying; Shall 
the fraternities be made junior socie- 
ties, initiating say twenty men from 
each class at the close of the sopho- 
more year, thus making them a quasi 
honor system, not necessarily of purely 
scholaristic rank, while the college 
body proper provides for tne discipline 
of the freshmen? Shall the fraterni- 
ties by an arbitrary arrangement initi- 
ate every man in college in groups 
thereby providing for all, the diciDline 
and fellowship now claimed for the 
fraternities housed in secret halls in 
one building to be erected, after the 
whole college has been taken care of 
in a splendid College Union Hall? 
Shall the present fraternity system be 
continued, thus initiating a minority of 
the college body, while the left overs 
go into one chapter of a fraternity to 
be formed in M. A C. and other col- 
leges; imagine a collection of non- 
fraternity graduates who have made 
good in life, getting together a suffic- 
ient sum of money by executive 
work, writing rituals breathing the 
highest sentiments of fraternity, 
providing in the organic law for 
thorough inspection and placing such 
an organization into half a dozen insti- 
tutions, with a clear understanding 
that the now established fraternities 
shall and must initiate eight or ten 
men each and that the remainder 
go into this one body; I am ot the 
opinion that such a fraternity of left- 
overs would not have a larger percent- 
age of "poor men" than the old line 
of ones ; this plan is no more chimer- 
cal than my pushing of my own fra- 
ternity in the weak days of M. A, C. 
into some of the best universities of 
the country and making possible and 

[Continued on page 4.] 



Track Prospects Good. 40 Men Report 
for Squad. 

With a squad of 40 men trying out 
on the boards and a most favorable 
schedule now nearly complete the 
prospectus of the track season is 
indeed a bright one. The manage- 
ment is very mnch pleased with the 
showing now being made by the men. 
Captain DlcKinson sees indications of 
some fine ability not only as relay 
men, but as dash and distance men. 
The prospects are for a fast relay 
team. 

The work up to the Christmas 
recess will consist of a liberal trying 
out accompanied by a couple of light 
cuts, then the remaining squad will be 
given general instruction as required, 
together with a certain amount of 
training to bring the men down to 
form. During the first week after the 
recess the squad will be cut to 12 or 
15 men and a careful and rigid train- 
ing insisted upon. 

Prominence will this year be given 
to the relay team, 600, 1000, and 
mile runs and the short dash. In 
Doctor Reynolds, our Physical Di- 
rector, we have a very able coach and 
a special effort will be made in train- 
ing the men best suited in the above 
lines of work. A good number of men 
have signified their intentions of being 
candidates in each of these events. 
Should conditions justify it, entries for 
the high jump and shot-put ( 16 lb.) 
will be made in the meets we are to 
enter. 

We ire in reality to make this 
season our debut in intercollegiate 
track athletics. Tnis fact together 
with limited finances have encum- 
bered somewhat the arrangement of a 
schedule. Following is its present 
status : 

Jan. 15, Interclass Meet. 
*Jan. 12, Amherst at Amherst. 
•Jan, 22, Amherst at M. A. C. 
Jan. 29, (Possibly; at Boston College. 

Feb. 12, B. A. A. Meet at Boston. 
♦Feb. 18, Armory Meet at Hartford. 
Feb. 22, Y. M. C. A. Meet at Troy. 
Mar. 12, Columbia at New York. 
*Mar. 19, Union at M. A. C. 

•Note— Date not settled. 

In the B. A. A. Meet our relay 
team will run against that of W. P. I. 
In the Hartford, Troy and New York 
meets our relay team will run but is 
as yet unmatched. 



New York Orads Have Rousing Time 
at St. Dennis Hotel. 



Last Friday night the "New York 
Aggies" held their annual alumni ban- 
quet at the St. Dennis Hotel. Sixty- 
six were present, men from almost 
every class. After tht necessary pre- 
liminaries, "the sheep and the goats," 
the odd and even classes, were separa- 
ted into two lines and marshalled Into 
the dining hall where one long table 
seated the company. Between cour- 
ses, the old songs were sung followed 
by the newer ones. The menu was 
an excellent one and seasoned so lib- 
erally with M. A. C. spirit that every- 
one cculd hot but feel that he was 
mor-^ than glad to be there. 

The inner man being satisfied, the 
club now waited for the speakers to do 
their part. President Lublin, the 
toast master of the evening first called 
on the chairman of ihe nominating 
committee, Mr. J. B. Minor 73, for 
his report and the following men were 
nominated and elected as officers of 
the New York Club for the ensuing 
year :- President, A. L, Fowler '80; 
vice-presidents, Dr. H. E. Chapin'81 ; 
W. A.Eaton '86; A. H. Sawyer '91 ; 
S. C. Bacon '03 ; F. A. Cutter '07 ; 
secretary, Dr. J. A. Cutter '82; treas- 
urer, W. L. Morse '95; choragus, S. 
D. Foot 78. 

The first speaker President Butter- 
field was then presented. The Presi- 
dent gave a summary of the year, told 
of the prospects for the future and 
described the aims and Ideals of our 
college. The vital point of his speech 
was related to the dormitory system. 
His question was "Shall we have 
dormitories, fraternity houses or some 
other system to house our student 

body?" 

The next speaker was M. F. Dick- 
inson who spoke in behalf of the trus- 
tees. He spoke of the work of the 
trustees, of their solidarity and of 
their devotion to M. A. C. The third 
and last speaker of the evening was Wil- 
liam H. Bowker who represented the 
alumni. Mr. Bowker talked of the 
college, its alumni and finished by giv- 
ing out a possible plan for housing our 
students. The plan was to build four- 
roomed bungalows, then forming these 
quadrangles and streets These cot- 
tages would be all built of concrete, 
and would not cost one third as much 
as dormitories. After the tables had 



[Continued on page B.J 



[Continued on page 8] 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 7, 1909. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 7, 1909. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910, Editor-in-Chief. 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. Asst. Editor. 

HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. College Notes. 

LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, Alumni Notes. 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, Department Notes. 

HERBERT W. BLANEY, 1911, College Notes. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Everyday at I to 1-15 P. M. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30, 
to 7-30 r. m. 
Manager— Tuesday. 6-30 to 7-30 r. H. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 1 a. m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. u. 
Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 u. 



mail has not been delivered and others 
when the delivery has been delayed 
two or three days. We need an office 
with individual boxes, a window for 
the sale of stamps and for the registry 
of letters and for money order busi- 
ness. The college can handle the 
business of 300 students and as the 
distance to the central office is a mile, 
a sub-station should be installed. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912, Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, DEC. 7. No. 11 



The reorganization of the College 
Union which is now In the hands of 
the senate is the reopening of an 
organization which has for its interest 
the social life of the student body. A 
program will be arranged of Saturday 
night entertainments and the commit- 
tee having this in charge has already 
secured sevaral engagements, which 
will be announced later. Last year's 
program included very successful 
entertainers and this year the course 
has been strengthened. The work of 
the Union cannot be overestimated 
since it provides for the association of 
the men where they have a common 
interest. 




-~ — . T- 



There has been some talk around 
college about the holding of a skating 
carnival and with the facilities we have 
here the project should be a successful 
one. Skating is a sport in which most 
of the students could join. The ser- 
vices of the band could be had and the 
pond decorated at a small expense. 
The carnivals at our neighboring insti- 
tutions are a great success and we 
should do well to coDy. 



With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4.00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 

Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 



JAMES F. PAGE. 



Dec. 



The name of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College seems to vary in 
many minds. We have seen tootball 
posters of the last season which display 
four difierent names, and newspaper 
accounts are of every day occurence 
which, even in the same article, show 
a diversity in regard to this. It would 
be well for those interested in the col- 
lege to endeavor to straighten this 
matter out and secure a universal use 
of the name "Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College." 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

8. — 11-15 p. m. Assebly, Dean 

Devenportof Urbana, 111. 
10.— 8-15 a. m. Pledging of 
new members to fraterni- 
ties. 

6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. in 
Chapel. Professor Charles 
Wellington. 

10. — 7-00 p. m. Senior play 
rehearsal. 

11. — 4-00 p. m. Informal in 
Armory. 

12.— 12-45 m. Bible Study 
classes. 
5-00 p. m. 
vice in 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Occulists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <£ SHOE 
REPAIRING 

AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

R. LEVI N E 

11 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



Thomas 
Boston. 

14._7-00 p. 
Club. 



Vesper Ser- 
Chapel. Rev. 
Van Ness of 



Playing Cards 



M- 



Stockbridge 



THURBER'S 

NKXT-TO l'OST-OFFlCK 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



The promptness and certainty which 
has characterized the work and man- 
agement of the track and hockey 
squads this past week is vety gratify- 
ing. The running-track was set up 
during the vacation and a call was 
made for candidates the day the col- 
lege reassembled. The same may be 
said of the hockey squad and, even 
though the pond is not safe, the men 
are getting into shape on the track and 
in the gymnasium. If this energy 
continues through the season these 
new sports will be well founded at M. 
A. C. 



The need of mail conveniences at 
the college is very imperative. The 
mail is brought up and simply placed 
in open boxes and receives many 
handlings in the course of a day. 
Many instances have occurred where 



COLLEGE NOTES 

At a recent meeting, the Freshman 
class chose for their colors maroon 
and white. 

Drs. C. P. Clinton and W. E. Brit- 
ton of the New Haven Agricultural 
Experiment Station inspected the divi- 
sions of botany and entomology last 
Thursday. 

The Junior promenade will be held 
Friday, Feb. 25,1910. Hardy's or- 
chestra of Worcester has been engaged. 
The Senior class plans to give a play 
the evening before the prom. Rehear- 
' sals have already begun. 

Some of the more prominent of the 
Wednesday assembly speakers for the 
winter term will be : Dean Eugene 
Davenport of Urban, 111., on Dec, 8 ; 
Dr. W. I. Chamberlain of Hudson, O., 
Jan. 26 ; Dr. Benjamin A. Trueblood 
of Boston, Feb. 9; Prof. John S. 
Bassett of Northampton. Feb. 16; 
Mrs. Mabel Loomis Todd of Amherst, 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



Congress Cards, all backs, 50c 

Bridge Cards, 50c and 25c 

500 Cards, 50 Pinochle, 25c 

Bicycle, Indicator and Squeezers, 

Each 25c 

Be sure and see the new Rud-Bridge 
Card, club linen and velour, 

Each 25c 

Bridge 500 Score Pads 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



Deuel's Drug Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



Feb. 23 ; Dr. Winfield Ayres. March 
16. 

The series of Sunday talks which 
have been running Sunday mornings 
has been completed and in place of 
these meetings vesper services will be 
held each Sunday afternoon at 5 
o'clock. The following speakers have 
been secured: Dec. 5, Dr. Samuel 
A. Eliot of Boston; 12, Rev. Thomas 
Van Ness of Boston; Jan. 9, Bishop 
Alexander H. Vinton of Springfield; 
16, Rev. Dr. Philip S. Moxom of 
Springfield; 23, Rev. Herbert J. 
White of Hartford; Feb. 13, Rev. 
Charles F. Carter of Lexington; 20, 
Rev. Charles S. MacFarland of South 
Norwalk, Conn. ; 27, Rev. Albert P. 
Fitch of Cambridge; March 6, Rev. 
A. P. Reccord of Springfield; 13. 
Rev. C. W. Merriam of Greenfield ; 
20, Rev. James De Normandie of 
Boston. 



Ex-'12.— E. V. Durling has been 
playing during the foot-ball season as 
guard for Wesleyan. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. -ELDER 



Folsom '10 



Nickless 'io 



Aggie 



Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers ' 1 2 



LAST WEDNESDAY'S MASS 
MEETING. 

The regular assembly hour last Wed- 
nesday was given over to the students, 
by request of the College Senate, and 
a largely attended mass-meeting was 
held. 

President Leonard of the Senate 
presided. He said that the meeting 
had been called in order to acquaint 
the student body with the plans of the 
Senate in regard to the College Social 
Union. He said that since the organ- 
ization had no constitution or officers 
as yet, it had been turned over to the 
Senate. This body had in turn ap- 
pointed a committee to draw up a con- 
stitution and take charge until officers 
could be elected. It is the purpose of 
the committee to arrange some enter- 
tainment, whenever possible, for Sat- 
urday evenings during the year. 

Other plans which the committee 
has underway are : the filing of Spring- 
field and Boston papers in the Union 
room each day; the fitting up of the 
trophy room so that it may also be 
used for study purposes ; the furnishing 
of the new game room with card and 
pool tables ; and the addition of new 
furniture In all of the rooms under the 
control of the organization. President 
Leonard urged the whole student body 
to cooperate with the committee in the 
work. 

The next speaker was Louis Brandt 
'10, who, as chairman of the commit- 
tee recently appointed to look into the 
advisability of founding a literary mag- 
azine at M. A. C. presented the mat- 
ter to the students by reading an ex- 
cellent paper in favor of such a move, 
by Professor Neal. In the discussion 
that followed, Oftrolenk Ml gave 
statistics to show the probable cost of 
such a periodical. He said that if 
three hundred students would buy a 
copy each month, to say nothing of 
members of the alumni who had al- 
read pledged their support, the finan- 
cial part of the business could be easily 
and successfully met. The question 
was then put to those present as to how 
many would lend their support to the 
project and a large majority resDonded. 
The meeting was brought to a close 
by a plea from Manager Schermer- 
horn of the hockey team against 
throwing sticks and stones and other- 
wise damaging the Ice on the pond. 



ft $7. PEN 

FREE 

For the Best answer to the 
question 

Why is a CROCKER 
SELF - FILLINQ 
Fountain Pen more de- 
sirable than the old style 
pens that fill with the 
medicine dropper ? 

Answers must not contain 
more than twenty five words. 

Answers to be sent in not 
later than Dec. 15, 1909. 




Send all answers to 



E. E. MILLETT 



AMHERST, MASS. 



GLEE CLUB SELECTED. 

At the trial of voices Nov. 17, 
a glee club of twenty-one members 
was selected and is as follows: — 
First tenors; P. A. Racicot '1 1, of 
Lowell, L. N. Pease '13, of Meritien, 
Conn., H H. Jenney '13, of Boston, 
G. S. Zabriskie '13, of Rutherford, 
N. J., D. F. Baker '13, of New Bed- 
ford: second tenors; L. C. Brandt 
'10, of Everett, F. A. Prouty ' I I , of 
Worcester, F. B. Hills of Bernard- 
ston, J. D. French '13, of Hyde 
Park, F. D. Griggs '13. of Chicopee 
Falls, J. B. Cobb '13, of Chicopee 
; Falls: first bass; P. W. Allen '11, of 
Westfield (leader), L. S. McLaine 
'10, of New York, H. F. Willard '1 1, 
!of Leominster, A. C. Brett '12, of 
; North Abington, H. C. Walker '12, 
of Marlboro : second bass ; E. L. Winn 
j Ml of Holden, G. W. Ells M2 of 
Cambridge, L. E. Gelinas '12, of 
North Adams, F. J. Clegg '13 of 
Fall River, Barstow of Hadley. 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CIOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST UUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



Stable manure, as a by-product of the farm, will be a favorite 
source of fertility, partly because <.f its plant food and chiefly because 
of the humus it supplies, but in market Hardening and in general farm 
practice tlie best results will be obtained when it is used la connection 
with chemical manures. On the other hand, chemical manures not only 
jn a concentrated way needed plant food, but supply it in forml that 
anticipate, supplement and in some cases promote bacterial action, with- 
out which stable manure, and even the organic portion of the fertilizer, 
would be barren in results. The progressive farmer, theiefon, supple- 
ments and improves his stable manure by the use of concentiatcd fer- 
tilizers in the same way that he supplements and improves his bay with 
the use of concentrated grain foods in feeding bis stock. 

Study the plant food problem 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAn ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum. ar\d High Streets, 



Hartford, Coi\r\. 



j 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Jiushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkr S. Garde. 



C&rptrvter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 7, 1909- 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - V.Wo 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - » -5 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - >» • 

Black unfinished. 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - *J- 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. J9-^ 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - J9- 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting. 3 1-2 yds. - ' «, co ner vard 

Rain Cloth, - $3.50 per yd. Trouserings, - $3.50 per yard. 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

[Continued from first page.] 



A. P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 



N 



probable the taking over of the frater- 
nities now local by national fraternities. 
In all stages of this argument, the 
obligation of the college to the non- 
fraternity men must be considered; I 
hope some day to welcome Mr. Sharpe 
with the right hand of fellowship at a 
Massachusetts Aggie reunion in New 
York, but he must show me more, 
e'er I concede that the best interests 
are to be promoted by an aristocracy 
of collegians living in fraternity houses, 
rather than by democracy habiting the 
dormitories on the campus. 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82. 




Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

(T^= Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
witb a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M. D. OILMAN. C. A. MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Stkeet. 

Worcester, Mass. 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
25 *' dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3d. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25Cts. 

25 " Broken Bank and Confederate 

Bills $1.00 

8en.t for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars ami 

Selling price Hat. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Nunilnmutist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST, BOSTON. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



To the Editor of the Signal : 

The fraternity question is a large 
one, and It will be a long time before 
the last word on it is said. In fact 
one would be obliged to write a whole 
book in order to discuss fairly the 
many points involved. The discussion 
proceeds under one special disadvan- 
tage, namely that, while the defects of 
the fraternity system are perfectly 
obvious to the whole world, the big 
advantages are felt only by those on 
the inside. Even the body of frater- 
nity undergraduates only half realize 
these substantial advantages, just as 
they underestimate many of the other 
best influences In college life. 

For myself I was brought up in a 
non-fraternity college, and am still, in 
pure theory, opposed to the fraternity 
system, and especially in state institu- 
tions. However, having become 
acquainted with the intimate workings 
of one great national fraternity, and 
having taken the pains to learn about 
other fraternities in several other insti- 
tutions, I am compelled to relinquish 
my theoretical objections in favor of 
the unimpeachable fact that the frater- 
nities are a powerful influence for good 
in most circumstances. 

Of course there are good fraternities 
and bad ones, strong ones and weak,— 
and even if some fraternity does go 
wrong it no more proves the failure of 
the system than an occasional divorce 
proves that matrimony is iniquitous. 
Outsiders, including undergraduates, 
commonly fail to recognize this very 
great difference amongst fraternities. 
' Admittedly the great value of the 
fraternity comes to its members, espe- 
cially the undergraduates. Though 
these advantages have not been suffi- 
ciently dwelt upon, nor sufficiently 
developed in practice, I must pass 
them over here in order to speak of 
the important advantages which a 
sound fraternity system offers to the 
college management, and especially to 
the faculty. A good many faculty 
men are learning that the fraternities 
may easily be a very great aid in dis- 
cipline and in the promotion of high 
ideals and a good "spirit." The fra- 
ternity under wise management (which 
is the rule) does not generate a clique 
spirit opposed to college government 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, S400, $5-°°- 

E. M. BOLLBS 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



*E. N. PARISEAU,^ 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receire 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 

Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December, 7, 1909. 




THOMPSON 



H. WARREN 
A SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 



Sporting Goods 

Store and 

Repair Shop. 



Don't strain your 
eyes by using a kero- 
sene lamp or an elec- 
tric lamp hung in the 
center of the room. 

Call and see our 
full line of Portable 
Electric Lamps at 
$2.50 up. 

3 handsome Read- 
ing Lamps at a very 
low price. 

Coat and vest pock- 
et lights. All prices. 

Batteries and El- 
ectrical Novelties. 



tfA^e 



E. A. Thompson 



Rear of First Nat. Bank. 



and college loyalty, but fosters ideas 
of an exactly opposite nature. I 
recently heard a fraternity leader 
coaching his mates. He said: "Look 
here, fellows; there's a lot of bad talk 
going around the campus about such 
and such a matter. Don't any of you 
fellows take any part in it, and when- j 
ever you get a chance, you kill ill": 
No member of the faculty could have 
done anything so effective nor better! 
in spirit. 

I think we may fairly emphasize the 
value, both disciplinary and educa- 
tional, of the steadying effect of the 
fraternity on undergraduate life, espe- 
cially in its influence on lower class- 
men. This steadying effect is secured 
in several ways: 

1. There is the influence of high 
ideals, systematically inculcated by all 
fraternities. 

2. There is the reputation of the 
fraternity to be maintained at any per- 
sonal sacrifice. 

3. There is the pressure of great 
personal responsibility toward fraterrtty 
brothers. 

4. There is the Influence of upper 
classmen, exercised more wisely and 
more efficiently within the fraternities 
than anywhere else in the realm of 
college life. 

5. There is the influence of the 
alumni. 

6. There is the influence of in- 
structors and professors who are mem- 
bers, and who can reach a footing of 
complete understanding wth students 
inside the fraternity which exists 
nowhere else. 

7. In national fraternities there is 
the powerful influence of the central 
organization, always composed of lead- 
ers and representing the highest ideals 
of college honor, college traditions, 
and college service. 

In fact the only fraternity question 
is the one already pointed out by your 
correspondents. It is not what to do 
with the fraternities, but what to do 
with the men outside the fraternities. 
This is truly a sericus question, for 
such men are obviously missing one of 
the great benefits of college life, and 
one to which they are often just as 
fairly entitled as those who have the 
will and the opportunity to join the 
fraternity of their choice. 

F. A. Waugh. 

FOOTBALL COACHES FOR NEXT 
YEAR 

"A Winning Team," the slogan for 
next year's football season. 

This was the cry of the men of the 
New York Alumni club at their ban- 
quet. "More spirit, more fight, and 
a winning team is what we must have 
and I am coming up to help coach that 
team next year." So said the follow- 
ing men: C. L. Rice '01, J. S. 
Eaton '98, C. L. Whitaker '05, A. J. 
Farley and J. A. Anderson '08, F. 
A. Cutter '07. 

Editor's Note— We have all the 
bone-fide signatures of these men and 
would like some more good football 
names. These men to help a head 
coach some time during the season 
would be the best sort of help for a 
wiuning team. 



T. Iv. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 
Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE! 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Pressor, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Beat Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Kent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishing!, 

Come Marly and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance 

Store 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

'The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

(lass Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



We dding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS, 17th STRFET A LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 









The College Signal, Tuesday, December 7, 1909. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 




C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



.•.'/.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.'.•.•.•.•.•.■.■.•••.••••••••••'•'.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



UNION ENTERTAINMENT 

At the first union entertainment 
Saturday night Leo Nabakoff of New 
York city gave an illustrated lecture 
on the past and present conditions of 
Russia. He started at the beginning 
of Russia's history and told of her 
growth and development into the 
empire of today, giving, as he went 
on, many short sketches of the lives of 
the men who through their efforts 
brought Russia up from barbarism. 
By his slides he showed the cosmopoli- 
tan character of the natives of the 
country. At the close of Mr. Nabakoff 
answered many questions on the con- 
ditions surrounding the serf not only 
during the present time but those under 
which he existed before he was freed, 
in name only, by the great white 
Father. He also answered questions 
concerning the student life in the 
Russian universities and explained the 
grading of schools as compared with 
ours. 

The attendance was excellent and 
the management of the Union feel 
encouraged in their efforts to obtain 
the best of attractions tnat the enter- 
tainments may obtain the great success 
that they had last year. 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Mlock, Amhkkst, M 
Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



STEAM FITTING, 1.1. phone 50-4. 

GAS FIT I IMi. TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 

Memorial Windows, 

Lead LIGHTS, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



E.B. DICKINSON D. D S 

DBNTAL ROOM8 

Williams Block, Amhkkst, INI ass. 

OvtH F. Hoiks: 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



BEST FARM IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, bath room, 
hot and cold water; best farm in this 
section, running spring water; 40 acres 
tillage, 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber: plenty of fruit and many other good 
features. $6000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 

W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST. MASS. 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



THANKSGIVING DAY AT THE 
COLLEGE 

Those students that stayed around 
college during the Thanksgiving recess 
and a number of the faculty with their 
families enjoyed a very bountiful 
Thanksgiving dinner, served by Mrs. 
Rowe at the dining hall. The tables 
were made attractive by bouquets of 
white chrysanthemums and potted 
plants; in the centre of the hall was a 
table for the children, with the studf ntr. 
and the faculty on either side. The 
menu was that of the old New England 
Thanksgiving dinner. 

MENU. 

Tomato Soup Celery 

Roast Beef 

Brown Mashed Potatoes Apple Fritters 

Roast Vermont Turkey 

Cranberry Sauce Sweet and White Potatoes 

Onions Squash 

Venison Pie 

Pickled Beets 

Hot Rolls 

Mince Pie Squash Pie 

Plum Pudding 

Assorted Cake 

Vanilla Ice Cream 

Crackers Cheese 

Black Coffee 

Fruit Raisins Figs 

Mixed Nuts 
After dinner everybody gathered in 
the Social Union Room and had an 
informal good time, playing games, 
dancing and closing with songs. In 
the evening there were several card 
and theatre parties. 



at the rate of 1 to 12. Six spraying 
outfits were used Including the Har- 
die, Goulds Spramotos, Arlington and 
Empire and some very good spraying 
was done thoroughly ; in some cases 
(owing to accidents) it Included the 
men as well as the trees. 

FLORICULTURE. 

The Floriculture d^partm-nt has 
recently purchased 75 distinct varieties 
of ferns from Henry A. Dreer of 
Philadelphia. 

Steam from the heating plant has 
been connected with the Durfee Range 
to take the place of the old hot water 
system. 

landscape gardening. 

The collection of Copley prints, 
representing landscapes painted mostly 
by modern American painters, lately 
added to the equipment of the depart- 
ment, is now on exhibition in Wilder 
Hall and the public is invited to look 
them over. They are being used for 
special study by the class in the theory 
of art. 

Prof-ssor Waugh has arranged wth 
Professor Churchill of Smith College 
to use the collection of paintings owned 
by that college for the special study of 
the class in Landscape Gardening 5. 
The class spent an afternoon in the 
Smith Art Gallery last week for this 
purpose. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 

The junior class in Practical Pomol- 
ogy have finished the pruning in the 
old Owen Orchard and on Thursday 
afternoon sprayed the trees with solu- 
ble oil for the San Jose scale using it 



AGrlCULTURE. 

At a meeting under the auspices of 
the State Grange, held at Lowell, 
Nov, 12th, Prof. W. P. B. Lockwood 
spoke on "The care of milk in the 
home and justice to the producer." 

botany. 

Prof. L. R. Jones of the University 
of V-rmont recently spent a day 
examining the equipment of Clark 
Hall. 

Prof. W. P. Brooks was sent to 
attend a banquet cf the Western 
Alumni Association, Dec. 4, in Chi- 
cago, III. 

experiment station. 

J. F. Morrell, who for the last two 
years has been assistant chemist in the 
Maine Experiment Station, has been 
engaged as assistant chemist, to take 
the place made vacant by the resigna- 
tion of P. V. Goldsmith. Mr. Gold- 
smith left this station Nov. 15th, and 
is now on his way to Cuba. This 
department is busy at the present time 
preparing its annual reports, as well as 
its fertilizer and feed bulletins. 

Zoological. 

James A. Hyslop, '08, has pre- 
sented to the Zoological museum, sev- 
eral very fine specimens — one Pacific 
Water Lizard, one Western Garden 
Toad, one Skeleton Skunk, and one 
Western Horned Toad. These 
species were collected by Mr. Hyslop 
in Washington. These are valuable 
[and interesting specimens, and illus- 
; trate the Fauna of the western part of 
1 the country. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 7, 1909. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 
Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

The assembly on Wednesday Nov. 1 7 
was treated to one of the choicest bits 
of literature ever read In our Chapel, in 
Mr. George Cable's address on the 
Gardens of New Orleans. The rea- 
son why the people of New Orleans 
have better gardens than we do is due 
is due to their different temperament. 
They are not always "stepping lively," 
but take things in a leisurely manner. 
On their estates a closely shaven lawn 
is not highly valued and they are not 
slaves to the hwn-mower ; they have 
not done away witn fences, but have 
hidden them witn ornamental shrubs 
and one ndy bit at his j ,ase in his 
yard without being subject to the pub- 
lic gaze. Even common gardeners 
know the botanical names of the plants 
and they ready take interest in their 
work. Mr. Cable thinks it would be 
our advantage to adopt some of their 
methods here In tne north and to think 
less of business and more of beauty. 

RUSHING RULES. 

The following ruies are Uid dow.i by 
the Fraternity conference in regard to 
rushing and pledging new men : 

No candidate for fraternity member- 
ship shall bespoken to about, or shown 
literature pertaining to, or approachea 
in any manner whatsoever in regard to 
fraternities or fraternity membership 
until after the chapel exercises on the 
second Tuesday morning alter the 
Thanksgiving recess. 

No candidate for fraternity member- 
ship shall be spoken to about, or snown 
literature pertaining to, or approached 
in any manner whatsoever in regard to 
fraternities or fraternity membership 
after six o'clock p. m., Thursday of the 
same week, and no fraternity man 
shall be with him from that time until 
after chapel of the following morning. 
The wearing of fraternity pin, or 
pledge emblem by a candidate shall 
signify that the bearer is pledged to 
that fraternity, an^ that the pin, or 
pledge emblem shall be voluntarily put 
on by the candidate himself during the 
chapel exercises the following morn- 
ing. (Any verbal or written promise 
shall not be valid). 

No candidate shall be taken out of 
town during the above mentioned 
"working" season, and no fraternity 
man shall associate with such candi- 
date while out of town d-iring the afore- 
said season. 

No prepared spread, banquet, enter- 
tainment, etc., shall be given to a 
candidate by any fraternity or group of 
fraternity men during the "working" 
season, and no fraternity or group of 
fraternity men shall give a prepared 
entertainment, spread or banquet prior 
to the "working" season. 

If a candidate is not pledged at this 
time he is not eligible for membership 
to any fraternity until May first of the 
same year, except by special arrange- 
ment of the Fraternity Conference. 

Special students shall not be consid- 
ered eligible candidates for fraternity 
membership. 

The rushing shall be done by under- 
graduates of this Institution only. 

It is strongly urged that these rules 
be strictly adheredto, as by that means 
only can the fraternity spirit of the col- 
lege remain good. 




THE H. L FROST & BARRETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 

SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 

At tlu- Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 18-24, 1909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, ( Basic Slag Phosphate) t<><>k Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Four 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by Mr. 
George A. Drew, of Connecticut. M. A. C Class 
of 1897, (Our pamphlet " Up To Date Fruit prow- 
ing" is sent free if you mention The College Signal.) 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

We also distribute from Botton, Maat- Belfast, Mc, Baltimore, 
Md.. Wilmington, N.<\, Savannah, <..».. and < barlestoa, S.C. 

ijr\l 1 ITI.A\ciqamx.tk» 
ft 20 for* 15 c-ts. O 




Football game. Tie score. Goal kicked from the field. 
You see your college colors waving wildly about the stand. 
Makes the heart jump. 

Then you settle back in your seat and enjoy a F^i™ 
Cigarette. The mild fragrance and flavor just fill the bill. 
The delicious blend of Turkish tobacco makes you glad 
you're living. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 

I 















The College Signal, Tuesday, December 7, 1909. 



THE TRACK TEAM 

[Continued from first page.] 

The management has in mind that 
in entering the above noted meets we 
will come very much before the public 
as entering into intercollegiate track 
athletics. If our men do well, and 
they certainly have the ability to do so, 
we will have gained a disseminated 
reputation which will be of mutual 
benefit to the Track Association inter- 
ests of this college and to the college 
itself. We must win success, the 
men feel this responsibility and the 
spirit is that we are going to go get it. 

ALUMNI BANQUET 

I Continued from first page.] 

been taken away the men gathered 
around the piano and sang and a gen- 
eral informal time was had until shortly 
after midnight. Then once again ola 
friends had to part vowing to each 
other to meet there next year. Those 
present were : 

A. W. Lublin '84, president and 
toastmaster; Kenyon L. Butterfield, 
President of M. A. C. ; Charles A. 
Gleason, Trustee ; M. F. Dickinson, 
Trustee; Dr. Edward Wallace Lee; 
George F. Mills, Dean M. A. C. ; 
Frank A. Waugh, Prof. M. A. C. 

'71.— William H. Bowker. Trustee. 

72.— W. D. Russell. Daniel P. Cole. F. A 
Ober. F. W. Morris. S. C. Thompson. 

73.— Charles Wellington. John B. Minor. 
J. H. Webb. 

'75.— Dr. John M. Benedict. Dr. John F. 
Winch. J. F. Barrett. 

76— Dr. J. E. Root. 

78 — S. D. Foot. Charles E. Lyman. Dr. 
John Washburn. 

'81— Dr. H. E. Chapln. 

'82.— C. E. Beach. Dr. John A. Cutter. 
Jas. S. Williams. 

]83.— Dr. H. J. Wheeler. A. A. Hevia. 

'84. — E. A. Jones. 

'85.— H. Howell. 

'86.— Benoni Tekirian, Dr. Winfield 
Ayres. W. A. Eaton. O. H. Ateshian. 

'87.— W. H. Caldwell. 

'91.— C. A. Magill. M. A. Carpenter. W. 
W. Gay. A. H. Sawyer. 

'93— F. H. Henderson. 

'95.— F. C. Tobey. H. W. Lewis. W. L. 
M.orse^ 

'97.— G. A Drew. C. D. Leavens. 

'98.— E. S. Eaton. 

'01.— C. L. Rice. 

•02.— F. H. Plumb. 

'03.— S. C. Bacon. 

'04.— M. A. Blake. C. E. Elwood. S. B. 
Haskell. 

'05.— F. A. Bartlett. C. L. Whittaker. 

'06.— F. C. Pray. 

'07.— F. A. Cutter. Jas. H. Walker. A. T. 
Anderson. 

'08.— W. J. Coleman P. A. Davis, A.J. 
Farley. D. P. Miller. 

"09.— M. T. Smulyan. 

•10— J. P. Blaney, W. R. Clarke. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Growth in attendance 1904 — 1909 
For the past five years the growth in attendance has been 
a steady one. The following statistics represent this growth 
both in Numbers and Percentage: 



Enrolment of Students 
of College grade 




Increase over previous year. 
In numbers 


In percent, 
(approximate) 


I904-O5 


198 










1905-06 


214 






16 


8 


1 906-07 


228 






14 


6-5 


1907-08 


252 






*4 


10 


I908-O9 


289 






37 


14.7 


' I9O9-IO 


350 






61 


21. 1 


Total 


increase 


in 


numbers 


152 




Total 


increase in 


percent 


76.6 





Allen Bros. 



Contractors & Builders. 



Painting, 



Electrical Work. 



The College Senate, 
Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Debating Club, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

R. H. Allen, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 

H. W. French, President 

H. J. Baker, President 



Eleven Index, 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



WANTED.— One '08 Index, in good con- 
dition, to complete set. If an extra copy of 
the issue is at hand please communicate 
with Roger S. Eddy. 116 Pleasant St.. 
Amherst. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving G. Davis, Agent 12 North 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



Amherst, Mass. 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



Leave AQUIK COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AQQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rates 

UKI ! UDERLAND ST. BY. CO. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COl EIGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 14, 1909. 



No. 12 



1911 INDEX TOMORROW 



HOCKEY SEASON OPENS 



Practice Game with Northampton Y. M. 
C. A. a 2 to 1 Victory for M. A. C. 



DEAN DAVENPORT 

Addresses Assembly on "Conditions in 
Agricultural Education". 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



In a rather slow and uninteresting 
game, our hockey team opened the 
season last Saturday afternoon with a 
victory over the Northampton Y. M. 
C. A. The weather conditions were 
hardly ideal for hockey. The ice on 
the rink was fairly good. Owing to 
the absence of one of the visiting 
team, the game was somewhat 
delayed, but this difficulty was over- 
come when, by agreement of the two 
captains, Hickey '12 went in at point 
for the Y. M. C. A. 

Referee Dr. Reynolds blew the 
whistle for the beginning of the game 
about half past three. Our men, 
under the leadership of Captain Brandt, 
soon had the puck in our opponents' 
territory and succeeded in keeping it 
there for the greater share of the time. 
As the half progressed, the passing 
and teamwork of both sides improved 
steadily. Captain Brandt and Peck- 
ham did some clever shooting but 
missed the goal by the narrowest of 
margins. 

We were the first to score. The 
half was about half over when a series 
of neat passes gave Brandt the puck 
just in front of Northampton's goal. 
A moment later he had shot it fairly 
between the posts. As the play con- 
tinued, the blocking became faster and 
harder. However, just before the half 
closed, Peckham managed to elude 
his man long enough for a pretty shot 
which resulted in our second and last 
goal. 

The second half opened with Brewer 
replacing Bentley at right wing and 
Nickerson in Ackerman's place at 
goal. Play was much the same as in 
the first period but our men seemed 
content to play a defensive rather than 
an aggressive game. On the other 
hand, the Northampton men frequently 
cartied the puck into our territory, 
only to lose it through the excellent 
playing of our backfield. Day and 
Captain Warner were the most con- 
spicuous of the visitors and through 
their efforts our men were kept busily 
on the guard. At last the former suc- 
ceeded in breaking a way for a shot 
and scored the only goal of the half for 
his team. 

The showing made by our men was 
very good considering the short time 
the practice has been possible. How- 

iContinued on page 5.] 



SHORT COURSES 

Largely Increased Offerings. The New 
Poultry Course. 



CALL FOR COLLEGE MEN 



Last Wednesday Dean Eugene 
D?venport of the University of Illinois, 
addressed the Assembly on "Condi- 
tions Surrounding Us in Agicultural 
Education." 

"A college man," said Mr. Daven- 
port, "has always been considered 
more or less of a leader in his sphere. 
For a long time he was practically the 
only educated man in his community. 
But men are getting a more liberal 
education than formerly, the college 
man works side by side with the non- 
coliegian, and is judged by the stand- 
ard which the educated non-collegt- 
man has set up. The future of col 
leges depends on their coming up tO< 
this standard which is a standard of 
ability. The question now asked of a 
college man is not, "What is his 
pr paraxon? " but, "What is his ca- 
pacity and inclination for work? " 

"For every dollar spent by an agri 
cultural college student toward his 
education, the state expends another. 
Agricultural colleges are public invest- 
ments of the state, and the state has 
the right to demana much from gradu- 
ates of such institutions. 

"The present is only an important 
link between the past and the future, 
and a man is judged by the ability with 
which he forges that link. There is 
no such thing as a college boy. As 
soon as a boy decides to go to college 
he is a man. A man in college must 
be a man and meet conditions as a 
man. A person is outside of college 
exactly what he is in college." 

He continued, "Show the West 
that New England's abandoned farms 
are a myth; show them that there is 
an agriculture here in the East. 
Right here in New England you are 
near the greatest centers of the coun- 
try. Your domination of manufacturing 
depends on your agriculture; on the 
question of your ability to provide food 
cheaply for mill- workers. Develop 
good agriculture and so develop for 
New England manufacturing even 
greater than that now being carried on. 



Great Opportur ities for Agricultural 
College Men. 



Wednesday evening Dean Daven- 
port addressed the Stockbridge club 
on "Cooperation in Agriculture," He 
dwelt largely on results of farmer's 
cooperative associations in the West 
and the necessity for their growth in- 
troduction in the East. 



The ten weeks short course, under 
the direction of Prof. Hurd. opens 
the Tuesday after the Christmas recess. 
The courses of study are planned so as 
to bring before the student the results 
of the latent investigations in the agri- 
cultural sciences. Instruction wiil be 
given by the regular faculty of the col- 
lege by means of lectures, recitations, 
laboratory and practicum work. Al- 
reiay the registration in the dairy 
course has reached the limit and as a 
whole the winter courses seems to be 
more popular this year than before. 
Courses in general agriculture, market 
gardening, dairying, together with 
their allied courses, will be given. 
Also several lectures will be given 
throughout the course of subjects that 
are intended to instruct in some topics 
of vital interest to rural communities, 
such as rural sociology and rural eco- 
nomics. 

A very practical poultry course will 
open Feb. 28 and will include poultry 
house construction, raising of poultry 
and the marketing of the products. A 
descriptive circular will be ready about 
Jan. 1, 1910. 

The college has recently come into 
possession of a number of swarms of 
bees, which, with the other equipment 
to oe added, will afford a fine opportu- 
nity for those interested to get some 
practical information on this subject. 
For those people that can not attend 
the courses at the college, correspon- 
dence/ courses have been arranged 
which are designed to meet the needs 
of farmers, market-gardeners, fruit 
growers, floriculturists, and teachers. 
The lessons are sent out one at a time 
accompanied by a list of questions and 
when these are satisfactorily answered 
the next lesson is sent. There are 
about fifteen already enrolled in the 
correspondence courses. 

Another department of the winter 
school is that of lecture courses. 
These are given by the different mem- 
bers of the faculty and may be ob- 
tained by all kinds of agricultural or- 
ganizations and others that are inter- 
ested In problems pertaining to agri- 
culture and country life. 



Sunday vespers on Dec. 12 were 
conducted by Rev. A. P. Reccord of 
Springfield. Miss Helen M. Wells of 
Northampton was the soloist. 



I feel quite sure that our undergrad- 
uates do not appreciate the rapidly 
increasing demands for men who are 
thoroughly trained along agricultural 
lines. The United States Department 
of Agriculture and various agricultural 
colleges and agricultural experiment 
stations, and private business enter- 
prises as well, are not able to get the 
men they need. Among other things, 
I think the following reasons may be 
an explanation : 

First, some ot our men are really 
misled by the salary question. That 
is, some of them would prefer a $1200 
salary in any kind of a job that shows 
its If, rather than take $800 in a line 
of work that is really a necessary 
apprenticeship for efficiency In some 
line of agricultural work. 

Again, a good many of our men are 
unwilling to take the time necessary 
for thorough preparation. Oftentimes 
graduate work of a year or three years 
in length is absolutely necessary for 
the proper preparation. Naturally 
young men are anxious to get to work 

or to get married— and sometimes 

even good men fail to see the neces- 
sity of thorough training until it is too 
late. 

Furthermore, some men are misled, 
I think, by the small salaries that are 
sometimes paid for work connected 
with agricultural institutions. Of 
course not everybody can be at the 
top, but in the main it is safe to say 
that the money rewards for high grade 
work are not to be despised. In other 
words, only the very best men should 
pr-pare for these high grade lines of 
work. Second-rate men cannot suc- 
ceed in these as a rule. 

Another difficulty is that some other- 
wise good man have not yet caught 
the spirit of social service. The Idea 
of a large income looks more tempting 
than the opportunity for work that is 
useful to one's fellow men. One can- 
not in these days ignore the question 
of salary, but such is the demand for 
men that I think that the question of 
; salary may be practically Ignored. If 
a man does strong work in these voca- 
tional lines of agriculture, he is almost 
sure ultimately to have a salary that 
will enable him to keep up a good 
standard of living, and hold his head 
up among his fellows. 






[Continued on p»c« ♦•! 






I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 14, i9°9- 



T HE COL LEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor-ln-Chlef. 

Asst. Editor. 

College Notei. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 



WALTER R.CLARKE, 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOS1AH C. FOLSOM. 1910. 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 191 1, Collee* Notes. 
News editor of this issue, JOS1AH C. FOLSOM 1 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. m. 

Tuesday. Thursday and Fridays from 0-30 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday. 6-30 10 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9-15 to 10 a. m. and 6-30 to 

7 r. M. 
Thursday I 1-15 to 12 M. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY, DEC 14. No. 12 



Because of the Christmas recess 
the issue for Jan. 4, 1010, will be 
omitted. The next issue will 
that of Jan. 11. 



be 



Dec. 



Dec. 



Dec. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Stockbridge 



Assembly in 



Dec. 

1910. 
Jan. 

Jan. 



Jan. 



Jan. 



Jan. 



Jan. 



Jan. 



14—7-00 p. M. 

Club Debate. 
15—1-15 p. m 

Chapel. 

7-00 p. M. Debating Club. 
16 — Y. M. C. A. 6-45 p. m. in 

Chapel. President K. L. 

Butterfield. 
17 — 6 00 p. m. Christmas recess 

begins. 



3 — 1-00 p. m. Christmas recess 
ends Assembly in Chapel. 
4. — 7-00 p. m. Stockbridge club. 
Paper by Oertel '10. Subject: 
Electricity on the Farm. 
Senior Play rehearsal. 
5 — i-i5 p. m. Student Mass 
Meeting in Chapel. 
7-00 p. m. Debating Club. 
6_6-45 P. M. Y. M. C. A. in 
Chapel. Leader, H.J. Baker 

'11. 

7 — 7.00 p. m. Senior Class 

Play Rehearsal. 
8 — Hockey on pond. M. A. C. 

vs. S. T. S. 

9 — 5-00 p. m 



The gymnasium apparatus is being 
set up again in the Drill Hall and the 
regular gym work will start immediate- 
ly after the Christmas vacation. Dr. 
Reynolds has several men out every 
afternoon and is getting up a practice 
class of seniors and men who do not 
drill. 

At a meeting, last Wednesday eve- 
ning, of those Interested in a literary 
magazine, Louis Brandt of Everett 
was elected Editor-in-chief and Frank 
L. Thomas of Athol, Business Mana- 
ger. The committee previously ap- 
pointed was dismissed. A constitu- 
tion is at present being drawn up and 
will be presented at the next regular 
meeting. The projectors of the mag- 
azine expect to issue the first number 
in January, and thereafter to publish it 
monthly. 

PUBLIC SPEAK1NC COURSES 

The following courses will be offered 
during the second semester in Public 
Speaking : 

FOR FRESHMEN. 

Course 2. Eight sections. Com- 
mencing April 5th. Vocal exercises ; 
practice in the delivery of declamations 
and original speeches. One hour a 
week. 

FOR SOPHOMORKS. 

Course 3. One section. Same as 
Course 3 the first semester. For 
sophomores who wish to take Public 
Speaking for the first time this year. 
Course will consist of original speeches, 
and declamations supplemented by ex- 
ercises for the development of the 
voice and good delivery. One hour; 
credit one. 

Course 4. Two sections. Work 
more advanced than in Course 3. 
Speeches, declamations, and the pre- 
sentation of group scenes from great 
dramas, together with exercises on 
form. Open to those who have had 
Course 3. One hour; credit one. 

Course 4. One section. This sec- 
tion will devote the time to "Dramatic 
Reading," and will present a play at 
the close of the semester. Open by 
special permission to those who have 
had Course 3. One hour; credit one. 




With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4.00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 

Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 

JAMES F. PAGE. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line 0/ College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT & SHOE 
REPAIRING 



AT 



LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

i. LEVINE 

II 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



Playing Cards 



THURBER'S 

Next-To Post office 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



Jan. 



FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS. 

Course 6. Debating. Class will 
give considerable time to the study of 
argumentation and brief-drawing, and 
will be divided into teams for the plat- 
form discussion of leading questions of 
the day. (This is planned as a one- 
Vesper Service hour course for one credit, but may be 
in Chapel. Bishop A. H.Vin- g j ven as a two-hour course for two 
ton of Springfield. credits, if time and the adjustment of 

1 1 — 7-00 p. m. Stockbridge Club other cours es will permit), 
in Agricultural Room. Mr. Course 7 . The Occasional Speech. 



Congress Cards, all backs, 50c 

Bridge Cards, 5 oc and 2 5 c 

500 Cards, 50 Pinochle, 25c 

Bicycle, Indicator and Squeezers, 

Kach 25c 

Be sure and see the new Bud-Bridge 
Card, club linen and velour, 

Each 25c 

Bridge 500 Score Pads 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



Sl gowns 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



Haskell will speak. 



This course will consist of the delivery 

— ^^— of speeches leading up to the preparation 

COLLEGE NOTES and delivery of a formal "occasional 

The elective blanks for seniors and J speech," supplemented by a study of 
juniors for second semester electives the principles involved in effective pub 
have been distributed and are to be 1 lie speaking. One hour; credit one 
returned to the Dean's office before ; Signed, 

Friday. Dec. 17, 1909. F - B - McKay. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 14, 1909. 



THE SECOND INFORMAL 

The theory that the student money 
market is tight just before Christmas 
was exploded last Saturday. For 
sixty-six fellows with a wholesome rel- 
ish for a good time, escorting as many 
young ladles, attended the informal 
and are agreed that it was the best 
yet. 

The Informal Committee deserves 
unstinted praise for the good taste 
displayed in decorating the Drill Hall. 
Broad maroon streamers radiated 
from the ceiling above the orchestra 
stand in the center of the floor to the 
walls. A great electric lighted "M" 
glowed from beneath the balcony. At 
the opposite extremity of the hall the 
Stars and Stripes spread from wall to 
wall and from floor to ceiling. The 
warm, rich colors involved in the 
scheme of decoration contrasted most 
gratefully with the wintery gray of the 
campus. 

Mrs. E. C. Rowe served an excel- 
lent supper at Draper Hall and added 
as favors, carnations and roses. Music 



was provided by Herrick's Westfield 

Orchestra. Dancing lasted until 9-30. 

The patronesses were, — Mrs. S. F. 

Howard and Mrs. J. E. Ostrander of 

the college. Miss Wells of Mt. Hol- 

yoke, and Miss Snow of Smith. 

Those who attended were : 

1910. — Allen, Annis, Armstrong, J. 

C. Bailey, Blaney, H. A. Brooks, 

S. C. Brooks, Brown, Clarke. Cloues. 

Cowles, Dickinson, Eddy, Everson, 

Folsom, Francis, Haynes, Hazen, 

Johnson, Leonard, McLaine, Mendum, 

Nickless, Thomas, Titus, Turner. 

Waldron. 

1911.— Allen, Baker, Bentley, Hill, 
Howe, Johnson, Larrabee, Lodge, 
McGraw, Piper, Sharpe, Stevenson, 
Whitney, Willard, Winn. 

1912.— Birdsall, Cabot, Hallowell, 
K ingsbury , Pierpont , Southwick , Tower , 
Walker, Wilde, Williams. 

1913.- Adams, H. M. Baker, 
Bursley, Clark, Clegg, Cooper, Goid- 
nough, Hayden, Jones, Patch, Pellett, 
Rhyder, Shute, Zabriskie. 

Also, — J. R. Parker and T. L. 
Warner, '08. and J. Noyes and M. 
W. Thompson, '09. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OK 



C. R. ELDER 



Folsom '10 



Nickless '10 



Aggie 



Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers ' 1 2 



JUST THE THING 



FOK AN 



XMAS Gin 

Appropriate Useful 



THE CROCKER 
FOUNTAIN PEN 

"You Blow It To FiV It" 

A constant reminder of the 
giver. 

A fountain of satisfaction. 
(Guaranteed unconditionally. 

For sale hv 



L\ E. MILU:TT 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FRATERNITIES PLEDGE MEM- 
BERS. 

The following men were pledged to 
the different fraternities last week : 

Q.T. V.—W. S. Baker of Wollaston, 
R. C. Blake of Wollaston, J. D. 
French of Hyde Park, H. E. Gore of 
Wollaston, C. B. Heath of Needham, 
G. E. Howe of Marlborough, R. E. 
Hubbard of Hatfield, S. M. Jordan of 
Rutherford, N. J., F. S. Madison '12 
of Greenwich, R. I. 

Phi Sigma Kappa.— R. H. Currier 
of Pelham, N. H., C. A. Hurley of 
Brockton, W. V. Hayden of Beverly, 
H. F. Jones of Campello, R. K. 
Patch of Beverly, L. N. Pease of 
Meriden, Conn., E. F. Putnum of 
Easthampton, C. A. Shute of Clayton, 
III., R. H. Van Zwalenburg of 
Rutherford, N. J.,C. D. Walker of 
Greenwich Village. 

C. S. C.—R. J. Borden of Fall 
River, C. H. Brewer of Mt. Vernon, 
N. Y., F. J. Clegg of Fall River, A. 
S. Tupper of Jamaica Plain, J. L. 
Shea of Amherst. 

Kappa Sigma: — 0. G. Anderson of 
East Pepperell, H. M. Baker of Sel- 
byville, Del., B. W. Ellis of Plymouth, 
H. E. Goodnough of Wiibraham, L. 
F. Harrington of Taunton, S. P. 
Huntington of Lynn, H. W. Hyland 
of Weymouth, N. P. Larsen of Bridge- 
port, Conn., W. S. Little of New- 
buryport, H. B. Roehrs, N. Y., H. B. 
Staab of Northampton, S. D. Samson 
of Grand Isle, Vt. 

Theta P/ii:—W. F. Adams of East 
Leverett, L. W. Burby of Chicopee, 
H. B. Bursley of Peabody, J, W. 
Bradley of Groton, H. W. Angier of 
Westboro, J. B. Cobb of Chicopee 
Falls, N. R. Clark of Worcester, L. 
F. Guild of Swanton, Vt., F. A. 
Kenney of Charlestown, J. W. Lesure 
of Lunenburg, W. S. Moir of Boston, 
J. D. Pellett of Worcester, W. C. 
Whitman of Abington. 

Kappa Gamma Phi- — F. L. Ames 
of Cochituate, T. J. Godvin of Jama- 
ica Plain, J. L. O'Bnen of Wayland, 
D. A. Sheehan of South Lincoln. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Kail Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
I latters, 
Tailors. 



"For the Land's Sake." 



Stable manure, as a by product of the larm, will be a favorite 
soutce of fertility, partly because of its plant food and chiefly because 

of the humus it supplies, bat hi Market gardening and in ganerri fain. 

practice the best results will be obtained when it is used in < otuiei tion 
with chemical manures < >n the other hand, chemical manures not only 
supply in a concentrated way needed plant food, but supply it in forms that 
anticipate, supplement and in some cases piomote bacterial action, with- 
out which stable manure, and even the organic portion of the fertilizer, 
would be barren in results. The progressive farmer, therefore, supple- 
ments and improves his stable manure by the use of concentrated fer- 
tilizers in the same way that he supplements and improves his hay with 
the use of concentrated gr.un foods in feeding his stock. 

Study the plant food problem 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATrlAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 

Asylurn ai\H High Streets, Hartford, Conn- 

One block from LJnion Station. Beautifully located, facing llushnell Park 

and -State capital. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkr S. Garde. 






£&rp*ivter St Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 14, iOC-9- 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL. SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 

Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - . - - $12.50 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - ■ $ii-5° 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - fio.oo 

Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - *9-°° 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - %9°° 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. .... $9.00 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - $9.00 

Rain Cloth, - $3.50 per yd. Trouserings, - $3.50 per yard. 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



CALL FOR COLLEGE MEN 

[Continued from first page.] 



k. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

(Qr* Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, 



10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



M. M. (ill. MAN. 

TELEPHONE 



C. A. MOFFET. 
1079-3. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3d. pieces 50c ts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 2scts. 

25 " Broken Hank and Confederate 

Hills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mail Auction Circulars and 
Selling price list. 



GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to ill Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



COX SONS 

AND 

ipF* VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 




HERBERT 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST 



E. MOREY 



Boston. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



As an illustration I would cite the 
call for men to teach agriculture and 
science in our high schools. Now it 
is true that some of these positions at 
the outset do not pay very much, per- 
haps $800, $900, or $1000. But 
there is this to say on the other hand, 
that there is no better discipline for a 
man fresh from college for two or 
three years than teaching, and on the 
whole, teaching in schools of the grade 
of high schools is a better training 
than teaching in college, because it 
calls for a wide rather than a narrow 
knowledge, it calls for the development 
of great tact and patience and all those 
qualities that have so much to do with 
the development of a man as a man. 

We have today in this office calls 
for men to take charge of agricultural 
schools and similar propositions, at 
salaries ranging from $1500 to $2500, 
that we simply are not able to fill. Of 
course these positions are not open to 
men fresh from their baccalaureate 
degree. A man must have had some 
experience, and proved that he has got 
the right stuff in him. 

Let me also push this same illustra- 
tion a little further, with application to 
the need of seeing beyond the question 
of commercial enterprise in agriculture. 
The rural school is destined to be a 
great centre of rural life and civiliza- 
tion. If a man wants to do strong 
work in the world, the headship of 
such a school will give him a wonder- 
ful opportunity for work that will tax 
the capacity of a strong man, and that 
will at the same time give him a fair 
salary. He will have had a chance to 
be a leader, to help build up the com- 
munity, to study broadly, to use tine 
executive ability. These things, too, 
are all the more worth while than 
merely the question of accumulating 
money. 

Like opportunities come with the 
county secretaryships of the Y. M. C. 
A., and along many other lines which 
are fast opening up now ; and the man 
who goes into these things must not 
only be a strong man and have the 
right character and equipment, but he 
must also be anxious to be of special 
service to his fellow men. 

Now there is a perpetual danger 
that in a technical college students will 
get to emphasizing the value of tech- 
nical knowledge and the importance of 
money rewards for the use of this 
knowledge. While it is true that our 
men are gradually thinking more and 
more of these social service positions, 
1 should like to see the time come 
very soon when a much larger propor- 
tion of our men should become inter- 
ested from the service point of view. 

Let me close this little homily by 
quoting from a letter received this 
autumn from J. E. Halligan, 1900, 
which is a propos of this demand for 
men : 

"I am glad to know that the en- 
trance class at M. A. C, is large and 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



,*E. N. PARISEAU.^t 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 



FEED STABLES 



Before ordering your horses 
Proms and other occasions call 



for 



on 



F. H. WARREN 
<£ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December, 14, 1909. 




THOMPSON 



Sporting Goods 

Store and 

Repair Shop. 



Don't strain your 
eyes by using a kero- 
sene lamp or an elec- 
tric lamp hung in the 
center of the room. 

Call and see our 
full line of Portable 
Electric Lamps at 
£2.50 up. 

3 handsome Read- 
ing Lamps at a very 
low price. 

Coat and vest pock- 
et lights. All prices. 

Batteries and El- 
ectrical Novelties. 






E. A. Thompson 



Rear of First Nat. Bank. 



if the boys could only realize the oppor- 
tunities for graduates of M. A. C. they 
would certainly study harder. From 
my observation I feel that the chances 
are better for an agricultural man than 
for a man in any other line at the 
present time. 

'•The South is beginning to wake up. 
The boll weevil is causing the one-crop 
farmers to diversify. Although this 
insect is putting many people in sore 
financial straits, it will be a blessing 
for the south in that the farmers will 
raise their corn, beef, hogs, and other 
accessories at home. 

"Agricultural high schools are being 
established all over this section. 
These schools are going to be the 
coming preparatory schools for the 
colleges and they should be the me- 
dium for keeping the educated boys on 
the farms." 

Kenyon L. Butterfield. 



T. I„. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



HOCKEY SEASON OPENS 

fContlnued from first page.] 

ever, now that the rink is in good con- 
dition, the men will have an opportun- 
ity to develope some good teamwork, 
and with the excellent material avail- 
able, a successful season is already 
assured. 
The lineup: 

M. A. C. N. Y. M. C. A. 

Ackerman. Nickerson, g . Depot 

Moir, p.. Hickey 

Adams, c. p.. Wright 

Brandt, (capt.) c. Warner, (capt ) 

Sanctuary, 1. w.. Livermore 

Bentley. Brewer. r. w , Herbert 

Peckham. r. Day 

Score— M. A. C 2. N. Y. M C .A 1. 
Goals— Brandt, Peckham, Day. Umpires 
— Chapman and Summers. Timers— Sum- 
mers and Smith Referee— Reynolds. 
Time — Twenty minute halves. 

THE SPECIAL CAR SYSTEM 

Just before every Informal you hear 
someone asking, "Is there a special 
car to Mt. Holyoke this time? Who 
is running it?" and a dozen or more 
similar questions. Now, I belhve 
that the time has come when some- 
thing definite must be done about this j 
special car business and as I have 
been unfortunate enough to be more | 
or less mixed up in this work during 
the past two years, I am going to take 
the liberty to write a few lines on the 
subject. 

A special car from Smith or Mt. 
Holyoke costs $14 and owing to the 
very courteous treatment which we 
have received from the street railway 
men we usually "tip" them from 50 
cents to a dollar each. This makes 
about $16 for expenses including 
telephoning. 

According to the present custom 
some fellow puts up a notice asking 
the men desiring seats on the special 
to hand their names to him. About 
one-half of the men that really expect 
to take the car hand in their names 
and the rest "take a chance." 

You telephone to the street railway 
that a double truck car seating 36 
people will be plenty large enough. 
When Saturday comes and you get on 
the car you find a number of men who 
never handed in their names. If you 
were to ask them to take the regular 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Pressor, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 

All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style. 

Full Dress Suits for Rent 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Come Early and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants $1.50. 
Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance 

Store 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4 

THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

I'fie Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

< liss Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and ("ailing Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



\ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 14, iQQ9- 




.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••••••••••••••••••'•'•*•'•■•'•'•'•'•'•■• •'•'•'•'•"•* 

COODS FOR MEN. 



car they would feel highly Insulted, but experimental work m the cranberry 

what else can you do? Usually some industry." Nearly, ,f not quite $1000 

of us stand up both ways and some will probably be raised In this way 

one else who has a seat kicks about and it will be of material aid to the 

the crowded car. station in its work. It is hoped the 

Perhaos worse than this is the man cranberry growers will make .t a per- 
who sends another fellow after his girl ! manent policy to co-operate with the 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•••••••••'•••••"•'•'•■•'•*•'•••'•'•'•'•'••"•'•'•'• 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass 



THE OLD CORP DRUG STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine RgfmMnt <' Specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN j* 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Hlock, Amhkkst, Mass. 



Cut flowers always on hand 

FcleptWNM or call. 



and then wants a rebate because he 
only rides one way. 

The average number, exclusive of 
last Saturday, on the Mt. Holyoke 
special has been 18. In the six times 
I have had charge of this car I have 
never been able to collect a full share 
from every man. Somebody missed 
\ the car or only came one way or some- 
thing else happened. It makes a pretty 
hard job to know how to figure things. 
Custom has allowed that the man 
in charge of the car shall get his 
expenses paid but if he doesn't earn 
them I will miss my guess. 

Some change in the system ought 
to be made at once. Here is a plan 
that came to my mind: 

Let the Informal committee take 
charge of the car and sell tickets for 
eighty- five cents each, which is a fair 
price, the regular fare for two round 
trips being over a dollar. These tick 
jets should have four coupons. Let 
the conductor get one coupon from 
each man every time he rides. That 
is, Coupon No. 1 would take him to 
South Hadley, Coupon No. 2 would 
bring him and his friend back to col- 
lege, No. 3 would take the couple 
back to South Hadley while No. 4 
would bring him home. 

sale of these tickets should 
stop on Friday evening for every man 
knows then whether or not he is 
going. There would be some Informals 
where the committee would los' 
money. But, t«»ken through the year, 
the thing would even up and would be 
a system where every man would pay 

his share. 

Myron S. Hazen. 



station in carrying on its cranberry 
investigations. 

AGRICULTURE. 

The dairy inspector of the firm of 
D. Whiting & Sons, who purchase the 
M. A. C. certified milk and distribute 
it in Boston, visited the farm and 
barns on Dec. 4. His report was made 
in the form of a score card, as recom- 
mended by the Dairy Division of the 
United States Department, of Agricul- 
ture. The perfect score of 100 
depends upon perfection in forty-five 
different details of equipment and 
management. 40 points being allowed 
for equipment and 60 points for meth- 
ods. The M. A. C. score was 99^. 

BOTANY. 

Dr. G. E. Stone left Dec. 13th for 

California and the Pacific Coast. He 

will attend there a meeting of the 
Western Alumni association. 



Holland's Block. Phot-nix Row 

SI I AM 1 II TIM',. Telephone 59-4- 

GAS II I I l»Oi TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

\ Specialty of Kepairinn 

Crunch Windows, 
Mk.mokul Windows, 
Lead LIGHTS, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHKKST. MASS 



E.B. DICKINSON D. D. S. 

D 8 IV T A L, **< ><> M • 

Williams Block, Amhkkst, Mass. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The Short Course department, in 
conjunction with the department of 
Pomology, has taken charge of several 
demonstration orchards in different 
sections of the state One has just 



ALUMNI NEWS 

WESTERN ALUMNI BANQUET. 
The annual reunion and dinner of 
the M. A. C. Western Alumni club 
was held at the Union League club, 
Chicago, Dec. 4. Twenty-one were 
oresent. including Dr. Wm. P. Brooks 
and E. H. Forrestall of M. A. C. 
The party spent the afternoon at the 
Live Stock show at the Union Stock 
yards. The dinner and evening hours 
brought forth the deep and active loy- 
alty of this western club. The affair 
was very informal, a reunion of "jolly 
good fellows." This association, the 
only one which does so, voted as usual 
the money for its annual Western 
Alumni Association Prize. Substan- 
tial contributions towards the fitting up 
of the new athletic field were promised. 
Looking to the organization of the 
alumni class and association secreta- 
ries for systematic and co-ordinate 
work. Dr. J. A. Cutter '82 called a 
meeting preceeding the New York 
Alumni club Dinner Dec. 3d. Tem- 



< II! N 1 IIOL'RS: 

etoiaA.M. LBOtoBF 



M. 



Ether and Nitrous 
stered when desired 



Oxide Gas admin- 



hp Pn established at West Newbury. , 

been estaonsnea j { werg e , ected as foUows: 

A A arre site has been selected and ^' ' ..,,.,.» »or 

President. Dr. Winfield Ayres '86 ; 

treasurer. Dr. Charles Wellington 73; 



BEST FAR! IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, batS room, 
hot and cold water; boat farm in this 
section, running spring water. 40 acres 
tillage, 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
her: plenty of fruit and many other gOOl 
features. $6000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 

Vv\ R. BROWN 

AMHERST. MASS. 



J. H. TROTT 



willbe planted out next spring. 

FLORICULTURE. 

Prof. E. A. White will lecture 
before the Worcester County Horticul- 
tural Society in Horticultural Hall, 
Worcester, Jan. 18, 1910. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

Prof. W. P. Brooks and Dr. H. J. 
Franklin were recently in conference 
with the legislative committee of the 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, cp. c°d cranberry 0"""*'r* 

• «...«. , _:„.;„„ At o mpptinc of th( 

Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



ci .it ion. At a meeting of the commit- 
tee in Boston on Nov. 15, it was 
"unanimously voted that . . . pledges 
be collected by the treasurer of the 
association and that the amount so 
collected be turned over to the treas 



secretary, S, B. Haskell '04; to the 
executive committee, Dr. J. A. Cutter 
'82. It is planned to effect a perma- 
nent organization next commencement. 
Among recent visitors at college 
have been A. W. Gilbert '04, F. A. 

Bartlett '05, F. C. Thurston and T. 

L. Warner '08. 

71_ — a second edition of W. H. 

Bowker's "Plant Food, Its Sources, 

Conservation and Application" has 

been issued. 

73. — The American association for 

the advancement of Science has 

elected David P. Penhallow, of McGill 



urer of the Massachusetts Agricultural University, vice-president of the divis- 
Experiment Station to be used for ion of Botany for the Boston meeting. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 14, 1909. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 




THE H. L. FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters an J Entomologists 



STAMFORD, ( oNN. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 



(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 



'83. — H. J. Wheeler attended the 
National Corn show at Omaha, Neb., 
last week. 

'83.— S. M. Holman of Attleboro, 
has been elected to the House of 
Representatives. 

'87.— E. F. Richardson of Millis, 
has been re-elected a county com- 
missioner of Norfolk county. 

'87.— F. B. Carpenter of Rich- 
mon 1, Va., has been elected chairman 
of the division of Fertilizer Chemistry 
for the winter m-eting of the American 
Chemical Society, to be held at Bos- 
ton. He is an assistant eoitor of the 
Journal of I idustrial and Engineering 
Chemistry published by the American 
Chemical Society. 

'92.— E. T. Clark has charge of 
outside work at the Industrial School 
for Boys at Stiirley. 

'93.— E. C. Howard, 10 Church 
St., East Milton, Mass. 

'94.— Mr. A. H. Cutter was re- 
cently married. His address is 333 
Broadway, Lawrence, Mass. 

'99. _W. E. Hinds reports that 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute has 
the southernmost group of three 
M. A. C. men in one educational 
institution, a center for . possible ^ fl E COE'MORTIMER CO.. 



SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



At the Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 1H-24, 1909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, (Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Four 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by M'<. 
GEOKGE .V DREW, of Connecticut, M. .\. ( ..(lass 

of 1897. (Our pamphlet M Up To Date Fruit Grow- 
ing" is M nt free if you mention The College Signal) 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



M. A. C. club of the South which 
ought to be established. 

'00. — F. H. Brown won many prizes 
this fall with the peaches from his young 
orchard. He has been nominated by 
both republicans and democrats for 
school committee from his ward. He 
has been elected master of the 
Borough Pomona grange and has 
served as lecturer of the Marlboro 
grange for three years. 

'00. — Two medals won in a 
M. A. C.-Willistonmeet were recently 
received from Mr. F. C. Stanley. It 
is urged that other alumni make con- 
tributions to our Trophy Room. 

'01.— Born, July 25. to J. H. and 
M. B. Chickering a daughter, Emily 
Edeler. 

'02 — C. I. Lewis who has recently 
suffered a serious nervous treakdown 
is now in Santa Ar.a, Cal. and recov- 
ering nicely. 

"04.— Prof. S. B. Haskell spoke in 
Spencer before the Northwest Far- 
mer's Club on "Soils" Nov. 26th. 

'05. — The engagement of Miss 
Nella Bull, Lighthouse Road, New 
Haven, Conn., to J. T. Lyman has 
been announced. 

'05. — Willard Anson Munson and 
Miss Helen May Squier were mar- 
ried at Holyoke Dec. 8. 

'05.— P. F. Williams is Acting 
Professor of Horticulture during the 
absence of the head of the department. 

'06. — Married Nov. 4, at Addison 
Conn., Louis Hale Moseby to Charlotte 
Mary Rutherford. 

'06.— C. F. Pray left Amherst Dec. 
3 to resume his work in Cuba. 

'06. — S. S. Rogers has resigned as 
assistant Agriculturist of the Spreckels 



24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



We also distribute fr «>in Huston, Mass., Belfast, Me- Baltimore, 
Md.. Wilmington, N.C., s.i\ annah, <..».. sod 1 bai leston, S.C 



TURKISH 



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npEAM'S out for practice— go out and watch. See wnat 
-*• they'll do when the real struggle comes. 

'ut be sure there's a pack of Fatimas in your pocket ! A clean, cool, delicious 
noke — best Turkish tobaccos perfectly blended — enjoyed by all who try them. 
An inexpensive package, but ten extra cigarettes. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



ft 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 14, '9°9- 



Sugar Co. Experiment Station and is 
now working for the state of California 
on vegetable diseases under R.E. Smith 
'94. He is stationed in a desert in the 
southern part of the state, 60 miles 
from a railroad. 

ex- '06.— W. W. Colton is forester 
in charge of the F. S. Crane estate, 
Dalton. There are 3000 acres under 
forestry management, including a 
nursery of 200,000 trees. 

'07.— A. A. Hartford, Principal 
of Norfolk High school, teacher of 
Latin and mathematics. 

'08. — P. W. Farrar, Engineer for 
Twin Falls Salmon River Land and 
Water Co. Address,— In care of 
Salmon River Dam. Twin Falls, 
Idaho. 

'08. — George Paige, Insurance Sur- 
veyor, Sanborn Map Co., 1 1 Broad- 
way, N. Y. 

'08. — C. C. Gowdey, government 
entomologist of British East Africa, 
has just issued leaflets on "Cacao 
Fruit Fly'' and "Uganda Insect 
Pests." 

'08.— E D. Philbrick, 831 Monad- 
nock Building, Chicago, 111. 

'08. — E. N. Bailey has been ap- 
pointed assistant in plant breeding at 
the Illinois Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

'08. — F. E. Thurston spent a few 
days at college before commencing 
his work in Cuba as a sugar chemist. 

'08. — W. F. Turner is engaged in 
investigations under the Adams fund 
studying the -'rice weevii" and its con- 
trol in stored corn to which it does 
millions of dollars worth of damage 
each season in the South. A new 
building for agriculture has been com- 
pleted which pives greatly improved 
facilities to Alabama Polytechnic Insti- 
tute where he is. 

'09.— H.P.Crosby, 34 Clark street, 

Chelsea. Teacher of Biology, Chelsea 

High school. 

'09. — G. R. Fulton, with Guantan- 

amo Sugar Co., Guantanamo, Cuba. 

'09. — The engagement of Miss 
Edna Alice Moore of Watertown to 
Elmer Francis Hathaway of Cam- 
bridge has been announced. 

Ex-' 10.— Married, Nov. 25, A. C. 
Kelley to Miss Elsie A. Johnson of 
Robbinston, Me. At home, 45 Mt. 
Vernon St., Boston. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Below is a list of courses offered by the College for the first time in 
,909-19.0. Several other courses have been greatly amplified and extended. 
In the Department of Agricultural Education: 

Sinmar in Education. 

In the Division of Agriculture: 

Kield Crop Improvement, Advanced -...Is, Manures and >;«"|»f«* s !j?tfjfc Mulatto! 
Improvement, bairy Cattle, deeding and Management of Farm U» Stocfc Market miik. 
Making, Manufactured M ilk I'rodtu tv 

In the Department of Chemistry: 
Advanced Attlyate, Cliemistn of Saga! Making and Refetaf. 
In the Division of Horticulture: 

The Literature.,. Horticulture Practical ^r'^^^J^t^u^ ^ C " n ' 
struction, Pall Greenhouse Crop*, Theory ot l.andsc.ip. I Art, Ornamental Oardemng. 

In the Division of Humanities: 

Department of I. KBgaaft and Literature— i.„;„ji„nv„i 

, ,i„in« Course (double course . AgncaltaraJI J«raa«.» da»We coarse), ga} , «J^: 
I.*. Pro^l&rta journalism <d^ 

tan and Restoration Literature, Earh ^^" , J , n ^«" ttt \L^ e " t Ea r lv Nineteenth Century Liter 
Literature, Transition Eighteenth -N fnetaenth ( Mtar* fc^ ra *2^K. Advanced trench (double 

Department of Political Science— 

I eoaoaiic Htatar», The ll.-torvof N«-w Enaland. The History of Ideals. 

In the Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Civil Engineering: 

Analytic Mechanics, Descriptive GaUMll". 

In the Department of Physical Education and Hygiene: 

HyfW Llementary (.ymnastus, Graded Gymnastics. Heavy Gymanastics. Training Course, 
Advamed Gymnasth a, 

In the Department of Rural Social Science: 

Elements of Agricultural Economics. Histori, al and Comparative Agriculture, Specific Fro- 
bfeus in Agricultural Economics, Seminar (doable coarse). *,u. M „ 

The term "double course" indicates that the course is given for both semesters of the year. 

SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

Eleven Index, H. W. Blaney, Manager 

Twelve Index, F. A. Castle, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L S. Dickinson, Mat.ager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 

H. W. French, President 

H.J. Baker, President 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Senate, 
Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and 
N neteen Hundred and 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Debating Club, 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



for 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



JACKSON Of CUTLER 



FOUND— A sum of money. E. M. 
Brown, Theta Phi House. 



CARS 

Leave AGGIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rate* 

AMHERST It SUNDERLAND ST. fit. CO. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS.WfiJM. LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving <1. Davis, Agent, 12 North 



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Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



f 

? roL. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January II, 1910. 



No. 13 



& COMMENCEMENT SING BASEBALL SCHEDULE HOUSING STUDENT BODY 



HOCKEY VICTORY 



3 



Nineteen Hundred and Seven to Award For 1910 Announced. Manager Lodge Dr. 



Trophies. A Stimulus for Bet- 
ter College Singing. 



Gives Good Schedule, 
ment Game with 



Commence- 
Amherst. 



To stimulate college singing in gen- There are sixteen games scheduled 
eral, and to encourage the production for the M. A. C. baseball team this 



A. W. Gilbert '04 Discusses the 
Situation. Fraternities Play 
a Large Part. 



of original college songs, the class of 
1907 offers for the year 1910 a prize 
of $20 in gold to the undergraduate 
class winning a competitive class sing 
held under the conditions stated below. 
This class also offers a permanent cup 
to be competed for annually under the 
same conditions, to be preserved in 
the Trophy Room of the Social Union, 
and to bear the numerals of the class 
winning the trophy each year. This 
will be known as the "Arthur H. 
Armstrong Trophy" in honor and to 
the memory of our deceased class- 
mate, Arthur H. Armstrong. 

REGULATIONS 

1. The sing shall be held during 
commencement week at a place and 
time satisfactory to the committee 
representing the class of 1907. 

2. To be an eligible competitor, a 
class must have present at least 80^ 
nf its total membership. 

3. Each class shall present at least 
one selection suitable to be used as a 
college song, the words or the words 
and music of which are original with 
some member or members of the 
class presenting the song. 

4 Each class shall appear twice ; it 
shall sing not less than two songs at 
each appearance, but the time allotted 
to each class for each appearance, 
shall not exceed ten minutes. 

5. Each class shall sing as one of 



coming season. Four of these will be 
played on the home grounds, another 
at Pratt Field and the remaining 
games out of town. 

Manager C. A. Lodge has arranged 
the following schedule : 
April 13 — Brown at Providence. 
15 — Tufts at Amherst. 
21 — Vermont at Amherst. 
30— S. T. S. at Springfield. 
May 7 — Williams at Williamstown. 
II— S. T. S. at Amherst. 
14 -W. P. I. at Worcester. 
21— R. I. State at Amherst. 
25 — Andover at Andover. 
26— Tufts at Medford. 
28 — Trinity at Hartford. 
June 1 — Norwich at Northfield. Vt. 
2 — Vermont at Burlington. 
3 — Middlebury at Middlebury. 
4 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
18 — Amherst at Pratt Field. 
The schedule Is a hard one and 
some of tne strongest college teams in 
New England will be met. Besides 
Capt. H. W. French, there are four 
"M" men and these will form the 
nucleus of a strong nine. In Captain 
French and E. R. Williams the team 
has an excellent battery ; but new 
material is badly needed in the oth^r 
positions, the only other regulars 
remaining being T. W. Bean, A. J. 
Ackerman and C. I. Hosmer. How- 
ever, with some good material in the 
entering class, there is no reason why 



There has been recently sent to the 
alumni a circular letter from President 
Butterfield containing many questions, 
the solution of which will be of the 
greatest importance to the develop- 
ment of M. A. C. 

Several articles have already ap- 
pealed in the Signal upon this question 
of the housing of students. In reply to 
the circular letter mentioned above, 
I have recorded a few observations 
which do not agree fully with some of the 
articles which have appeared in the 
Signal and I wish to take this occa- 
sion to outline my views and observa- 
tions a little more in detail. 

I grant that there are many glaring 
evils In the fraternity system, but I con- 
tend that in spite of these, the advanta- 
ges of fraternities to our college r- J 
its students far outweigh the disadvan- 
tages. 

The writer has had opportunity to 
come into direct touch with this prob- 
lem In three institutions an^ to make 
observations in many more. I have 
experienced the advantages and disad- 
vantages of living in private houses, in 
domitories (both North and South 
Colleges), and In a fraternity house. 

In adopting a policy for M. A. C. 
we should look ahead and judge of our 
future deveopment and plan for it 
rather than to form a policy to meet 
the immediate needs and be forced to 
change it later. 



its selections at its first appearance, | a winning combination should not be 



one verse and chorus of "Old Mass'- 
chusetts, " and at the close of the con- 
test, the classes shall sing, together 
the entire song. 

6. The prize and trophy shall be 
awarded to the class which, in the 
opinion of the judges, has the highest 
grade based on the following scale of 
points : 

For general excellence In singing 60 
points. 

For attendance (above the required 
80£) 20 points. 

For originality in composition 20 
points. 

7. Points awarded for originality 
shall be on the following basis : 

A maximum of ten points for songs, 
the words of which are original with 
some member of the class presenting 
the song. 

A maximum of twenty points for 
songs, both the words and music of 
which are original with some member 



turned out. 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 


In competition for the College Sig- 


nal, the contestants rank 


as 


follows : 


191 1. 




Credits. 


F. A. Prouty, 




2.175 


E. A. Larabee, 




0.000 


1912. 






R. N. Hallowell, 




6.457 


M. C. Pratt, 




3.45 


1913. 






R. H. VanZwalenburg, 




11.51 


O. G. Anderson, 




8.485 


S. M. Jordan, 




7.41 


F. D. Griggs, 




4.99 


R. J. Borden, 




3.9 


H. M. Baker, 




2.720 


The editor wishes that 


all 


contest- 



Game with Training School Played on 

Pratt Rink. Evenly Matched Teams 

Play Close and Exciting Game. 

Saturday afternoon, Jan. 8, we wen 
our fi-st regular hockey game by de- 
feating Springfield Training School 
3-2. The game was exciting through- 
out, and it was not until the last 
whistle, that one could be sure of the 
result. Owing to the poor condition 
of our own rink, the game was played 
on the Amherst College rink, which 
was in excellent condition. 

Spnngf eld started the scoring about 
two minutes after the game started, 
Berry scoring the goal. Sanctuary 
followed with one for us about three 
minutes later that finished the scoring 
for the first half though Springfield 
made several shots, which Ackerman's 
good work prevented from being goals. 
The play was evenly distributed ovr 
ttw rlr k, now in Springfield's territory, 
and now in our own. At the end of 
the half the score was still I -I. 

In the second half, the playing was 
well divided. Frequent bursts of 
speed and teamwork gave either sldt 
the Duck near their opponent's goals, 
but neither team was able to score. 
Brewer replaced Bentley, and Hickey 
took Morr's place. Peckham was 
forced to retire because of a slight In- 
jury to his knee, and Capt. Brandt 
took his place, Heath going In at cen- 
ter. About five minutes before the 
end of the game, Capt. Brandt suc- 
ceeded in shooting a goal, which w« 
quickly followed by one by Berry for 



The indications are that M. A. C. j Springfield, again tieing the score. 
will have from 800-1000 collegiate ! With only a minute to play, Branat 
students in ten years if the present rate j shot another goal, thus winning th- 
of increase is maintained and we have I game. 



every reason to believe that such will 
be the case. We want to consider 



For Springfield. Berry and Best 
played good games. Brandt, Peck- 



Daily%%. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



Continued on page 8.] 



the conditions as they will be ten or I ham and Ackerman excelled for w 

fifteen years hence, and not as they | Ackerman's goal tending was a feature 

are to-day or as they were when we i of the game. Heath, a freshman, 

were in college. shoved up very well at center and 

I believe in a domitory system for should make good. 

the housing of students supplemented The line-up i — 

by fraternity houses, that is, I think M - A - c - 

that the ideal system would be to have Ackerman. g. 

about two-thirds of the students live in orr ' ,c ey " p 

Adams, c. p. 
domitories and the remainder in frater- Brant Heath, c. 

nity houses. A strong, central Social \ Sanctuary. 1. w. 

Union should be maintained and all j Bentley, Brewer, r. w 

! students should eat together at a "com- Peckham. Brandt, r. 

.. .. . Score-M. A C. 3, S. T. S. 2. Goals— 

mons. If three hundred students , _ _ _ , .. 

Brandt 2, Sanctuary. Berry 2. Umpires- 
should live in fraternity houses, it would schermerhorn and Nickerson. Timer- 
require ten or twelve houses; no fra- Sharp Referee -Dr. Reynolds. Time— 
ternity house should accommodate 15-mtnute halves, 
arts be especially careful of the man- ; more tnan thlrty men For the col . 

ner in which their material is handed , ege t0 be re |j eve< i f housing three 

in. Use English theme paper, write hundred stu dents is an advantage in 

upon one side only, and with ink. itse]f not to ^ over looked. 

Thus all the papers will be uniform In 

size and more easily handled. [Continued on par* *1 



s. 1 

g.. Salassa 

p., Emei 

c p., Hopkit ia 

c. Berry 

I. w., Hutchings 

r. w.. Best 

r.. Guellow (Capt.) 



'88. — Montana Farmers' Institute, 
F. S. Cooley, Sup't.. opens its School 
for Fruit Growers Jan. 10, the first 
time such a short course school has 
been conducted in that state. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January n, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOASD OF EDITORS. 



Jan. 



in 



WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911. 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910. 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910. 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911. 



EdItor-ln-Chlef. 

Asst. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, Colleg* Notes. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. M. 

Tuesday. Thursday and Fridays from b-30 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 ?. M. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 P. M. 

Thursday I 1-15 to 12 M. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

12— Assembly, 1-15 p. m 
Chapel. Band Concert. 
7-00 p. m. Debating club In the 
Agricultural Lecture Room. 

13— Y. M. C. A. In Chapel at 
6-45 p. M. Prof. F.A.Waugh. 

14— Senior Play Rehearsal, 7-00 
p. m. in Chapel. 

15 — Mettawampe Trek to Mt. 
Lincoln. Leave Amherst 
House on 1-07 p. m. car for 
Pelham. 

16 — Vesper Service in Chapel. 
5 p.m. Rev. Philip S. Moxom 
of Springfield. 

18— Stockbridge Club in Agricul- 
tural Room. 

Senior Play Rehearsal in 
Chapel, 7-00 p. m. 




Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Pom Off lot. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY.JAN.il. No. 13 

Bills for back subscriptions have 
all been sent out. The Board 
wishes to close up its accounts 
before the new Board goes into 
office, which is March ist. Help 
us by remitting as soon as possible. 



With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4.00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 

Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 



The Signal wishes 
New Year. 



you a Happy 



We wish to express our sympathy 
for Dean Mills, in his sickness, and 
with our wishes go our hope for his 
speedy recovery. 



"Knock and it shall be opened unto 
you" is a text that may not always 
work when breakfast is served from 
seven until seven-thirty only. 



Communications upon timely sub- 
jects are welcome at all times but the 
Signal does not hold itself responsible 
for the opinions therein expressed. 



The Signal wishes to congratulate 
Manager Lodge on his fine schedule. 
With the strong team that is now in 
sight, a brilliant season should result, 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Irving C. Brown ex-'ll visited col- 
lege Monday and Tuesday of last 
week. Brown is now a Junior in 
Syracuse University and is studying 
chemistry. 

The 1911 Index appeared the 
Thursday before the Christmas vaca- 
tion. A goodly number of books were 
sold, but a great many of the students 
have not as yet purchased one. Every 
man should have an Index and they 
may be obtained from H. W. Blaney. 
or H. J. Baker. 

At a meeting of the College Senate, 
Thursday of last week, the rules drawn 
up by the Class of 1907 governing the 
competitive sing for next commence- 
ment were accepted. The Senate | 
voted that a Sophomore- Freshman I 
Hockey game be instituted as an an- 
nual contest. The Senate will set the 
date of the contest twenty-four hours 
ahead of the time for it to come off. 
This ruling goes into effect this year, 
so every available man in the two 
classes should be out now with the 
'varsity squad getting into practice. 
No further announcement will be made 
until the Senate posts the date of the 
contest. 

The assembly hour last Wednesday 
was taken up by a student mass meet- 
ing. Pres. Leonard of the Senate 
presided. He announced that the 
Class of 1 907 had offered a prize for 
an interclass competitive sing for 
Commencement 1910. Further par- 
ticulars of this sing will be found in 
another column. 

The matter of interclass basketball 



JAMES F. PAGE. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <£ SHOE 
REPAIRING 

,AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

Open from i a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

R. LEVI N E 

11 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



Playing Cards 



THURBER'S 

NEXT-To -1'OBT OFKICK 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants,*.etc. 



A step upward was taken by the 

Class or 1907 when it undertook to 

stimulate college singing by liberal 

prizes. It is sincerely hoped that the 1 

v _ „ -. ,, .... , „ .was taken up and it was voted that if 

"Commencement Sing" will be hailed ! . 

u .u » j ♦ u a , arrangements could be made, that a 
w th enthusiasm by the student body. , ,_ , . , 4U n 

, series of interclass basketball games 
Not one of us will deny that our col- „ ,. 

_. . , ,. be run off this winter, 
ege needs strengthening along these 

6 , , The meeting was turned over to 

lines and when the open door is placed I _, , ° . . _ 

, it Mer. F. L. Thomas of the Tennis 

before us, let s enter and grasp the 6 .. 

A11 , * .Team for the election of Asst. Mgr. 
opportunity. All classes get busy and , u _ |l U _ I#I „, vl/ „ fa . f M „ cc 

bring out the talent that we know is 



Congress Cards, all backs, 50c 

Bridge Cards, 50c and 25c 

500 Cards, 50 Pinochle. 15C 

Bicycle, Indicator and Squeezers, 

Kach 25c 

Be sure and see the new Rud- Bridge 
Card, club linen and velour, 

Kach 25c 

Bridge 500 Score Pads 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



there. 



Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck has been 
detained at his home for some time 
by illness. He expects to resume his 
work at Yale in a few weeks. 



J. Morrill Heald of Watertown, Mass 
was elected. 

A business meeting of the Debating 
Club was held Wednesday, Jan. 5, 
and various changes were made in the 
constitution and schedule. They have 
divided the year up into three terms, 



Deuel's Drug Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 11, 1910. 



electing officers each term. As no 
man can hold office twice the same 
year, this will give many more men 
the advantage of leadership in debat- 
ing. An effort is to be made to get 
more men interested in the club, es- 1 
pecially old men who have dropped 
out. As a new credit system has 
been obtained through the influence of 
Mr. McKay, whereby men taking part 
in the work of the club shall get credit 
in the English department, there 
should be much more interest taken in 
the club. Men desiring to enrol for 
such credit work should give their 
names to Mr. McKay. There will be 
an election of officers for next term, 
Wednesday, Jan. 12, 



'04. — Born, Dec. 17, in Temple- 
ton, a son to Mr. and Mrs. L. F. 
Henshaw. Mr. Henshaw visited col- 
lege Dec. 21. He has been stationed 
in Alaska the last three summers by 
the U. S. Geological Survey, with 
winter service In Washington. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



Of 



C. R. ELDER 



Folsom '10 



Nickless 'io 



Ag;gie 



Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers '12 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

■DON'T KICK" if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Dropper. 
Get the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill It." 

Guaranteed to give satisfac- 



tion. 



SOLD BY 



E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



PROSPECTIVE DEVELOPMENT. 

The meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the college was held in Boston 
during the first week in January. 
President Butterfield emphasized the 
need of new buildings very strongly, In 
his address at that meeting, and in 
cases where new buildings could not 
be expected, the necessity of enlarge- 
ment of the present equipment was 
indicated. It was stated that plans 
had been presented by Mr. Warren H. 
Manning for a dormitory of the bunga- 
low type, "which could be built at a 
low cost, and still be substantial and 
convenient." The accommodations 
for students in the library were already 
overtaxed, the stack-room was inade- 
quate, and plans for a library building 
in the form of a memorial to the late 
President Henry H. Goodell had been 
offered and recommended. The ex- 
tension and growth of the division of 
agriculture greatly increased the need 
of a modern building with its class- 
room, laboratory and office facilities, 
devoted exclusively to agriculture. 
Professor Foord is now working on 
plans for such a building and it Is 
expected that they will be presented 
to the Legislature of 1911. 

Among other new buildings for 
which plans have already been ar- 
ranged are : a stock-judging pavilion, 
a dairy building, a poultry plant, and a 
fruit storage building. Class-rooms 
could be fitted up in each of these 
buildings, and other arrangements ; 
could be made which would solve their 
respective problems and expedite the ' 
work of administration. The work of 
the dairy department, for instance, has 
been seriously curtailed because of the 
lack of facilities, and the number of 
men in the short courses who could 
elect dairying had to be limited. All 
of these departments are important 
branches of agriculture in Massachu- 
setts, an.l the granges, other organiza- 
tions and individuals are constantly 
increasing in their inquiries and 
demands of the college. 

The crowded condition of the dining- 
hall and the increasing number of 
entering students each year, has made 
it necessary to complete plans calling 
for an appropriation of $20,000. This 
would make additions possible in the 
kitchen, serving room and dining 
room, increasing the seating capacity 
of the dining room to about 500. 

The committee on buildings and 
grounds have been shown the need of 
enlargement in the department of 
chemistry of the experiment station, 
and have recommended that the plan 
i of the lower floor of the building be 
changed and that one story be added 
to the rear portion of the building. 

The demands of the movement for 
introducing agriculture Into the public 
schools, for correspondence courses, 
for lectures, advice and assistance are 
rapidly increasing, and the burden of 
supervising these various details, can 
only be undertaken by the respective 
departments, when an adequate equip- 1 
mer,t is furnished. 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Kail Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
1 1 atters, 
Tailors. 



fir. Bowker's 
New Book.w 



"Plant Food, It's Sources, Conservation, Preparation and 
Application", prepared in response to .1 clrinaiul h.r a practical 
treatise on the subject <>\ c o m mer cial fertiliser! and fertili/<r 
materials, is now ready and will he mailed free to any address 
It affords a broad, comprehensive review of the whole subject, 
stripped ol technicalities, and will lie valuable to ever student 
of If. A. C. 

Study the plant food problem 



This book will help. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CrlATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum ar\d High Streets, 



Hartford, Conn,. 



Onelblock from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing I'.ushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkr S. Gardk. 



£&rp*rvter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January n, 19' °- 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 11, 1910. 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL. SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 

Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - 5«2-5° 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - f IIS ° 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - *io.oo 

Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - *9- 00 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - *9 00 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - j9 00 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - »9-°° 

Rain Cloth, $3-5° P er y d - 'l™usenngs, $3-5° Per y ard - 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



HOUSING STUDENT BODY 

[Continued from first page.] 



A. P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 



N 



Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

rjp" Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M.D. OILMAN. C. A. MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents | 



$1.00 

6 

6 

6 

25 



" dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

" dates 3Ct. pieces socts. 

" dates nickel cents 2scts. 

" Broken Hank and Confederate 



Bills $1.00 

8en<l for my Monthly Mail Auction Circulars and 

Selling price list. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numlemuttst, 
19 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



What would be the effect of such a 
system upon the college as a whole ? I 
think it would be of the best. I 
doubt if It would lessen college spirit 
in the least. All students would come 
together three times a day for meals. 
The Social Union, having the support 
of all non-fraternity men and most 
fraternity men would never allow col- 
lege spirit to wane. The fraternity 
men, coming in contact as they do, 
with men from other colleges through 
fraternity channels, would bring to M. 
A. C. a broadening Influence which 
agricultural students need. 

The above scheme should in no way 
interfere with the maintenance of 
strong debating or technical societies. 
I think that the history of the larger in- 
stitutions bears this out, in fact, most 
of the strongest men and active work- 
ers in such societies are fraternity men. 
I believe, also, that many of the 
evils of fraternity life such as wasting 
time, carrousing, excessive drinking, 
etc., will never be as prevalent in tech- 
nical colleges as in classical colleges. 
I wish to emphasize this point. I 
think we have to draw quite a sharp 
line between those two classes of 
colleges. 

Most technical men, particularly in 
agricultural colleges, are attending 
college with a serious purpose which 
tends to keep them away from the 
ultra-social tendencies which are to be 
found in some of the fraternities of 
many of our classical colleges. 

It has been my observation, also, 
that drinking and carousing are as 
prevalent, if not more so, among 
dormitory men as compared with men 
living in fraternity houses, so that this 
objection cannot be raised against 
fraternity men any more than against 
non-fraternity men. 

What is the effect of the fraternity 
system upon the individual student ? 

Here lies one of the greatest argu- 
ments in favor of fraternities, their 
beneficial effect upon the individual 
student. All men are social beings, 
and it is the duty of an educational 
institution to promote and guide the 
social side of a man's nature as well as 
merely his intellectual side. It is 
natural for all bodies of men to be di- 
vided into small groups for social pur- 
poses. This would take place even 
though there were domitories only. A 
student has a longing to know a few 
men well; to have a few intimate 
friends. Doesn't a college fraternity 
give him an excellent opportunity to 
decide what group of men he shall 
choose as his friends? 

Men living in domitories, as a rule, 
do not have the advantages of the en- 
couragement or restraint which close 
friends have upon each other. This 
is a settled question with fraternities. 
It is obvious that it is to the interest of 
every man in a fraternity to restrain 
his brothers from wrong doing and to 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 

S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



j«E. N. PARISEAU.j* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &S0N 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 
FEED STABLES 



Before ordering your horses for 
Proms and other occasions call on 



\ H. WARREN 
c£ SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 




THOMPSOH 



Sporting Goods 

Store and 

Repair Shop. 



Don't strain your 
eyes by using a kero- 
sene lamp or an elec- 
tric lamp hung in the 

center of the room. 

Call and see our 
full line of Portable 
Electric Lamps at 
$2.50 up. 

3 handsome Read 
ing Lamps at a very 
low price. 

Coat and vest pock- 
et lights. All prices. 

Batteries and Kl- 
ectrical Novelties. 



MAKf c 



encourage them to do those things 
which are most worth while. 

In regard to student finances, I ad- 
mit that it is more expensive to live in 
a fraternity house. The relative ex- 
pense, however, will not be as great as 
among fraternity men of classical col- 
leges. 

Many pages might be written upon 
the subject of membership in a college 
fraternity as a good financial invest- 
ment (I do not refer to obtaining good 
positions through fraternity pull). The 
additional amount of interlectual 
stimulus which a man gets in coming 
into daily contact with his fellow frater- 
nity men in his own college and other 
colleges, gives him an intellectual 
equipment worth many, many times 
its cost in dollars and cents. 
Arthur W. Gilbert, Ph. D. '04. 
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 



REGISTRATION IN SHORT 
COURSES 

Jan. 4th marked the beginning of 
the ten weeks Short course. The 
registration this year is very encour- 
aging and shows a great increase over ' 
previous years. Professor Hurd has 
organized the work so well that the 
classes in all of the courses are now 
well under way. In all. there are 63 
students registered for the Short 
courses. They come from all parts 
of the state, the majority from the 
farming districts. 

The most popular courses seem to 
be those in Soil Fertility and in Live 
Stork Feeding and Management. 
The registration in the different courses 
is as follows: Soil Fertility. 60; 
Market Gardening, 19; Fruit Growing, 
31; Floriculture, 10; Field Crops, 27 ; 
Breeds of Live Stock and Animal 
Breeding, 35 ; Live Stock Feeding 
and Management, 39; Animai 
Diseases and Stable Sanitation, 23 ; 
Dairying, 29; Dairy Bacteriology, 
15; Botany. 25; Entomology, 25; 
Mechanics, 19; Farm Accounts, II; 
Farm Buildings and Machinery, 10. 



E. A. Thompson 



Rear of First Nat Bank. 



1911 INDEX 

The appearance of the Index before 
Xmas was surely a satisfaction. The 
book was pulished by the Andover 
Press, Andover. The cover is done 
in brown and white and the printing in 
a brown double toned ink. President 
Butterfield was given the honors of 
dedication. As to the make up of the 
book, it closely resembles the many 
other Indexes in form and place of 
material. Original features were lack- 
ing with the exception that an attempt 
to carry out Old English drawings was 
made. This idea would have been 
fine if only all the drawings had all 
been done in the same style. Prob- 
ably the deepest criticism is due the 
publishers. Typographical errors were 

many, cuts badly put in and general 
signs of carelessness shown. Never 
theless the book is good, and deserves 
our credit. This article is written from 
a critical stand point so we have let 
the many good points pass by. 



T. 1^. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Something for M. A. C. Students. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

Tailor and Presser, 

Foreign and Domestic Woolens, 

Suits and Overcoats to order, 
All Goods of the Best Material, 

And to be Tailored in the Best Style, 

Full Dress Suits for Kent. 
Fine Line of Gentlemen's Furnishings, 

Conit Early and get Satisfaction. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 pairs of Pants £1.50. 

Clothing pressed by term at regular price payable in advance 

Store 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 

Telephone 54-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 4 ^ 




1- 1 .i tirnil y 


and ^Mi V 


MM 


Invitations C*^^^j 


( lass Inserts 


Mentis j 


*m 


for Annuals 


Leather Dance ^^ 

( ases and 11 ^^ 

V ji 

Covers V ^jVj 


1 laternitv 

and 'lass 

Stationery 


Wedding Invitations and 


Calling < 'ards 



WORKS, 17th STREET A LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January n, 19'°- 



T 



CREDIT 



FOR DEBATING CLUB farmers something about the market 
WORK which Springfield affords. 



•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.'.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.■••.•.•••••■■•••■•'•••'••■'•••'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'■'•'•'•'■'•'•'•'•' 

GOODS FOR MEN. 



A project has been passed by the 
Committee on Instruction and the 
faculty of the English Department 



A feature of the campaign will be 
the meetings which it is planned to 
hold in the evenings at large commu- 




gran.ing, credit fcr sophomore, junior, ' nities in the midst of farming sections 
and senior work in the Debating Club, where a good audience coul 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



..■.•.■.•.■.•.•.•.■.•,•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•••••••■•••.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.'. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 
A Specialty <>f College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Re pah ins « Specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C *82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Block, AMHERST, Mats. 



There has been for some time a 
general desire to secure the varied 
experience which such a club offers 
during the course of a year, expressed 
among students who felt that they could 
not spare the time and energy required 
without receiving a credit recompense 
for the same. This arrangement is 
designed to meet the needs of such 
students, as well as to recognize the 
work now being done by members of 
the club. A credit of one hour is 
given for attendance upon twenty meet- 
ings of the club, and the completion of 
certain other requirements as to 
amount and quality of work. Those 
who have been sophomore members 
this year may apply their credit rrxt 
June in place of a one-hour course in 
Public Speaking next semester, while 
juniors ana seniors may apply it in 
place of any English work which they 
would otherwise take. 

For this year the granting of credit 
is an experiment, and "is not to be 
construed as a precedent for granting 
such credit in 1910 -1911." How- 
ever, 1 believe the experiment will 
work satisfactorily, and if so, I see no 
reason why the granting of credit should 
not be continued. Students wishing 
to avail themseives of club privileges 
may apply for membership at any time. 
For further information, see H. J. 
Baker, '11, President, A. C. Brett, 
'12. Secretary, or club members, or 
the Instructor in Public Speaking. 

F. B. McKay. 



counted on. At these meetings, sub- 
jects of vital interest to the tarmers 
will be considered. The grangers in 
the Western part of the state, where 
they are active and important, can be 
counted upon for strong help. Tne 
plan is one that is important and sure 
to have far-reaching results. 



Holland's Block. 



STEAM MTTIMG, 

G \> Hi I ING, TINNING 



Phoenix Row 



Telephone 59—4- 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or c:ill. 

E. B DICKINSON D. D S. 

DBNTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

On I' 1 1 lot 
BtolHA.Mi i.notfi.ti'.M. 



\ -]>.-ci.ilt\ of Repairing 

CftURCH Windows, 

Memorial Windows, 
LEAD Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



Ktlier and Nitrous 
stered when desired 



Oxide ( ias admin- 



BEST FARM IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, hath room, 
hot and cold water: best farm in this 
section, running spring water; 40 acres 
tillage. 20 pasture, some wood and tim 
ber; plenty of fruit and many other good 
features. $6000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 

W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST, MASS. 



OUR COLLEGE ON WHEELS 

A campaign for the education of 

farmers of Western Massachusetts in 

up-to-date methods of farming is to be 

undertaken by our college early in the 

spring. This new departure in the 

! work our institution is only possible | 

! because of the co-operation of the 

Springfield Street Railway Company 

and the Springfield Board of Trade. 

Many excellent plans are now under 
way. Three cars will be furnished bv 
the trolley company and these will bo- 
used to carry the exhibit, apparatus and 
men who will accompany the expedi- 
tion. StOf/S wili be made at about a 
dozen towns. The places which are 
being considered as probable places 
for demonstrations and exhibits lie as 
far West as Huntington and as far 
East as Charlton City. 
""■~— — — — A corps of lectures, wiii accompany 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Finer, the exhibition mostly ; nstru f rs trom , 

our college. Several students will 
also be taken along to assist in explain- 
ing the exhibits and to help carry out 
the demonstrations. The Springfield 
Board of Trade is also planning to send 
one or more representatives in addi- 
tion to one or two Springfield whole 
salers, who will be 



J. H. TROTT 



Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-1*. 



M. A. C. LITERARY MONTHLY 

On Feb. 1st the first issue of the 
M. A. C. Literary Monthly will appear. 
Work of organization has been in 
progress for sometime and many diffi- 
culties presented themselves. These 
have been met and now a subscription 
canvass is being made of the students 
and faculty. It is very gratifying to 
the Board to note the response to the 
call, and there seems to be no doubt 
but that the magazine w.ll get along 
financially. 

Tne Board at present consists of 
the following men : Louis Brandt '10, 
editor-in-chief; Walter R. Clarke '10, 
Bernard Ostrolenk '1 1 and Royal N. 
Haliowell '12. associate editors, and 
k L. Tnomas '10, business 
manager. 

RIFLE CLUB MEETS 

The annual election of officers of 
the Rifle Club was held Jan. 5 and the 
following officers for the ensuing year 
were elect* d: President, A. H. 
Thorpe 1911; secretary, H. C. 
Walker 1912; treasurer, P. A. 
IRacicot 1911; captain, A.C.Brett 
\ 1912. 

The plans for the year were dis- 
1 cussed and include weekly indoor 
matches in a ten team league of col- 
leges and held under the direction of 
the National Rifle Association. Men 
prominent in rifle shooting are to 
address the Club during the year. 

-T*- „ „ ...ill |*%«»tt«#ttf et***h *-»-» *»n nc Rrirr 
r win iiiuiuu«- aUwII ii.*... «-« _.. b - 

Gen. George W. Wingate of New 
York, an active organizer of rifle clubs 
land Capt. Wise, Inspector of Rifle 
I Practice 6th Regt. M . V. M . and Capt. 
of Mass. State team. Their subjects 
will be conditions governing rifle shoot- 
ing and should be interesting as well 
as instructive. The indoor range has 
been remodeled and a system of lights 
installed. New subchamber Spring- 
field rifles have been purchased. 

The interest which is being shown in 
the shooting is very encouraging. A 
successful season last year has put the 
sport upon a firm basis in the college. 
Ail the men on last year's teams are 
in college and with a few men of the 
freshman class showing up well we 
have fine prospect of landing both 
intercollegiate championship matches 
this year. 



'03.— Wm. L. Hood, Manager of 
able to tell the Bear Creek Stock Farm, Sterretts, Ala. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 11, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent rotes, 
carnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg.. 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A '/. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the AMHERST 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



STUDENT VOLUNTEER CON- 
VENTION. 

The Sixth International Student Vol- 
unteer Convention held at Rochester, 
N. Y,, Dec. 29th to Jan. 2d last was 
attended by four representatives from 
M. A. C. — three from the students, 
W. S. Baker '13, R. W. Wales ' 1 2, 
and H. J. Baker Ml, and one from 
the faculty, F. B. McKay. Approxi- 
mately 4000 students and professors 
were in attendance representing over 
700 higher institutions of learning in 
the United States and Canada, while 
practically tVr-ry foreign country of 
importance was represented. The re- 
port given by the delegates before the 
Y. M. C. A. last week showtd the 
convention to be one of great spiritual 
power and unbounded enthusiasm. 
"The evangtl ztion of the world in 
this generation," was the motto of the 
big meeting a^ it la of the movement 
itself. Its primary object is to stimu- 
late an Interest in missions among col- 
lege students and to secure volunteers 
for the foreign field. The report of 
John R. Mott on the second day 
showed that since the beginning of the 
movement in 1886, 4,346 volunteers 
have sailed under the Mission Boards 
of various churches, that over $130, 
000 a year are contributed to these 
purposes by the students of North 
America, and that there are now scores 
of colleges and schools each support- 
ing entirely or in large part its own 
representative on the foreign field. 

The addresses of such speakers as 
Ambassador James Bryce of Washing- 
ton, Julius Richtef of Germany, S. M. 
Zwemer of Arabia, H. P. Beach ot 
China, J. C. Harzeil of Africa, Robert 
E. Speer, John R. Mott, George S. 
Eddy, and others made it apparent that 
the missionary is one of the greatest 
factors in the civilization and uplift of 
the backward peoples of to-day. 

The report of the delegation showed 
that in some of our colleges from one- 
half to three-fourths of the whole student 
body are actively engaged in mission- 
ary study, As a result this work will 
probably be started at M. A. C. in the 
near future. 

The last paragraph of Mr. Mott's re- 
port as chairman contains the pith of 
the whole movement. " Above all, 
the college men and college women 

throughout our whole field must be led 
to surrender themselves wholly to Jesus 
Christ as Lord and to let Him deter- 
mine their life decisions and dominate 
them in every relationship. The great 
question which must be pressed insis- 
tently upon them is not the question of 
whether or not they will become mis- 
sionaries, not the relative claims of the 
home and foreign fields, but the one 
crucial, all-important question whether 
or not they wiil yield to Christ His right- 
ful place as the Lord and Master of 
their lives. In proportion as the stu- 
dents of our day are influenced to an- 
swer affirmatively and whole heartedly 
this question of questions will be the 
realization of the sublime purpose of 
the Volunteer Movement — to give to 
all men in our day an adequate oppor- 
tunity to know and to receive the Liv- 
ing Christ." 




THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD. CONN*. 



THOMAS 



PHOSPHATE POWDER 



(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 



SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 

At the Great Pruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 18-24, K )°9- fruit grown on Thomas Phos 
phate Powder, (Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, lour 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit ums raised l>\ .Mi:. 
Geokgi \ Drew, <>f Connecticut, M. A. C < lass 
of 1897. (Our pamphlet " Up To Date FruitGrow- 
ing M is sent free if von mention Tin ( 'olUgt Signal.) 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



We also distribute from Huston. Mul. Belfast, Mi-., Baltimore, 
Md.. Wilmington, N.< '., Savannah, Gn., and < nai leston, S.C. 



TURKISH 



BLEND 



FATIMA 

20 for 15 cts. O 



'THE College Tavern. Happy hours. 
Splendid chaps. Old romances. 
Pleasant recollections — 
and Fatima Cigarettes. 

The Turkish Cigarette of 
distinction. A blend of mild, 
mellow, full-flavored tobacco 
exquisitely pleasing to the taste. 

The American Tobacco Co. 





The College Signal, Tuesday, January n, 



>9 



10. 



COMMENCEMENT SING 

[Continued from first page.] 

or members of the class presenting the 
song. 

8. Five judges selected in the fol- 
lowing manner shall have full charge 
of awarding the prizes: 

Two to be selected by the College 
Senate prior to May 1st. 

Three to be selected by the com- 
mittee representing the class of 1907. 
(Signed) 

George H. Chapman. 
John N. Summers. 
Ralph J. Watts. 
Committee representing the class of 

1907. 
Amherst, Mass., January 5, 1910. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Below is a list of courses offered by the College for the first time in 
,909-1910. Several other courses have been greatly amplified and extended. 
In the Department of Agricultural Education: 



Seminar in Education. 



In the Division of Agriculture: 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 

The department of Pomology has 
exchanged collections of apples with 
the following colleges: Oregon, Wis- 
consin, Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas, 
Michigan. North Carolina, Pennsylva- 
nia, Rhode Island. Connecticut, New 
York. In each case a bushel box was 
sent out and about that quantity 
received in return. Professor Dickens The College Senate, 



Making, Manufactured Milk Products 

In the Department of Chemistry: 

Advanced Analysis, Chemistry of Sugar Making and Refining. 

In the Division of Horticulture: 

The literature of Horticulture Practical *jn.ol««x ( ?I *cial> ^^SoSZ x &** BBd C °* 
(tmctkm, Pall GraealMSM Crop*, theory ot Landscape Art. Ornamental l.araening. 

In the Division of Humanities: 

Department of Language and Literature— P„,i n rfi ra l Wnt- 

, ,,in,n K COOT* rio-bk courses Agncultura. .K^f fc ^"Fl^XtT 1, . tenure I'un 
IDC, Proseminar in lournali.m (i „,.Mr course;. In di vidua II K*^' 1 " 1 ^ ' m uufl" t"ieliteeiitli Century 
t..n and Kestoration Literature, Bub Eight** "thC.n tu ryUljn Hire, M »«£^ft Century Liter- 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



I 



9 



Department of Political Science— 

Economic History, The History of New England, 



The History of Ideals. 

In the Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Civil Engineering: 

Analytic Mechanics, Descriptive Geometry. 

In the Department of Physical Education and Hygiene: 

Hygiene. Elementary Gymnastics. Graded Gymnastics. Heavy (iymanastics, I ra.n.ngCourse, 
Advanced Gymnastics. 

In the Department of Rural Social Science: 

Elements of Agricultural Economics. Historical and Comparative Agriculture. Sptdfc Pi* 
bl.-ms in Agricultural Economics, Seminar -(double course). 

The term "double course" indicates th at the course is given for both semesters of the year. 

SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E 



Amherst, Mass. 



of Kansas, in acknowledging the box 
sent to him, makes the following com- 
ments which are certainly interesting : 
" Please accept the appreciation of my 
class for the apples. We worked on 
the Palmer Greening today and two 
of the eight in the class declared It 
the 'best apple they had ever eaten," 
and they know Grimes Golden and 
Huntsman quite well too. I took a 
team of my boys up to the National 
Horticultural Congress at Council 
Bluffs last week for the judging con- 
test but could not do better than sec- 
ond place. There was some good 
fruit there but your Mcintosh, Sutton 
and Palmer Greening would have been 
in it for a ribbon. I did not see any 
Suttons as fine as yours." 

DAIRY. 

The Massachusetts Creamery Asso- 
ciation will meet here Jan. 19, 1910. 
Along with this meeting of the associ- 
tion, we expect to have an exhibit of 
dairy machinery and utensils, in the 
Drill Hall. The program has not 
been completed, but we expect to 
have with us at least two men from 
the Dairy department at Washington. 
The De Laval Separator Company 
has recently given to the Dairy depart- 
ment a new hand separator, cut away 
in such a manner as to show the com- 
plete working parts. 



Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Nneteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Debating Club, 



Leonard, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 
J. F. Adams, Manager 
G. A. Lodge. Jr.. Manager 
R. S. Eddy. Manager 
L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 
H. W. Blaney, Manager 
F. A. Castle, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 
R. H. Allen. President 
L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 
H. W. French, President 
H. J. Baker, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AGOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Care at Reasonable Rate* 

AMHERST & SUNDtRLAND SI. RK. CO. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUM. LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving Q. Davis, A$ent, 12 Xorth 



M 



Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

* 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol.. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 18, 1910. 



No. 14 



MUSIC RECITALS 



Tomorrow Afternoon Violoncello 
cital by Frederick Blair. 



Re- 



On Wednesday, Jan. 19, at 4-30 
the first of the series of afternoon con- 
certs will be held in the M. A. C. 
chapel. In arranging these concerts 
we have been extremely fortunate in 
securing first class Boston and New 
York artists, who have given us special 
consideration in regard to prices, com- 
ing to us for much less than what they 
receive in larger centres. The soprano 
soloist, Miss Buliard, gives recitals in 
Steinerr Hall, Boston, and tickets are 
one dollar and more. The pianist, 
Mr. Salmon, as well as the cellist, Mr. 
Blair, has given an especially low price 
and for this reason those connected 
with M. A. C. are enabled to hear 
these three artists here in Amherst for 
what a ticket for a single concert in 
Boston would cost. The prices of the 
students' tickets shows that the con- 
certs are arranged primarily for them. 

It Is hoped, therefore, that officers 
and students will give these concerts 
their deserved support, and show that 
M. A. C. is as ready to support the 
aesthetic at.d higher forms of art as 
any other institution. 

As may be seen from the announce- 
ment, the programs have been care- 
fully arranged in order to cover definite 
and interesting fields of music. 

Tickets may be obtained from mem 
bers of the class in music and at the 
chapel on the afternoon of the concert. 
The matter of attendance of officers of 
the institution and student body will 
largely determine the future of such 
affairs, as we can not depend upon the 
general public to support them. 



HARD GAME AT WILLIAMS ASSOCIATION MEETING 



Fast Purple Team Proves Too Much for 
Aggie Boys. Score 10 too. 

By fast heavy playing, Williams 
defeated our hocky team at Williams- 
town on Saturday by a score of 10 to 
0. In the first ten minutes of play the 
"Aggie" boys gave the Purple some 
hard work and four or five unsuccessful 
attempts were made at Williams goal. 
The team showed a brilliant dash of 
pluck and co-operation that had not 
before characterizing its playing and it 
looked for those few minutes like M. 
A. C.'s victory but the team that bids 
fair to make the championship of New 
England suddenly found Itself and by a 
mass play witnin ten yards of the cage 
shot a goal. Finding this was our 
weak point thev made rush after rush 
scoring six tallies in the first half and 
four in the second. Their skating was 
strong and brilliant. The roughness 
of the ice, bothered the visitors a good 
deal. 

Tne individual features of the game 
were the goal shooting ot Van Gorder 
and Benton of the Williams team and 
the fine work of Capt. Brandt of the 
Aggies. The afternoon was a fine one 
for the game and about 40u watched 
it. The line-up was as follows: — 



WILLIAMS. 

Curtiss. g. 
Peterson. Oliver, p. 
Michael. Olcutt. c. p. 
Hurlbut r. 



MASSACHUSETTS 

g . Ackerman 

p , Moir 

c. p , Adams 

r , Peckman 



GAME ROOM. 

The students are well pleased with 
the progress being made in the new 
addition to the Social Union. We 
are very fortunate in having been 
able to procure the combination of 
tables which we have. Two billiard 
and one pool table have been bought 
of Mr. Stack of Conway and are be- 
ing set up. The tables are second 
hand but in fine condition. Mr. 
Stack has recovered them all and has 
furnished cues, and cue racks, and 
all other accessories. The tables 
will be ready to play on in a few 
days. Card tables will be furnished 
in a short time. This gives the game 
room an excellent equipment and 
should be fully appreciated by every 
student. Every man should do his 
best to keep the room in good order. 



Van Gorder. c c . Brandt (Capt.) Heath 

J Ely. Pratt. I. w. I. w.. Sanctuary 

Beiton, (Capt ) r. w r. w., Bentley, Brewer 

Score— Williams 10. M. A. CO. Coals 

— Van Gorder 4. Benton 5. Ely. Referees 

— Peacock of Pittsfield and Converse of 
Williams. Time— 15-minute halves. 



ASSEMBLY 

The college band, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Short from Springfield, 
rendered a very striding program in 
the Chapel Wednesday during Assem- 
bly hour. Due appreciation was shown 
by the enthusiastic applause after each 
selection. The interest was so intense 
that it was quite difficult for Mr. Short 
to bring his concert to a close. 

PROGRAM. 

Mignonette 

De Molay Connady 

American Students 

Jenny Jones 

Sweet Thoughts 

Bits of Romics Hits 

The American Musician 

M. AC. Medley 



Overture. 
March, 
Waltzes. 
Cornet Solo, 
Serenade. 
Medley, 
March, 
Fin lie. 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



'09.— O. B. Briggs, Manager, 
Bonnie Brae Farms, Sheffield, The 
farms produce certified milk. 



The target range in the drill hall has 
been opened this last week and prac- 
tice commenced. The hour are from 
1 to 6 p. m. except on Saturday when 
they are from 8-30 a. m. to 12 m. 
Officers will be in charge during those 
hours. 



Prof. Waugh Talks on "Jobs". Recep- 
tion to Short Course Men. 

The speaker at the Y. M. C. A. 
meeting last Thursday evening was- 
Prof. F. A. Waugh. He spoke on 
that subject which is of interest to all 
college men — "Jobs." His address 
in part follows: 

"Undergraduates and especially 
Seniors realize that their college days 
are but a time of play compared with 
holding a job, and they are all very 
anxious about getting positions. Do 
not worry over this latter point; very, 
very few college men that deserve jobs, 
are out of them ; in fact there are 
many lazy ones that have jobs also. 
Nevertheless the question of a job is a 
good one to consider. 1 have a few 
suggestions to make on that point. 

"In the first place, the best and 
quickest way to get a job, is to have 
work of some sort. No one wants to 
hire a man that loafs about waiting for 
something to turn up. On the other 
hand, the mere fact that a man is at 
work Is a recommendation. There- 
fore, first get a job without special 
reference to salary. The job may be 
a mean one. it wnl oOMe at a time 
when a man is least prepared for mean 
work, and it may be under a man of 
comparatively little education, but the 
new man must 'make good' and be 
loyal to his superior. 

"In the second place, stick to a job 
for a long time. There is more in a 
job than a living, for a man's charac- 
ter is formed by his everyday work. 
Religion is gotten out of work rather 
than out of church going, and the kind 
of work and the manner in which he 
does his work, make a man'scharacter. 
1 would suggest in the third Dlace that 
you look upon your work in the light of 
a public service. The best, a man 
can do, is to do plain, everyday work 
honestly, and this is in itself a public 
service. I believe that an agricultural 
college education tends to develope 
this idea of service more than a 
'classical' training does, but this is of 
course debatable ground. A mere liv- 
ing is not the only aim of a college 
man ; he is ambitious to make good 
and to do something worth while. In 
closing >l would say, look upon your 
work as a public service and as a 
moulder of your character, and offer 
your work as your contribution toward 
public welfare." 

After the address there was an 
informal reception to the Short Course 
men, about 35 of whom were present. 
The college orchestra played some 

selections, refreshments were served, 
and after some informal conversation, 
the meeting broke up. 



Jan. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

9—4-30 p. m. in Chapel, Violon- 
cello Recital by Frederick 
Blair of Schubert String Quar- 
tet assisted by J. Albert Baum- 
gartner, pianist. 

7 00 P. M. in Agricultural Lec- 
ture Room, Club Meeting. 

Jtn 20—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. Leader 
Schermerhorn '10, 
500 p. m. meeting of the Sen- 
ior Class in chapel. 

Jan. 21—7-00 p. m. Senior Class 
Play Rehersal in Chapel. 

Jan. 22 — 6-30 p. m. Union entertain- 
ment in Chapel, Arthur Beard 
Concert Company. 

Jan. 23 — 5-00 p. m. in Chapel, Vesper 
Service, Rev. Herbert J. 
White of Hartford, Conn, 
25— Stockbridge Club Meeting at 
7-00 p. m. 

Senior Class Play Rehersal in 
Chapel. 



Jan. 



MASS MEETING 
Last Tuesday evening the student 
body held a mass meeting to protest 
against the proposed increase in the 
price of board at the dining hall. Mr. 
Kenney, the treasurer of the college, 
said that, according to his records, the 
college had been paying $4.01 a 
week for board while charging only 
$3.75 to the students. At the present 
time the books showed a deficit of 
over $1600 and it seemed as if the 
rate to the students must be raised. 
Several men spoke of the present 
wasteful methods at present In force at 
the dining hall. Statistics were read 
which showed that boarding houses in 
town, paid more for supplies than the 
college does, and yet were able to run 
the business more cheaply than the 
college. Several boarding-houses that 
charged a rate of five dollars, while 
paying more for raw supplies than the 
college, were able to make an average 
profit of one dollar and fifty cents. 
This brings their rate to $3.50 in com- 
parison to that of $3.75 of the dining 
hail. It was finally decided to appoint 
a committee of two to investigate and 
make suggestions. President Leonard 
of the Senate appointed to the com- 
mittee Hazen MO, and Blaney 'I I. 



The Senior class held a meeting on 
last Friday, to arrange for the next 
graduation and Commencement. 
The class elected Louis Brandt, — 
music master to take charge of the 
class's part in the Commencement 
sing. A program committee was 
appointed consisting of W. E.Leonard, 
E. F. Damon, R. H. Allen to arrange 
fo<- programs and invitation and a cap and 
gown committee consisting of Pres. 
W. R. Clarke and Sec. H. T. Cowles. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, January 18, 19 10. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R.CLARKE. 1910. 
ARTHUR H. SHARPE. 1911, 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910. 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 191 I, 



Editor-in-Chief. 
Asst. Editor. 
College Notes. 
Athletic Notes. 
Alumni Notes. 
Department Notes. 



Hall is an institution for students. 
Why force groups of men or fraterni- 
ties to board themselves to get better 
food at cheaper rates. If that is 
done, we go a step backward and not 
forward. The Dining Hall is our 
common meeting ground. Let's have 
it right. A fair deal all around. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, Colleg* Notes. 

SIGNAL OPFICB HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1 - 1 5 p. m . 

Tuesday. Thursday and Fridays from t>-30 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager —Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9-15 to 10 a. m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. m. 
Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 m. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY, JAN. 18. No. 14 



Junior prom, invitations may be 
obtained from A. P. Bursley, 'n, 
16 North. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

A party consisting of twenty-two 
members of the Faculty and Station 
Staff tramped over Mt. Toby to Mon- 
tague on Dec. 18th. After dinner at 
the Montague hotel the party enjoyed 
a straw ride to Sunderland. 

Several recent alumni and ex-mem- 
bers of the college have been back to 
college this last week to attend frater- 
nity banquets. Among them being — 
R. C. Potter, B. F. Barnes and A. 
W. Hubbard '09, Eben Brown ex- '09, 
A. J. Robb ex-' 10. 

The collection of Alpine photographs 
which Professor Waugh has on exhibit 
in Wilder Hall are well worth studying. 
There are views taken by an Italian, of 
the glaciers and peaks of the Alps and 
Caucasus mountains. The collection 
is owned by the Applachian club of 
Boston. 




With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4.00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS, 



Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 

JAMES F. PAGE. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 18, 1910. 



Doubtless the score at Williams 
does not look encouraging but never- 
theless the hockey team is getting 
together and we will hear from it 
before the season is over. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Wanted — Alumni notes. Our col- 
umn under that head can oniy be a 
matter of printer's ink if news is not 
available. Alumni 'write us' tell us 
what you or your classmate or any 
other "Aggie" man is doing. Lend 
a hand. 



Playing Cards 



That co-operation is greatly needed 
at present can be clearly demonstrated 
by the condition of affairs at the Din- 
ing Hall. The fact that the board 
must be raised from $3.75 to $4.00 is 
placing the student body in a thought- 
ful attitude. The question is, can we 
afford to pay $4.00 for board as it is 
now? And what is the reason for the 
raise and how are we to know that in 
a few months another 25 cents may 
not be added? 

A committee has been 
to investigate. All departments of 
the Dining Hall are being looked into. 
If there is a leak we want to stop it. 
That is, if it's possible. To do this, 
every student must lend a hand. 
What was the matter with the old 



public speaking contests Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

The system of Public Speaking Full line oj College Jewelry 

Contests will this year be considerably 

. . Oculists prescriptions tilled 

modified and enlarged. According to 

plans now worked out, there will be 
three public contests this year, in 
declamation, oratory ani debate, car- 
rying prizes amounting to approxi- 
mately $165. 

1 . The Burnham contest in decla- 
mation will be open this year with cer- 
tain restrictions to freshmen and soph- 
omores. This contest will probably 
occur during commencement week. 
The freshmen work after the spring 
vacation will include declamation and 
will amply prepare all who wish to 

enter this contest. The first prize is Congress Cards, all hacks, 
$ 1 5 and the second $ 1 0. 

2. The Flint prize contest in ora- Hridge Cards, 50c and 25c 
tory will be open with certain restric- 
tions to all regular students of the col- 5°° Cards, 50 Pinochle 

lege. It will probably occur this year 

Bicycle, Indicator and Squeezers, 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT & SHOE 
REPAIRING 

>T 

LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 






50c 



25c 



LEVIN E 

n 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



THURBER'S 



NBXT-TO I'oHT-OFKICE 



Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



Kach 25c 



in the month of Aprii. A project is 
now under way to organize an Oratori- 
cal League composed of the Land 
Grant Colleges of New England in B« sure and see the new Rud- Hridge 

appointed which, if effected, the winner will have Card, club linen and velour, 
the honor to contest. The first prize 
is $20 in money and gold medal ; the 
second prize, $15. 

3. A contest in Debate will be 
open with certain restrictions to all 
regular students of the college. The 



If. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



Kach 25c 
Bridge 500 Score Pads 



Dining Hall committee, why not have three contestants making the highest 

another composed of two members rank will each receive $15 in money 

of the faculty and two members and a gold medal, and will constitute 

of the student body? If things the 'varsity team which will meet 

are not right give them power Bates College in debate at Amherst 



to rectify them. This committee 
might stop the waste caused by stu- 
dents and waiters and it also might 
stop dirty milk, bad butter, meat in 



next May. This contest will occur 
late in March or in April. 

These contests are arranged for the 
express purpose of giving men of 



Deuel's Drue Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



the last stages of cold storage, and | varied talents an opportunity to 
countless other things. The Dining J develop them. Every student endeav- 



ANIHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



oring to attain the art of public speak- 
ing should prepare to enter one of 
these contests. The course offered 
next semester and the work of the 
Debating Club will furnish splendid 
practice for the contest in debate. 
Course four open to sophomores and 
Course seven in the "Occasional 
Speech" open to juniors and seniors, 
will furnish a practical preparation for 
the Flint prize contest, while the fresh- 
man and sophomore courses will pre- 
pare for the Burnham prize contest. 

Doubtless many questions regarding 
these contests will arise in the minds 
of those interested, and in anticipation 
of these, Mr. McKay has arranged to 
give a talk in the chapel nexl Thursday 
evening at 8-00 o'clock. Practical 
suggestions will be given as to how to 
prepare, and plans proposed covering 
the preliminary contests and methods 
of representation In the final contests. 



'86.— On Nov. 10, C. F. W. Felt 
was appointed Chief Engineer of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Rail- 
way Co. His headquarters are at 
Topeka, Kansas. 

There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 

OK 

C. R. ELDER 



Polsom 'io 



Nickless 'io 



Aggie 



Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers '1 2 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

"DON'T KICK' if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Dropper. 
Get the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill It." 

Guaranteed to give satisfac- 
tion. 

SOLD BY 

E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



SHORT COURSE 

Alcock, James R. 
Baggs. M. C. 
Bahsler. Eugene 
Barnes, Joseph C. 
Belknap. Robert D. 
Bowditch, John P. 
Bowser, Lydia A. (Miss) 
Bradstreet, Arthur C. 
Canlett, Thomas C 
Clarke, Emerson L. 
Channing, Hayden 
Childs, Samuel W. 
Cordes, Edwin 
Cox. Harold C. 
Curtis, E. D. 
Day, H. 1. 
Dow, Aaron W. 
Dunn. Howard W. 
Eastwood, J. R. 
Edmands, Thomas R. 
Gage. E. L. 
Cray, George A. 
Harris. A. B. 
Holcomb, E. A. 
Hurd. R. O. 
Kenney. R. H. 
Ketchen. Harold B. 
Killam, John 
Koch. Mabel T.. (Mrs.) 
Lanier, Sidney 
Lemoine, Arthur A. 
Lewis, A. A. 
McCarrol!. Edward L 
Mclntyre, C. H. 
Marsh, Howard C. 
Maurer, F. J. 
ODonnell. J. C. 
Pardee, E. C. 
Pease. W. M. 
Peck. H. F. 
Perham, J. F. 
Priest, Frederick S. 
Puffer, Willis R. 
Sabine. G. K. Jr. 
Sanderson, G. K. 
Scace, Wm. 
Scott, E G. 
Searle, E. C. 
Seaver. J. D. 
Selkregg. E. R. 
Shaughnessy, T F. 
Smith. John A. 
Smith. Ralph G. 
Supple. M. W. 
Thompson, P. E. 
Torrey, L. E. 
Urann. C. B. 
Valentine, R. K. 
Vetter, R. 
Walker, E. L. 
Walker, Rena L. 
Warfield, P. G. 
Wheeler, C. O. 
Young, E. L. 



IOIO 

North Amherst 

Belchertown 

Lowell 

Lanesboro 

Amherst 

Framingham 

Cohasset 

Topsfield 

Rockport 

Milford, Conn. 

Sherborn 

Deerfield 

Great Barrington 

Wakefield 

Bantam, Conn. 

West Stockbrldge 

Bolton 

Dorchester 

North Adams 

Newton 

Gilbertville. N. Y. 



North Adams 

Simsbury, Conn. 

Westminster 

Greenwich, N. Y. 

Belchertown 

East Boxford 

Bloomfield, Conn. 

Walpole 

So. Framingham 

East Rockaway. L. I. 

Waban 

Easthampton 

Arlington 

Newton 

Belchertown 

Bolton 

Monson 

Belchertown 

Ludlow Center 

Watertown 

Concord 

Brookline 

Williamsburg 

Pittsfield 

Garfield, Wash. 

Southampton 

New Britain, Conn, 

North East. Pa. 

Marlboro 

South Westport 

Norih Amherst 

Souih Deerfield 

Brooklit.e 

Southbridge 

Bryantville 

Erie, Pa. 

North Andover 

Savoy Center 

Savoy Center 

Buckland 

Hudson 

South Hadley 



FRATERNITY BANQUETS. 

The past week has been known 
among fraternity men as "banquet 
week," all the fraternities holding 
their banquets. C. S. C held their 
banquet at the Hotel Hamilton, in 
Holyoke, Wednesday evening, Jan. 
12. John N. Summers '07, acted as 
toastmaster. 

On Friday evening three of the 
fraternities made merry. Kappa 
Sigma held forth at the l'rospect 
House on Amity street. Many men 
from other chapters were in attend- 
ance. The toastmaster, was Prof. 
!• A. Waugh of the college. 

Q. T. V. had their banquet at the 
Amherst House, while Theta Phi 
were at the Draper in Northampton. 
Prof. .\. Y. Osmun '03 served as 
toastmaster of the former, H. T. 




^w 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. ('. students 

With the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



fir. Bowker's 
New Book.w 



"Flant Food, It's Sources, Conservation, Preparation and 

Application", prepared to reaponae to a demand §et a practical 

treatise on the subject of commercial fertilizer! and fertiliser 
materials, is now ready and will be mailed free to any address. 
It aiforda a broad, comprehenaire review of the whole subiec 1, 
stripped of technicalities, and will be valuable to ever student 
of M. A. C. 

Study the plant food problem 

'litis book will help. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum, arid High, Streets, 



Hartford, Corti]. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing liushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modem hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

banquets a specialty. Walter S. Garde. 



£&rp{tvter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 18, 1910. 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 

$12.50 
$11.50 
$10.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 

*3-5° i* 1- y ard - 



Cowles '10 for the latter. On Satur- 
day night Phi Sigma Kappa and 
Kappa Gamma Phi ended the week 
grand style. The former was at 



111 



■&' 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Rain Cloth, - $35° P er )' d - Trouserings, 



I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

t3T Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, 



10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



the Draper in Northampton. 
Joseph K. Root, '76, acted as 
master. 



Dr. 
toast- 




ffigH. 



ffl 



A GOOD THING 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



M.I), (ill. MAN. C. A. MOFKKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 
know that their shoes are 

right. 
Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E. M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 

S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips IMock 
Mass. 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 
Si. 00 

" dates 2Cts. pieces 5octs. 

■ dates 3d. pieces socts. 

" dates nickel cents 25Cts. 

" Broken Bank and Confederate 



6 
6 
6 

25 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



Bills $1. 00 

Send for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars and 
Selling price list. 



HERBERT E. 

Numismatist. 
19 WASHINGTON ST 



MOREY 



Boston. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



TRACK 

PROGRESSIVE ACTIVITY APPARENT 

The popularity of track athletics be- 
comes more manifest as the season 
draws near, a goodly number of stu- 
dents engaging in it, and a general 
student interest being apparent. An 
interval of preliminary training has 
past and resulting thinning of the squad 
has taken place. Twenty men have 
been selected as eligible to qualify and 
eleven of these men are being regis- 
tered in the N. E. A. A. A. U. Ad- 
ditional registrations will be made from 
results as recorded at the Interclass 
meet on Saturday afternoon next. 
These men have been requested to 
keep strict training and such of them 
as eat at the Dinning Hall are report- 
ing at the training table. The men 
are : S. C. Brooks, Cloues. Cowles, 
Dickinson, Damon, Barrows, Dudley, 
Clapp, Caldwell, Lew and Chas. E. 

Roberts. It has been decided to carry 
two relay teams, as in so doing better 

work may be done by the men of the 

first team and efficient substitutes de- 
termined. The prospects for a fast 

relay team are good and it is expected 

that the team when developed will be 

fully capable of equalling the record 

made by last year's team. Along 

other lines there has shown up several 

good distance men, two men of no 

mean ability in the high jump and some 

capable short dash men. It is hoped 

that some good material along this 

latter line may show up in the Inter- 
class meet. 

Regular practise for all candidates No ' 2 p,e «« nt . *- Amherst. Mass. 

is being held each day out on the 

track. For the regular men this prac- 
tise is supplemented by efficient 

rubbing, which with well observed 

training is bringing them down to fine 

condition. On Saturday morning last 

the men were given their time, which 

in most cases should be very encour- 
aging to them : it was at least to the 

management. The management feels 

confident that the team and men as 

entered in the four big meets scheduled 

will have the ability to and will do our 

Aggie great credit. We will go get 

W. P. I. at Boston Feb. 12th, and 

with that as a starter we should pass 

creditably through the remainder of 

the schedule. The schedule is as 

follows : 

Jan. 22 Interclass Meet. 
" 26 Amherst at M. A. C. Practice 

Run. 
" 29 Amherst at Amherst. Prac- 
tise Meet. 

Feb. 12 B, A. A. Meet. W. P. I, — 
M. A. C. 
" 21 Hartford Meet. 
»« 22 Troy Meet. Hamilton-Un- 
ion- M. A. C. 



*E. N. PARISEAU,^* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



LIVERY, BOARDING and 



FEED STABLES 



Before ordering your horses 
Proms and other occasions call 



for 



on 



F. H. WARREN 
& SON 

8 Center St., Northampton. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 18, 1910. 




THOMPSON 



Sporting Goods 

Store and 

Repair Shop. 



Don't strain your 
eyes by using a kero- 
sene lamp or an elec- 
tric lamp hung in the 
center of the room. 

Call and see our 
full line of Portable 
Electric Lamps at 
S2.50 up. 

3 handsome Read- 
ing Lamps at a very 
low price. 

Coat and vest pock- 
et lights. All prices. 

Batteries and El- 
ectrical Novelties. 






E. A. Thompson 



Rear of First Nat. Bank. 



Mar. 5 Pending. 
M 12 Columbia Meet. 
" 19 Pending. 

" 23 Union at Amherst. Dual 
Meet. 

We are as yet unmatched in the 
Hartford and Columbia meets. In the 
latter it is expected that we may be 
matched with either Penn. State or 
Columbia. Much benefit is expected 
to be derived from the practise runs 
with Amherst, and practise being pre- 
paratory to the B. A. A. meet. We 
eagerly await the Dual meet wfth 
Union feeling that the trophy plaque to 
be contested for will fittingly ornament 
our trophy room. 

In closing this article the track 
management wishes to give a word of 
encouragement to the men practising 
daily : try your hardest, any effort on 
your part will be appreciated and your 
progress carefully noted. If you are 
running, run hard; if you are jumping, 
jump high and whatever you do, get 
into it. Good opportunities are offered 
you in the schedule, qualify for them. 
R. S. Eddy, Mgr. 

CLUB NEWS 

STOCKBRIDCE CLUB. 

Last Tuesday evening Prof. S. B. 
Haskell addressed a large gathering of 
the Stockbridge Club on "The Pres- 
ent Prices of Fertilizers." At the 
regular meeting it was decided to ten- 
der membership to the Short Course 
students, and all new men that wish to 
join will be welcome. 

THE DKAMATIC SOCIETY. 

The growing interest in dramatics 
was shown by the large gathering thai 
turned out last Monday evening for the 
purpose of founding a Dramatic 
Society. The following officers were 
elected : President, A. H. Sharpe and 
secretary, J. E. Dudley. A commit- 
tee consisting of W. J. Birdsall, E. B. 
Young and G. Zabriskie was appointed 
to draw up a constitution and by-lavs. 
The time has undoubtedly come for 
the founding of such a society, and 
with the help of the whole student body 
it will be made a success. 

DEBATING CLUB. 

At the regular meeting of the Debat- 
ing Club, Wednesday evening the fol- 
lowing officers were elected for the 
second third of the year: President, 
B. Ostrolenk ; vice-president, A. C. 
Brett; secretary, B. G, Southwick ; 
treasurer, M. C. Pratt ; credit secre- 
tary, L. Terry ; program committee, 
R. A. Waldron, H. J. Baker and D. 
Baker. 

A debate with Bates college is being 
considered. If such a debate is car- 
ried out, every man in college with 
any ability should attend the Debating 
Club meetings and help the club make 
a showing worthy of M. A. C. 

A very interesting debate was held 
on the question: Resolved, that Home 
Rule should be granted to Ireland. 
The affirmative was successfully 
upheld by R. A. Waldron and M. C. 
Pratt. F. T. Haynes and L. W. Burby 
were their opponents. 



T. J^. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSI 



AMHERST, MASS. 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 



HIOII CLASS 



I ...TAILOR... 

Foreign and domestic woolens always on hand. These 
goods arc of the most exclusive patterns, and my work is 
guaranteed to be tailored in the latest style and workmanship. 

Cleanings Altering, Repmiring mud Pressing 

A Specialty. 
Full Press Suits to Rent. The only place in town. 

A nice line of MEN'S FURNISHINGS. The famous 
Eagle Shirt, the K. & \V. (Redman's Brand) Collars and 
Dress Shirts. Special Dancing Gloves and Dress Ties. 
Nice new line of Necktie Pins, Cuff Buttons and Studs. Bos- 
ton Garters, Suspenders, &c 



LABROV/TZ 



1 1 Amity St. 



Phone 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS PINS 



Dance Programs 






— % .A *Jt 1^0 








Fraternity 


and 














and 


Invitations 
















Class Inserts 


Menus 




















for Annuals 


Leather Dance 
Cases and 






fit 


l| 


\? 








Fraternity 
and (lass 


Covers 


Wedd 


"g 


Invil 








Callin 


| 


Cards 


Stationery 




ations 


and 





WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 18, 1910. 



Methods in 



GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

^ English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 

■.•.•.•.•,•.■.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.'.■.•.•.•.•.•••.•.••■••••••.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••■••••.■.•••.•••.■••• 




STORIES BY PROFESSOR NEAL -Intensive hardening 

The New York Morning Telegraph Massachusetts." 

for Dec. 26 contained an illustrated entomology. 

full-page story, "The World, the Devil, a. I. Bourne, a graduate student in 

and Nantucket," by Professor Neal. Entomology, has accepted a position 

It is a local- color story of Nantucket w j t h the United States Bureau of 

Island, introducing an outside element Entomology. His headquarters will be 

in the theatrical summer visitors to the a t Washington, 

island. D. J. Caffre> '09 has accepted a 

Ho/and's Magazine for January also poS j t i on on the Gipsy Moth Commis- 







contains work by Professor Neal, under 
the title "Little Pictures of New 
York." The '-little pictures" are five 
sketches of New York City life, rang- 
ing in setting from the interior of one 
of the best known restaurants to unset- 
tled woodlands within the city limits. 
The sketches are especially suggestive 
of street scenes and of the widely 
varied experiences of city existence. 
Ail but one of them involve the theme 
of child-life. 

In "The Keepers of Vigil: Mirth ' 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty <»f College Classes. 



10^ Main St. 



Northampton, Mass, 



sion under State Entomologist Dr. W. 
E. Briton of Connecticut. 

LIBRARY. 

William H. Bowker 71 has recently 
given to the library a very valuable 
book on "Plant Food, Its Sources, 
Conservation, and Application." 

The Library received Irom bindery 
bound volumes of McClure's Magazine 
and T/ie Independent, from 1900 to 
date. Charities and the Commons, vol- 
umes 17-22 inclusive, tne American 
and'-ThrKeepers"of Vigih' Sorrow," Magazine volumes 66 68. and 25 vol- 
two extreme asoects of city .if, are umes of the bulletins of the various 
thrown into contrast-a type of fast ! bureaus of Me United States Depart- 
ing and a type of poverty stricken life. ™ en < of Agnculture. 
In --The City's Shards," the pathetic landscape gardening. 

story of a Second Avenue new-boy j The Apaiachian Mountain Club has 
and his spiritual longings is given. ; loaned Prof. F. A. Waugh a large 
"Arcadia in The Bronx" catencs tne collection of Alnian and Caucasian 

views. This S.-iler group is on exhi- 
bition in the Landscape Gardening 
room at Wilaer Hall. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine h'cpairitig ,1 Specialty 
Custom Work 



M..B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's I'.loek, Amiikkst, M 

Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



spirit of rural merry-making by a party 
of dancing, fiddling Italian picnicers. 
The closing sketch, "Broadway : The 
Interlude of Children," describing the 
outdoor play of the children in Grace 
Church day nursery, deals again espec- 
ially with child-life among the poor. 
All the sketches are illustrated, and 
the article is accompanied by a double- 
page drawing, "Winter in New York," 
by H. Ditzler. 



Holland's Block. 



STEAM II ITING, 
GAS PI l I ING, TINNING 



Phoenix Row 



TeleptooM 59— a- 



POMOLOGY. 

A \« m a Poston capitalist : 

To the Department of Pomolocy. 
Massachusetts Agricultural 
College : — 
Dear Sirs : — I am delirious of pur- 
chasing near Bostm a farm on which 
ippl-s will be th- specialty. ... I 
reel that I can secure unbiased infor- 
mation only from the experts at the 

In 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



A >p.-ci.(lt\ of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, fcc. 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMIIKKST. MASS 



E.B. DICKINSON D. D S. 

DBiVFAi* rooms 

Williams Bl<x k. Amherst, Mass. 

Omci 1 1 1 > ! 
Dto isa a, xi. usotofl 1 *. xi. 



Ether and .Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



BEST FARM IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story boose, bath room, 

hot and cold water; best farm in this 
Section, running spring water: 40 acres 
tillage, 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber: plenty of fruit and many Other gOO< 
features. $6000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
iS months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 

The department is deep in plans for g, ate Agricultural College, 
a fruit storage house which it is hoped pre f acin g my questions I will say that 
to erect next summer, the legislature | at prese nt own 640 acres of irrigated 
being kind. Plans are being drawn , land in Colorado. My actual bitter 
by Madison Cooper, an eminent stor- ] ex p er j encs with irrigation laws, and 
age engineer. This is something the sp i enc jid exhibits at the recent 
whicn has become highly important a p ple show in Boston have finally con- 
through the development of the porno- vin>:e( j me to return to good old New 
logical courses. England where Nature, not corpora- 

Work is practically completed on an tion> contro | s the moisture, 
orchard nursery of Amherst and a ] would be glad at any time to out- 
quantity of very interesting data his \^ m my experience in irrigation to the 
been collected. This will be of con- sluc } en ts of the college, if by so doing 
siderable use to the department and j can save some gooc j f armer f r New 
perhaps can be made available to the £ n g| a nd. 
public to good advantage. 



BOTANICAL. 

Prof. S. M. Bain of the Tennessee 



FLORICULTURE. 

The lecture on retail trade which 



W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-1*. 



rrOI. O. 1VI. Dallll Ul IMC icinicwcc 

, _ was to have been given by Edward 

Agricultural College and Experiment 

MacMulktn, before the floncultural 

students, was postponed because of the 
inability of Mr. MacMulkin to be pres- 
ent last Monday. On Friday, Jan. 



Station visited the Botanical depart 
ment on Jan. 3d. 

MARKET GARDENING 

There has been recently purchased 



1 nere im ueen rcucimy yui^uo;>=u , 

2 1 st Fred J. Elder, heating expert from 
for the library of the department about ' ' 

„- 4 . /. , _ u .. „ the Lord & Burnham Company, Irving- 

$50 worth of books. These practically " 

, . , ., , , ton-on-Hudson, will speaK on green- 

complete the list of books available 
, , , . . . .... house heating. 

which have special reference to this 

„_. , „_-», The short course students visited 

line 01 Wji k, 

On Tnursday Jan. 13th, H. F. the commercial establisment of H. 

Tompson will deliver an address before w - Field - Northampton. Saturday, 

the State Horticultural Association of J an - 8lh and made a stud y of the crops 

Pennsylvania, using as his subject g rown and tne methods of culture. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January is, , 9 , . 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 

tural department. The new »i ecu- 
houses are now producing fust class 
material and we have 1 nl roses, 

carnations, violets and c hys.mtheiiuiins 

in their season. Telephone or leave 

your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE 300 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM. 



7/ only from I A. M !. / . /. 1/. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the AMH1 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt '10 for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



They also visited the Smith Agricul- 
tural School in Northampton. Last 
Saturday the observation trip was to ' 
the commercial establishment of 
Joseph Beach, South Hadley and to 
the conservatory range connected with 
Mt. Holyoke College. 

Professor White lectures today before 
the Worcester County Horticultural 
Society and will visit the Worcester 
conservatories where L. C. Midley 
makes a specially of carnations. 

One thousani Manetti rose stocks 
have just been 'ec-ivea by th- depart- 
ment and • vill be ustd bv 
students for ^ratting indoor varieties of 
roses. 

Jan. I E. A. White lee 

tured br Manchester Institute 

of Arts and s, at Manchester, 

N. H., on • 
Garden Sci m e, " 

The meet, 1 , 1 . Asso- 

ciation for i inci 

held in Bj nas 

vacation, were attended by a 1 . 
number of M . 'is Agn :ull 

college men. represen: n»j 
students. Probably th 
these men w tiding th 

of the American Association of I 
nomic Entomologi:' 
papers read at th rnj^s of 

of the latter v\ r by grad 1 
college. At the business meeting of 
the association. Dr. Hei aid. 

professor of entomology at the col 
was elected first vice-president of 
association for tne coming . I. J, 

Franklin, 1904. and H. M. 

1906, were elected a I 

J. N. Summers. 1907, F A. John! 

1908, R. D. W 

Parker, 1908. S. S. Crossman, 

A. I. Bourne, post-gradu;.t 

H. Merrill, post-gradu 

ted associate members. 

Eighteen members of th 
Entomological club held a 
informal meeting at tne Copely Sq 
hotel, Boston, Dec. 28. 
Hinds, E. P. Felt, '91. gave inte 
ing accounts of th 
Europe. most important 

transacted was the passing 
to discontinue the senior pr 
tomology, said 

treasurer during the year and methods 
for loaning determined upon 
meeting in December i 

This action was taken not bee a 
of any dissatisfaction with the atti 
of students in regard to the Sentot 
tomology prizes, but because it was 
thought that the money involved w 
be put to a more helpful service by 
new arrangement. The follow! 
present: E.P. Felt, '91. R. A. 
'95, A. F. ; I. L. Fi 

W. E. Hinds, • H. Sm I 

R. D. Gilbert. 1900, E. E. Got 
1901, R. L. Smith, 1901, 
Hodgkins. 1902, A. V. Osmun, 1903, 
ams, 19C5. 

1907, J. N. Summers. 19 '. S. 
Regan, 1908. J. R. Parker. 1908 
W. Hooker, 1909. and J. H. Merrill. 
pent-graduate. 




THE N. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters an J Entomologists 

STAMFORD, C()N.\. 

THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 

SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



At the Greal Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
( )( tobcr 18 24, 1909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos 
phate Powder, (Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Kour 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medial, This fruit was raised l>\ Mr. 
Georc.i \ I in w ol < 'onnei ''■ '"• M. A. C, < lass 
of 1 1 ( < )ur pamphlel "Up To I ►ate I- ruil < imu 



in« 



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And — Fat i ma Cigarettes. 

A blend ol fine • ish 
tobao I mi Id 

and mellow. 

Made of perfectly mt cd 

tobacco, and there .sen I 

quisite smokes in i package. 

THE AMBRIC \\ TOH \< I 













8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 18, 1910. 



ALUMNI NEWS 

'94.— Bulletin 203 of the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station at Berkely, 
Cal. by R. E. Smith reports the re- 
sults of the past three years' work of 
the station plant pathologists, 

'04.— S. B. Haskell has been elec- 
ted lecturer of the Amherst Grange. 

•04.— S. R. Parker has been elec- ; 
ted lecture of the Hardwick Grange. 

•04.— Married at Springfield in De- 
cember, H. M. White to Miss Mary 
L. Farrar. Mr. and Mrs. White are 
in Florida where Mr. White is engaged 
in government experimental work and 
will remain about a month longer. 

'04. — J. W. Gregg, who has been 
professor of Horticulture at the Baron 
de Hirsch Agricultural School, Wood- 
bine, N. J., for a number of years, 
will remove to the State College, 
Penn. on Feb, 1 , where he will take 
up his duties as Assistant Horticuturist. 

'05. — Married Dec. 29, at New 
Haven, Conn., J. F. Lyman to Misb 
Nella Bull. 

'05. — A. D. Taylor will lecture be- 
fore the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society Jan. 29th, on "Study of Con- 
tinental Landscape Cardening. The 
lecture will be illustrated with views 
taken by Mr. Taylor while abroad. 

'07.— W. E. Dickinson is in Hawaii 

for the Sacremento Valley Sugar Co. 

'08.— T. F. Waugh, 27 Elm St., 

Teacher in Rockland 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College A11 Bim 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION MUCH 

Helow is a list of courses offered by the College for the first tune ... 
I9 o 9 - , 9 .o. Several other courses have been greatly amphhed and extended. 
In the Department of Agricultural Education: 



S.-miiKii in Education. 

In the Division of Agriculture: 

M.ikir.({, Manufactured Milk Products. 

In the Department of Chemistry: 

Advanced Analysis. Chemistry of *«»• Maktag and Mat*. 

In the Division of Horticulture: 
In the Division of Humanities: 

Department of I. UfMgtl md literature- double course), Periodical Writ- 

. r.iin,n« Curse [double course. A^^Uffi 1 ReTd K» WlSSSKa Literature, Pttfi 

lag, Frosen.inar in journal. ,... ^^^^^S^uSSim *•>**>« Eighteenth Century 

tan and Restoration Literature, Earij fc «ntei ntn . l *;V. ■'.... ,,„r„ r-i 

1 



Department of Political Science— 

, ,:, n „ mi c History, 1 be H.story of New Ln K land. I be ll.stnn o "«*'•■ 

In the Department of Mathematics. Physics, and Civil Engineering. 

Analytic Mechanics, Descriptive (leonietr | 

In the Department of Physical Education and Hygiene: 

Advanced Gyniiiastus 

In the Department of Rural Social Science: 

Kle-nents of Agricultural to* ^^^^^ ^"^ ^^ ^ 

SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William 



Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



Rockland, Me. 
High School. 

•08.— T. L 
land on Dec. 



Warner left Sunder- 
13th for Washington, 
D. C. His work this winter will be in 
the waters of the southern coasts. 

'09.— L. S. Corbett, in charge of 
civil engineering work for the United 
Fruit Co., on Sixaola Survey, Guabito, 
Boeas del Toro, Panama. He has 98 
men under him. 

'09.— House and Garden for De- 
cember had an illustrated article on 
"All the Firs and Spruces" by John 
Noyes. 

'09.— -A. W. Hubbard, Sunderland, 
general agent for Bowker Fertilizer 
Co. of Boston in Hampshire and 
Franklin counties. 

'09.- D. F. Ingals, Stoneham 
Hotel, Stoneham, engaged in con- 
struction work. 

'09. Married at North Uxbridge, 
Jan. 1st. C. H. White and Miss Grace 
Bradford Cnurch. 

'09. -The call for the class letter 
has been issued by secretary Putnam. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

N neteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Debating Club, 



E. Leonard, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

H. W. French, President 

H.J. Baker, President 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a fust class order. 

Electrical Massage 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dykino, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Hear Henry 1- "isl.\s 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Robert. 

CARS 

Leave AGGIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rate» 

AMHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



I to you want Se< uritj for Borrow 
Money to continue your College 



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( )f highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



<i talk it over. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

litiii- Q, Davis, Agent, 1 1 North 



J 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



- Vol. XX. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 25, 1910. 



No. 15 



THE MacMILLAN PRIZE 



A New Prize for Juniors in Agriculture. 
A Set of the Cyclopedia of Agri- 
culture for Best Thesis. 

The Macmillan Co. of New York 
has very generously offered to the col- 
lege, as a prize to be competed for by 
the members of the Junior class, a 
complete four volume set of the Amer- 
ican Cyclopedia of Agriculture, edited 
by Prof. L. H. Bailey. This set is a 
valuable addition to the library of any- 
one interested in country life, and is 
of especial value to those employed in 
technical agriculture. The price of 
the complete set Is twenty dollars. 
The Cyclopedia is offered to Juniors 
in order that the successful competi- 
tor may have the use of the books 
during his senior year when such a 
reference work would naturally be of 
the most value. 

The prize is to be awarded, under 
the supervision of the Division of Agri- 
culture of M. A. C, for the best th-sis 
upon any subject directly connected 
with general agriculture. The subject 
is to be approved by and registered 
with the Division before Feb. 15, and 
the completed thesis is to be passed 
In before June 1. In order that no 
members of the c!ass need be excluded 
the Macmillan Co. has specifically 
stated that if the prize is won by a 
student who already already owns a 
set of the Cyclopedia, having pur- 
chased it from them or their agents,* 
they will pay the winner of the prize 
the value of the set in gold. 

It is hoped that a large number of 
the class will enter this competition as 
the prize may be continued if the inter- 
est shown justifies it. To Juniors 
"get into the game" both on your 
own account, and that of succeeding 
classes. 



BRILLIANT RECITAL 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Jan. 25 — 7 00 p. m. Senior Class Re- 
hearsal in Chapel. 

Jan. 26. — 1-15 p. M. Assembly in 
Chapel : Dr. W. I. Cham- 
berlain of Hudson, Ohio. 
3-00 p. m. Practice Run. Am- 
herst vs. M. A. C. 
7-00 p. m. Senior Class Re- 
hearsal in Chapel. 
Debating Club in Agricultural 
Lecture Room. 

Jan. 27.— 6 45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. 
in Chapel. Mr. C. R. Green, 
Leader. 

Jan. 28. — 3-00 p. M. Hockey on Pond 
Univ. of Penn., vs. M. A. C. 
7- 00 p. m. Senior Class Re- 
hearsal. 

Jan. 29. — Practice Meet. M. A. C. 
vs. Amherst at Amherst Col- 
lege Gymnasium. 
6-30 p. m. Illustrated lecture 
on "The Yellowstone Park" 
by Prof. W. P. Brooks, in the 
Chapel. 



1913 WINS MEET 



Students Enjoy 'Cello Recital Given by 

Frederic Blair of Boston. Different 

Periods of Music Portrayed. 

The first of a promising series of 
concerts was given at 4-30 Wednes- 
day afternoon in the College chapel to 
a large and well pleased audience con- 
sisting of faculty, students and towns- 
people. The performers were Frederic 
Blair, Violincellist, and F. Albert 
Baumgartner, Pianolst, both of Bos- 
ton. Mr. Blair who is a pupil of Julius 
Klengel of Leipslc, played a represen- 
tation of 'cello music, arranged in 
three groups to illustrate the classic, 
the romantic and the modern way of 
writing for the 'cello. Attractive ex- 
amples of each style were offered, from 
the prelude and courante by Bach to a 
Romance by MacDowell and "The 
Swan" by Saint-Saens. Mr. Blair is 
a musical and well schooled player, 
who does not exploit technic unduly, 
and prefers to keep to the proper sphere 
of his instrument, though in the "Spin- 
ning Song" he showed a nimble left 
hand. 

Mr. Baumgartner played two groups 
of Solos, tne Verdi Liszt "Riga- 
letto" Paraphrase and Chopin's 
"Polonaise Militaire" being specially 
attractive numbers which stirred the 
audience to enthusiasm. The full 
program : — 

Violoncello. (Classic). 

a. Prelude and Courante 

from Suite in G Major, 

John Sebastian Mach 

b. Largo from Sonata in I), 

Francisco Maria Veracini 

c. Allegro from Sonata in K, 

(iuiseppe Valentin! 

Piano. 

a. Rigoletto Paraphrase Verdi-Liszt 

b. Polonaise-Militaire, Frederic Chopin 

Violoncello. (Romantic.) 

a. Traumerei (Dream*), 

Robert Schumann 

b. To the (iuitarre, Moritz Moszkowski 

c. Chanson Arabe, I From Oriental 

d. Oanse Oriental, J Suite, 

Rene de Boisdeffre 

Piano. 

a. Liebestraum (Love Dream), No. 3, 

Franz Liszt 

b. Gavotte Caprice, 

Theodor H. H. Verhey 

c. Allegro from Faschingschwank 

Robert Schumann 

Violoncello (Modern.) 

a. Romance, Edward W. Macdowell 

b. Le Cygne (The Swan), 

Camille Saint-Sains 

c. Spinning Song, David Popper 



, 



C. M. Damon '11 is obliged to be 
at his home in Haydenvilie on account 
of his father's illness. He will proba- 
bly be away from college about two 
months. 



Freshmen Win with Seniors Close Sec- 
ond. Good Material Brought 
to Light. 

The annual indoor interclass meet 
was held Saturday afternoon in the 
Drill Hall and resulted as follows : 
1913— 26 points; 1910 22; 1912 
20 and 1911 — 13. The weather was 
bad for the first outdoor-track runs, a 
heavy rain bothering the runners and 
making the turns slippery. 

In the 1000yd. run the entries were 
Paulsen '10, Bodfish '12. Prouty and 
D. F. Baker '13. Paulsen led for 
about half-way only to give place to 
Bodfish, who was beaten out by a nose 
in a pretty finish-sprint by Baker. 
Time, 2 mln. 39 2-5 sec. 

Cowles '10, Barrows ' 1 1 , Birdsall 
'12 and Ames '13, lined up for the 
600 yd. run. Barrows beat out 
Cowles by Inches, while Ames made a 
good third. Time, 1.27 4-5. 

For the mile run the following men 
were entered : Holland and Folsom 
'10, Dee and Hutchings '12, Caldwell 
and Rose "3. Holland led for half 
the distance when the lead was taken 
by Dee Caidwell and Dee sprinted 
the last three laps, Caldwell winning 
handily. Rose was third. Time, 
5.00 2 5. 

There were fifteen entries for the 
indoor 25-yd. dash. In the trial heats 
tne winners were S. C. Brooks, Cleve- 
land and Dickinson. In tne semi- 
finals Nielsen won from the field that 
finished second in the trials. He also 
carried off the honors in the final, 
winning by a scant foot. Brooks and 
Dickinson finished second and third. 
Time, 3 3-5 sec. 

In the running high jump the entries 
were as follows : Thomas and Sche- 
merhorn '10, Stack and Walker '12, 
Huntington and Pillsbury '13. Scher- 
horn went out at 4 ft, 10 in., Stack at 

4 ft. II in., Pillsbury at 5 ft., while 
Huntington won easily with the bar at 

5 ft. 3 in. 

The 16 lb. shot put entries were: 
Schermerhorn and Hayward '10, 
Eisenhaure, Walker and Parker '12, 
Ames, Samson and Hayden' 13. Sam- 
son's best heave was 37 ft. 7 1-5 In., 
a new record for the college. Walker 
was second with a put of 35 ft. 7 1-5 
in., and Ames third with 34 ft. 9 3-5 
inches. 

Nickless and Cloues '10, Racicot 
and C. A. Smith 'II, Walker 12, and 
Whitney and Drury '13 were the en- 
tries for the rope climb. Cloues and 



LARGE BUDGET ASKED 



Appropriations for Athletic Field and 
New Dairy Building Princi- 
pal Items. 



/", 



The Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege his introduced into the Legislature 
biils for special appropriations and for 
increnses in the present annual income, 
the sum of which aggregates $387,- 
000. 

I One of these bills asks for an appro- 
priation of $25,000 for land to be used 
in part for an athletic field and recrea- 
lon ground, and in part for the work 
f the horticultural department and 
tlier college purooses, Additional 
land Is needed if the project for an en- 
closed athletic field and recreation 
ground, which was started a year ago 
and for which the Legislature of 1909 
granted $5,500.. is to be carried out. 
The division of horticulture needs 
more land to properly carry on Its prac- 
tical work of an educational character. 
Otner land is also needed for school 
gardens and the Experiment Station. 

Other requests for special appropria- 
tions are: For equipment for the new 
building for entomology and zoology, 
$15,000; rtpairsand improvements to 
college buildings and other property, 
$35,000; teaching and office equip- 
ment for the various departments, 
$15,000 ; dairy building and complete 
equipment, $75,000; enlargement of 
the chemical laboratory of the Experi- 
ment Station, $28,000 ; laboratory for 
Instruction in practical pomology and 
market gardening, $ 1 6,000 ; buildings 
for instruction in poultry husbandry, 
$5,000 ; laboratory for Instruction in 
animal husbandry, $10,000; enlarge 
ment of the dining hall to provide 
room for the increasing attendance of 
students, $23,000. 

An increase of a total of $1 10,000. 
in the current annual income, is asked 
for. This amount includes items for 
the following purposes : General main- 
tenance of the institution, (heat, light, 
water., etc.) $35,000; to provide ad- 
ditional instructors in departments of 
college work already established, and 
to make possible the taking up of n»w 
lints of instruction, $20,000; for ad- 
ditional support of the normal depart- 
ment, $5,000 ; for the further develop- 
ment of the department of short 
courses, including the employment of 
field agents, practical demonstrators, 
and free lecturers, making agricultural 
surveys, educational exhibits at fairs, 
etc., $17,500; for more adequate 
maintenance of the graduate school 



Walker were tied for first place, each \ which is constantly increasing in at- 
taching the bell in 6 seconds. In the' tendance, $2,500; for the care and 



final Walker won in 5 4-5 aec. Nick- 
less was third with a 7 second climb. 

[Continued on page 4 ] 



development of the college grounds 
not used for instruction purposes, $5,- 

Contlnued on page 8.] 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 25, 1910. 



THE COLLEGEjIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910. Editor-in-Chief. 

ARTHUR H. SHARPE, 1911, 

HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910, 

LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910. 

EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911. 



Asm. Editor. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, College Notes 

SIQMAL OFFIC1 H0U*S. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. m. 

Tuesday. Thursday and Fridays from 0-30 
to 7-30 P. M. 
Manager— Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 p. M. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 P. M- 

Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 M. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager 
PARK W. ALLEN. 1911. Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, JAN. 25. No. 15 



How about the Junior Prom. 
Feb. 25th. Invitations may be 
procured from A. P. Bursley, 'n, 
16 North College. 



The Board regrets very much the 
resignation of Mr. Sharpe as one of its 
members. His work has been faith- 
fully and well done and we wish him to 
know that we appreciate it. 



The Signal has been intending to 
start the petition for a sub-post office 
here at the college but the matter has 
not been pushed at all by the students 
and so It has not received as prompt 
attention as it deserves. For the time 
being, how would the hiring of a lock 
box work? The college carrier could 
get the student mail when the presi- 
dent's mail was brought up. Some- 
thing ought to be done for we should 
get our mail as soon as chapel is over. 



The musical Recital given last 
Wednesday was one of the rare treats 
of the year. We deplore the fact that 
more students could not have been 
there. The officers of the college and 
a goodly number from the upper classes 
were present but the lower classes 
surely were somewhat conspicuous by 
their absence. All of us must remem- 
ber that college is not entirely a busi- 
ness proposition ; it is to develop all 
sides of us. One cannot afford to let 
occasions like last Wednesday pass. 



VESPER SERVICE 

Rev. Herbert J. White ex- '87 was 
the speaker at the service last Sunday 
afternoon. His Scripture reading was 
taken from the seventh chapter of 
Hebrews and his message was based 
on the life of Melchizedec. "Now 
consider how great this man was, unto 
whom even Abraham gave a tenth of 
the spoils." "Great men are always 



an attractive study, and it matters not 
in what age a man lives if his life is an 
example of great courage and superb 

manhood." 

"Only once does this man appear 
on the stage of life, but in that brief 
moment he reveals himself to be 
second to Christ in priestly position. 
The facts concerning this man in the 
Old Testament are very brief. In 
Hebrews our information is found in 
the account concerning Abraham. 
The patriarch had proved himself 
one of the greatest men in Jewish 
history. When Lot was captured by 
warlike tribes and his property had 
been looted, Abraham gathered an army, 
overtook the enemy, surprised them 
with a night attack, retakes the spoil, 
and returned with Lot. This is an illus- 
tration of native greatness in the man 
in attempting that which presented 
itself to be done. On the return 
journey Abraham mets Melchizedec, 
and kneeling before him, presented him 
with a tenth of the spoils. The bear- 
ing of this priestly king and kingly 
priest had caused the warrior hero to 
bow before him, and receive a bless- 
ing. This is the Old Testament 
account. 

The book of Hebrews is written cen- 
turies later recording this man's deed 
and paying tribute to his character. 
Nothing is known of Melchizedek's 
genealogy, of his birth or death ; nor 
was he created a priest after the form 
of the Jewish church,— "Not after the 
power of carnal command, but by the 
power of an endless life. We know 
that he became the king of Salem, but 
he was not of royal lineage, else would 
the writer of Hebrews have traced It 
for us. He was a king, not by birth, 
but by worth. "Royalty is a matter 
of character; the crown of glory is in 
the look of the eye, and morality in the 
lines of the face." Melchizedec 
came to royal place through royal 
character. That is why this figure 
stands out with such great distinctness 
against the glorious sky of the past. 
For God were we made and our lives 
are in incomplete unless God molds us. 
"I know the feelings which students 
cherish, reaching out with eager 
ambition for life's prizes, its great 
tasks, its noble living. 1 want every 
man here to be a king. Royal man- 
hood is possible for every one of you. 
I want you to be more than a king, a 
priest. Many of you will attain wealth, 
but wealth will not fill the highest 
places in your life, will not make it 
complete j only God can fill it com- 
pletely. Having come to the estate 
of kingly manhood, be a priest to all, 
so that the children whom you know 
may respond, and the men and women 
co-operate in loyal living." 




With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 



TIES 



JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 



Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 



$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 

J A M ESTfT P AG E 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <& SHOE 
REPAIRING 

|at 
LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

R. LEVINE 

1 1 is Amity St. Amherst. 



DEUEL'S 
DRUG 



THURBER'S 

NKXT-ToPOSTOmCE 

Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants/.etc. 



Gillette Safety Razors 

Gillette Blades 

Gem Junior Safety Razors, $1.00 

Ever Ready Safety Razors 

Blades 

Colgate's Rapid Shave Powder 

Colgate's Talcum Powder 
Tooth Powders and Tooth Pastes 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP A GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



DEMONSTRATION OF MILKING 
MACHINE 

Last week Thursday a representative 
of the B. L. K. Milking Machine Co. 
was explained and demonstrated his 
company's product at the college 
barns. 



Deuel's Drue Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 25, 1910. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

O O A L 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



Folsom 'io 



Nickless 'io 



Aggie 



Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers '12 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

"DON'T KICK'' if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Dropper. 
Get the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill it." 

Guaranteed to give satisfac- 



tion. 



SOLD BY 



E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



CONDITIONS AT THE DINING 
HALL 

The Editor of The College Sicnal 
has asked me to write an article on 
the conditions at the Dining Hall. 
The following is a summary of condi- 
tions as they appear to me after two 
weeks' investigation. We are at the 
present running an experiment, the 
result of which will not be known until 
we figure up at the end of the 15 days, 
to find how much it costs to board the 
men with their co-operation. 

At the beginning of our work we 
assumed that unnecessary expense 
could be caused in three ways : — first 
by poor buying, second by poor hand- 
ling at the Dining Hall and third by 
unnecessary waste by the students 
themselves. 

First of all we looked up the buying 
department and found that the prices 
paid for food were as a whole the low- 
est obtainable. The only trouble 
seems to be in the distances these 
goods were shipped. By buying in 
Springfield for approximately the same 
prices we could save all freight 
charges as the merchants there will 
prepay goods. Under the present sys- 
tem we pay half the charges. 

On the other hand the buying depart- 
ment Is woefully weak. During this 
entire fall no accurate checking sys- 
tem has been carried out. A barrel 
of meat comes and the dealer's weight 
is accepted as correct. A carload of 
potatoes were purchased and no man 
can even tell how many loads were 
drawn. In short no one has taken the 
trouble to check up the goods pur- 
chased. We pay a man for this, why 
hasn't he done it ? During this week 
the committee has found two cases of 
short weight which would have passed 
unnoticed under the old system. 

As far as we have been able to 
determine everything has been care- 
fully handled after it enters the Dining 
Hall and no waste can possibly be 
charged against the help there. 

On the student side we found great 
room for improvement. It had been 
the custom to carry in vegetables, 
soups and desserts for every man 
regardless of whether he wanted them 
or not. This week we have tried the 
system of calling every order to make 
sure that men desired desserts, vege- 
tables and so forth before bringing 
them out. This has proved a great 
saving, there being only one-half as 
many vegetables used and one-third 
less desserts. 

This shows that the fault must be 
divided between the buyer and the 
students. Both have been slack and 
we must get together and find a cure. 

First of all the buyer must be a big 
man. The Dining Hall handles nearly 
$50,000 every year. To carry on 
such a business requires a tactful, 
careful bsuiness man. He should 
check up and inspect every article 
which he purchases and then there 
would not be six hundred pounds of 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

"^the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



$1000 IN GASH PRIZES FOR CORN 

$500 for Quantity— $500 for Quality. 

It is known that a ton of English hay grown on rich land has a higher 
feeding value, pound for pound, than a ton of swale hay grown on poor 
land. The same is no doubt true of corn. To prove it in time for the results 
to be known at the great New England Corn Exposition, to be held next 
fall, and to prove whether Dent corn is more profitable to grow than Flint corn 

WE OFFER $1000 IN CASH to be awarded $500 in prizes' 
for the largest quantity of water-free shelled corn obtained 
from an acre, grown on Stockbridge Corn Manure exclusively and 

ONR (IRANI) SWEEPSTAKE PRIZE OF $500 
to be awarded for the crop of moisture-free shelled corn obtained from one 
acre on Stockbridge exclusively, which shows the greatest FOOD VALUE 
determined not only by quantity, but also by quality, the qualtity being 
determined by analysis and based on the amount of protein, carbo-hydrates, 
fat and mineral matter in the water-free grain, their relative feeding values to 
be judged by a scale to be established by experiment station experts and others. 
Iff This contest is open to New England farmers only, and exclusive of 
the prize winners in our 1909 contest. Not less than 1000 lbs. of Stockbridge 
Manure for corn shall be used per acre, and no other dressing. 

POTATO CONTEST. We offer for 1910 $200 in prizes for potatoes 
grown on Stockbridge Potato Manure exclusively and sprayed with Bowker's 
Pyrox. Open to all New England farmers except Aroostook and Penobscot 
Counties in Maine and last year's prize winners. 

I'«>r Ptirtlior I'nrtlouliirH \Vrltt> to 

FERTILIZER CO., 

43 CHATHAH ST., BOSTON 

Send for Mr. Bowker's new'took "Plant Food, Its Sources and Application," mailed free. 
Not a line of advertising in the text. 



BOWKER 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum, ar\d High Streets, 



Hartford, Cot[t\. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Hushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Bottom. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Walter S. Garde. 



^arp^rvter fit Morehouse, 



PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 25, 1910- 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 9$, 1910. 






WHAT ABOUT 



THAT FALL SUIT 



If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 
Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - • 

Rain Cloth, - $3.50 per yd. 1 rousenngs, - *3-5° 

I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



of fine 

$12.50 

$11.50 

$10.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

$9.00 

per yard. 



A. P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 



N 



Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



STUDENT 

ALL THE MAGAZINES FURNITURE, 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



rancid butter for the students to eat or 
any short weights on meat. 

We are told that the Dining Hall 
buys of only honest concerns and so 
there is no need of weighing up the 
food.— Good business principles, eh? 

On the other hand as much or more | 
depends upon the students. Every 
man whether he be a waiter or not, 
must realize his personal responsibility. 
The price of board means more to this 
college than anything else. On tha 
price of board depends the success or 
failure of this institution. We have 
long been famed as a poor man's col- 
lege. Let us keep that reputation and 
let "Old Mass'chusetts" stand for a 
place where a poor boy can get a good 
education at a small cost. 

The state has done everything pos- 
sible for us. It furnishes light, heat 
and a modern building absolutely free 
beside cartage for all our material 
from the depot. What more can we 

ask? 

Fellows it is ■ * up to you. " If every 
man will co-operate with Mr. Kenney 
we can keep the price of board down. 
Remember that every man that eats 
at the Dining Hall must do his part, 
the buyer and steward can't make a 
success of the plan without your help. 
In order to cut down expenses in 
every possible way there should be a 
permanent Dining Hall Committee 
composed of two members of the fac- 
ulty, one senior and one junior. Such 
a committee could receive complaints 
and suggestions and work together to 
give us better food at less cost and in 
this way pave the way for bigger and 

better M. A. C. 

M. S. Hazen. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry beciu-e they 
know that their shoes are 

right. 
Prices $350, $400, $500. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



jnE. N. PARISEAU..C 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



1913 WINS MEET 

[Continued from first paga.] 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M.D. OILMAN. CA. MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



35 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3Ct. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 ■ Broken Hank and Confederate 

Bills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars an.l 

Selling price list. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



In the relay race (three laps to a 
man) the teams were : 1910— S. C. 
Brooks, Damon, Dickinson and 
Cloues; 191 1— Nielson, McLaughlin, 
Barrows and Dudley: 1912— Terry 
Williams, Reed and Clapp ; 1913— 
Larsen. Goodnough, Clark and Whit 
ney. The men of each team ran in 
the order named. 1910 won handily, 
never being headed. 1912 ran a 
strong race and took second place. In 
spite of Dudley's fine attempt to over- 
come a bad lead 1911 finished third. 
The winner's time was 3.20 1-5. 

The Sophomore pursuit race team 
consisting of Dee, Ells. Clapp, Maxon 
and Birdsell ran well and defeated the 
Freshman team made up of Whitney, 
Tucker, Barber, Lexex and A. J. 
Kelley, by a small margin. 
The score follows: 
1910 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherat House will receive 
prompt attention. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST, Boston. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



1 

3 



1000 yd. 
600 yd. 
1 mile 

25-yd. dash 4 

Running High Jump — 
Shot Put — 

Rope Climb 4 

Relay Race 10 



1911 

5 

5 



1912 1913 

5 

1 



WARREN AUTO CO., 

15 Maple Street, 
Northampton, - Mass. 



3 
3 



1 
3 
5 
5 



Totals 



22 



13 



20 26 



'04. F. D. Couden has opened a 

law office in Seattle, Wash. 



Autos for Hire and Ex- 
change. 

We have the agency for the 
Ford Cars you hear praised 
so highly. Five passenger 
Touring Car, all complete, 
$950. 




THpPSOM 



Sporting Goods 

Store and 

Repair Shop. 



Don't strain your 
eyes by using a kero- 
sene lamp or an elec- 
tric lamp hung in the 
center of the room. 

Call and see our 
full line of Portable 
Electric Lamps at 
#2.50 up. 

3 handsome Read- 
ing Lamps at a very 
low price. 

Coat and vest pock- 
et lights. All prices. 

Batteries and El- 
ectrical Novelties. 



»IAK£ C 



E. A. Thompson 



Rear of First Nat. Bank. 



UNION ENTERTAINMENT 

The students and friends of the col- 
lege were given another rare treat last 
Saturday evening in the excellent 
musical and literary program presented 
by the Arthur Beard Concert Company 
under the auspices of the Social Union, 
The company presented several very I 
excellent artists, the foremost of which 
were Mr. Beard, vioiinist and Miss 
Jane Lewis, reader. The latter's 
selections were pleasing to the utmost 
and she was called upon to give many 
encores. The program presented 
was : — 

PART 1. 
Piano Solo, Rondo Capricioso Mendelssohn 

Mrs. S. Glover Winter. 

Violin Solo, Concerto De Berlot 

(Andante-Allegro) 

Mr. Arthur L. Beard 

Reading. "The Little Minister" 

Miss Jane Lewis. 
Soprano Solo, 

a. Thy Beaming Eyes 

b. Irish Love Song 

c. Aria (Cavalleria Rusticana) 

Mascagni 
Miss Adela Metzner. 

part n. 
Piano Solo. 

a. Prelude 

b. Waltz 

Mr. Winter. 
Reading, Sally Ann at a Prayer Meeting 

Eliza Calvert Hall 

Miss Lewis 
Violin Solo, 

a. Meditation 

b. By the Brook 

c. Mazurka 

Mr. Beard. 
Soprano Solo. For All Eternity 
with violin abligato 
Miss Metzner and Mr. Beard. 



T. Iv. PAIGE 




Barrie 



McDowell 
Lang 



Chopin 
Coderd 



Massenet 
•Boisde'fre 
Wieniawski 

Mascheroni 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 
Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



S. T. S. GYM TEAM EXHIBITION 

Last Friday evening, the gym team 
from Springfield Training School gave 
an exhibition in the Drill Hall before 
almost the entire student body and a 
large number of visitors from town. 
The team was given long and enthusi- 
astic applause after each of their drills, 
dances and feats on the bars and on 
the mat. The men were faultlessly 
trained and went through each exer- 
cise with hardly a mistake. 

The program was opened with a Free 
Hand Drill, which, though not difficult, 
was done with a snap and vigor which 
was pleasant to watch. Following 
this came work on the parallel bars, 
which was one of the best events on 
the program. The Wand Drill was 
especially fine from the onlookers' 
standpoint, the metal wands producing 
a fine effect in the glare of the light. 
The Club Swinging drill and the Ciub 
Swinging solo by J. E. Simmons 
gained well-deserved applause. A 
unique feature was a Kasatschok 
Dance by G. W. Gaskey, who 
appeared dressed in Russian costume 
and went through the contortions of a j 
Russian dance. Other items on the 
program which are deserving of merit 
are the Horizontal Bar work, the 
Oxen Dance, the Jump Jack Dance, 
Pyramid work and the tumbling feats. 

At the close of the exhibition the i 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 



HIGH CLASS 



. . . TAILOR . . . 

Foreign and domestic woolens always on hand. These 
goods are of the most exclusive patterns, and my work is 
guaranteed to be tailored in the latest style and workmanship. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing and Pressing 

A Specialty. 

Full Dress Suits to Rent. The only place in town. 

A nice line of MEN'S FURNISHINGS. The famous 
Eagle Shirt, the E. & W. (Redman's Brand) Collars and 
Dress Shirts. Special Dancing Gloves and Dress Ties. 
Nice new line of Necktie Fins, Cuff Buttons and Studs. Bos- 
ton Garters, Suspenders, &c. 



LABROV/TZ 



1 1 Amity St. 



Phone 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 25, toio. 



•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••• .•.•.•.•.•.••• •.•.•.•.•.•.•••••••••• 






Springfield team gave their yell which 
was heartily returned with a Long 
Yell for Springfeld by the student 
body. 




GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

. >l English and Scotch Woolens. 

— ^^\J THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



CLUB NEWS 

STOCKBRIDCE CLUB. 



if 



.^V.^^^^^^^^^•••••••■•^ S W«A^^••••••• 



.•, A A A A A A A, A • « 




HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Hlock, Amhkhst, Mass, 
Cut flowers always on hand 

Telephone or call. 



Holland's Block, 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM FITTIHG, Telephone $9—4 

GAS PITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 
Uto is* A.. M. l.tsotos I». Ma 



Ether and Nitrous 
stered when desired 



Oxide Gas admin 



Addressed by George A. Drew and 
P. R. Ziegler on "Orchard Renova- 
tion'' and "Milking Machines." 

George A. Drew, M. A. C, '97 
was the first speaker before the Stock- 
bridge club last Monday evening. His 
subject was "Orchard Renovation." 
Mr. Drew outlined briefly the causes, 
such as neglect and ignorance, of the 
decay of New England apple orchards, 
but said that the difficulties in the way 
of saving these orchards were not 
insurmountable. 

"The West has control of the fruit 
market at present, and we have our- 
selves to blame. Our main fault is 
our lack of organization. The West- 
erner's land and climate is no better 
than curs for fruit growing; their trees 
are no freer from scale and moth. 
But by perseverance, organization and 
pluck they have wrested our market 
from us. I think, however, that the 
western fruit-grower has seen palmiest 
days, and that now the East will make 
earnest efforts to regain the market." 
Mr. Drew went on to show how reno 
vating of old, neglected orchards is 
both qossible and profitable. He 
advocated pruning for a "low-down" 
tree" because it is-easier to spray and 
to gather fruit from. Spraying, he 
said, should not be considered a cure- 
all, it will only hold in check certain 
pests. He recommended the use of 
commercial fertilizer and more exten- 
sive orchard cultivation, as his last 
point he mentioned the thinning out of 
a tree's yield : "this produces larger, 
better fruit and puts less strain upon 
the tree." 

"There is a fortune awaiting those 
who specialize with perseverance and 
care in New England orchard growing. 
No place has more natural advantages 
than in this section and the successful 
fruit grower will find a market awaiting 
him close at hand." 

P. R. Ziegler, representative of the 
B. L. K.(Burnell-Lawrence-Kennedy) 
Milking Machine Co. gave a short talk 
on his firm's product. "Some years 



debating club. 
On Wednesday evening at the 
Debating club the question of "Com- 
mercial Reciprocity with Canada" 
was debated. In the absence of some 
of the assigned debaters, the subject 
was thrown open to the club and a 
very interesting and instructive discus- 
sion followed. The information gained 
from hearing such popular questions 
discussed is worth the trouble of attend- 
ing the meetings and more should 
attend, If only for that object. 



THE CHEMISTS OF M. A. C. 

A post-card mailing- catalog of all 
men of this profession is to be put to 
use, within a few days, in the joint 
interests of the men and the college. 
Every M. A. C. student of Chemistry, 
young or old, is requested to send a 
postal with his name, occupation and 
present address to I. F. Lux, Amherst, 
Mass. 

DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Dr. J. B. Lindsey has been elected 
vice-director of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 



BEST FARM IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, bath room, 
hot and cold water; best farm in this 
section, running spring water; 40 acres 
tillage, 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber; plenty of fruit and many other good 
features. $6000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 

W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST. MASS. 



ago," he said "the milking machine 
and the aeroplane were looked upon as 
impossibilities, but now both are com- 
ing into their own. The principle of 
the milking machine is of a pulsating 
vacuum controlled by valves. The 
pulsations must be regular or the Im- 
— -^— " ! perfect vacuum resulting, slows up the 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, ! milkin s As an ^ vestment the 

machine is a thing a dairyman can 
hardly do without, for it cuts down 
labor, helps him keep more cows 



J. H. TROTT 



■ MIIIMW., *»• — -. ... — — — — . ... — . 

Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



because less time is required per cow 
for milking and it makes him virtually 
independent of help." Mr. Ziegler 
spoke also upon the vacuum-cleaner 
for cleaning off cows after brushing. 



ALUMNI NEWS 
How about the Junior Prom. 
Feb. 25th. Invitations may be 
procured from A. P. Bursley, 'n, 
16 North College. 

The Pacific Coast alumni held their 
iirst dinner at Los Angeles. Cal., Dec. 
31st. Dr. G. E. Stone was sent by 
the college as its representative. The 
meeting sent greetings to President 
Butterfield: "Meeting a complete 
success. Twenty M. A. C. men 
send greetings. (Signed)R. E.Smith." 

Among recent visitors at M. A. C. 
have been: F. J. Smith '90, R. A. 
Cooley '94, G. A. Drew '97, R. J. 
Smith '01. W. A. Munson and P. F. 
Williams '05, M. H. Clark, Jr., and 
J. H. Walker 07, Barry, Clark, Cobb, 
Hutchlns, Lindblad '08,Crosby, Noble, 
Oliver, Putnam, Thompson and Thom- 
son '09. 

•7$. Wm. H. Bowker has resigned 

from the Board of Trustees of M. A. 

C. 

'83. S. M Holman of Attleboro 

has been reelected to the Massachu- 
setts House of Representatives. 

Ex-'85. —Charles S. Cutler died 
Sept. 3 at his home in Arlington. 

'87. E. F. Richardson of Millis, 

was elected lecturer of state grange, 
at a recent meeting at Springfeld. 

E X . '87. — John J. Shaughnessy has 
been inaugurated mayor of Marlboro. 
He has associated with him in the city 
government on the school board, E. 
D. Howe '81 and F. H. Brown '00. 
His honor will especially welcome '87 
men at the city hall. 

*89.— R. P. Sellew visited friends 
about college Jan. 19th. 

'91, H. M. Howard lectured be- 
fore the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society Jan. 15th, on "Use of Water 
in Commercial Gardening." 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 25, 1910. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a; Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from i A. M, to 4 A.M. 



RE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'to, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



'91. —Walter A. Brown died of 
accidental gas asphyxiation Jan. 18 at 
Springfield. He leaves a widow and 
three children. Mr. Brown was born 
at Lowell in 1869. During his child- 
hood the family removed to Feeding 
Hills. At M. A. C. he was a member 
of his class football team, of the 
Washington Irving Literary Society 
and C. S. C. ; was first lieutenant and 
adjutant of the battalion, leader of the 
college choir and class orator. After 
graduation he entered the Springfeld 
city engineer's office and later became 
assistant ergireer. In 1907 he 
removtd to Greenfield where he 
entered business for himseif. He 
married Miss Stella Price of Iowa City. 
la., in 1896. 

'91.— N. D. Whitman, civil engi- 
neer for the Reinforced Concrete Pipe 
Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 

'92. — G. E. Taylor, Jr. has been 
elected president of the Franklin Agri- 
cultural society at Greenfield. 

'92.— R. P. Lyman, Obstetrics, 
General Surgery, Kansas City Veter- 
inary College, Kansas City, Mo. 

'95. — H. L. Frost of Arlington has 
been elected to the Board of Trustees 
of M. A. C. to succeed S. C. Damon 
who has moved from the state. He 
has been appointed to the Experiment 
Station Committee. 

97. — J. L. Bartlett has resigned his 
position with the U. S. Weather 
Bureau and is at his home in Sals- 
bury. 

97. — L. F. Clark is taking special 
work in agriculture at the University 
of Iowa. 

'97. — G. D. Leavens will lecture at 
Columbia University in February, on 
"Artificial Fertilizers; Their Relation 
to the Soil, and Their Influence on 
Plants." 

In his new edition oi the standard 
work, "Principles and Practice of Ag- 
ricultural Analysis," Dr. H. W. 
Wiley, chief chemist of the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, quotes 
quite extensively from some of Mr. 
Leavens' writings. 

Mr. Leavens designed and built for 
the Coe-Mortimer Co. of New York 
of which he is second vice-president, 
the comnany's i.ew factory at Belfast, 
Me. In addition to supervising the 
manufacturing 0? the company's fac- 
tories, Mr. Leavens has charge of all 
the company's salesmen north of Vir- 
ginia and also attends to the adve- 
tising and propaganda work. 

'99. — Married, Jan. 8, in Spring- 
field, Frederick H. Turner of Great 
Barrington to Miss Theresa MalUry. 
The bride is a daughter of Rev. R. 
DeW. Mallary, President of the 
American International Cohege of 
Springfield. 

'01. — R. I. Smith, entomologist of 
North Carolina Experiment Station, 
attended the Boston meeting of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science in December and 
visited college. 




THE H. L. FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 

SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



At the Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 18-24, 1909, fruit grown <>n Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, ( Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Four 

Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by Mk. 
Georgi .\ Drew, of Connecticut, M. A. C Class 
of 1897. (Our pamphlet '• Up To Date FruitGrow- 
ing M is sent free if you mention T/n College Signal.) 



The Coe-Mortimer Co. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



We also distribute from Boston, Mass, Belfast. Me., Baltimore, 
Md., Wilmington, N.C., Savannah, (la., and < hailestun, S.C. 



l^\l lIYlj^\ciQASiE!TTBl& 

* 20 for 15 cts. O 

CTRAW RIDE. Night air snappy. 
^ Full Moon. Jolly party. 
Songs, laughter and Fatima 
Cigarettes. 

The cigarette with a characteris- 
tic flavor that pleases and satisfies. 
Perfectly blended. Mellowed and 
cured for two years. 

Smooth and satisfying. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 




8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 25, 1910. 



'08. — H. K. Hayes has severed his 
connection with the United States 
Bureau of Plant Industry and has 
occupied a fine position at the Con- 
necticut Experiment Station in the 
division of Plant Breeding. During 
the winter he is studying and working 
up data at the Bussey Institute, 
Jamaica Plains. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Below is a list of courses offered by the College for the first time in 
1909- 19 10. Several other courses have been greatly amplified and extended. 
In the Department of Agricultural Education: 

Seminar in Education. 

In the Division of Agriculture: 

Kield Crop Improvement. Advanced Soils. Manures and Fertilizers. P^Pfe^**^"* 
>vement, Dairy Cattle. Feeding and Management of Pa.m Live Stock, Market Milk. Hutter 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Theodore Roosevelt of the class of 
1880 at Harvard was elected president 
of the Harvard alumni association at a 
meeting of the executive committee 
of the association last week. Mr. 
Roosevelt will succeed Dr. Charles 
W. Eliot, who was elected president 
of the alumni after the announcement 
of his resignation as president of the 
university. He will be the 34th pres- 
ident to head the association. John 
Quincy Adams of the class of 1787 
was the first president, and he was 
succeeded by Edward Everett of the 
class of 1811. One of the principal 
duties of the president is to preside at 
the meeting of the alumni association 
held in Memorial hall, Cambridge, on 
the afternoon of commencement day. 
At that time he will introduce as 
speakers the governor of Massachu- 
setts, the president of the university, 
and a number of other prominent men 
who are guests of the faculty at the 
time. At the same meeting James 
J. Storrow of the class of 1885 was 
elected chief marshal of the alumni 
association for commencement day. 



LARGE BUDGET ASKED 

[Continued from first page.] 



lmpro.v 

Making, Manufactured Milk Products. 

In the Department of Chemistry: 

Advanced Analysis, Chemistry of Sugar Making and Refining. 

In the Division of Horticulture: 

The Literature of Horticulture, Practical Pomologv (special), Greenhouse Itosign and Con- 
struction* Fall Greenhouse Crops, Theory of Landscape Art, Ornamental Garden.ng. 

In the Division of Humanities: 

Department of Language and Literature— 

Iraiiiinn Course (double course i, Agricultural Journalism (double course), Periodical Writ- 
in*, Proseminar in Journalism (doublV course). Individual Heading. Khzabethan Literature, I ^ 
tan and West ration I iterature Early Eighteenth Century Literature, Middle Eighteenth Century 

Uerafure^S 
i" Advanced I iterary Study. Oration, Argumentation and Debate Advanced French (double 
c "urs'ei I French I /anguaRe and Literature (double course), Advanced German (double course), 
Readings ^andlnvestTgatl'onCGernian) (double courses History and Interpretation of Music. 

Department of Political Science— 

Economic History, The History of New England, The History of Ideals. 

In the Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Civil Engineering: 

Analytic Mechanics, Descriptive Geometry. 

In the Department of Physical Education and Hygiene: 

Hygiene, Elementary Gymnastics, Graded Gymnastics, Heavy Gymanastics. Training Course, 
Advanced Gymnastics. 

In the Department of Rural Social Science: 

Elements of Agricultural Economics, Historical and Comparative Agriculture, Specific Pro- 
blems in Agricultural Economics, Seminar (double course). 

The term "double course" indi cates that the tourse is given for both semesters of the year. 

SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 
J. F. Adams, Manager 
G. A. Lodge, Jr.. Manager 
R. S. Eddy, Manager 
L. G. Schermerhorn, Manager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 
H. W. Blaney, Manager 
F. A. Castle, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 
R. H. Allen, President 
L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 
H. W. French, President 
H. J. Baker, President 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



000 ; for annual repairs and improve- 
ments to the college buildings and 
other property, $15,000; for additional 
teaching and office equipment, $10- 
000. These latter two items are asked 
for so as to obviate the necessity of 
applying to the Legislature every year 
for appropriations to meet the demands 
which naturally are made for such 
needs. 

State appropriations for current an- 
nual income take effect Dec. 1st, fol- 
lowing the enactment of the bills. To 
allow operations to begin Sept, 1st, 
an additional sum equal to one fourth 
of the above items for maintenance, 
instruction, normal department, short 
courses, graduate school, and grounds, 
is also requested, together with an item 
of $18 I 000_ to meet an increase in 
current expenses of the college year 
1910. 



The College Senate, 
Athletic Board, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Nineteen Hundred and 
Nineteen Hundred and 
Y. M. C. A., 
Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Debating Club, 



Eleven Index, 
Twelve Index, 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLEfi 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AGOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mim. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rate* 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form 0/ Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving O. Davis, Agent, 12 North 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the . News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

c? MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XX. 



/ 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 8, 1910. 



No. 16 



new a .ege paper $3224 ACTUAL COST OF BOARD PER WEEK GAME R00M 0PENING 



The New "M. A. C. Literary Monthly" 
An Excellent First Number. 

Yesterday the M. A. C. Literary 
Monthly made its debut. The Signal 
extends its cordial welcome and best 
wishes to this small, yet very worthy 
new contemporary and exponent of the 
literary ability of Aggie men. 

This first number, — there are to be 
four more this spring, — is a very modest 
little pamphlet of 16 pages. Its con- 
tents are a credit to the writers and 
editors. Louis C. Brandt is editor-in- 
chief, F. L. Thomas '10, manager. 
The remaining members of the board 
are W. R. Clarke '10, B. Ostrolenk 
Ml, R. N. Hallowell '12. 

The first article, B. Otrolenk's, is 
editorial in tone. It states clearly the 
Lit's position and purposes, — "an 
Indispensible part of the college" "to 
set standards .... in the use of 
English," to provide an opportunity 
for activity" to those "of a philosophic 
and artistic temperament." 

'•The Encounter," by Hallowell '12, 
was plainly called forth by present 
athletic conditions at M. A. C, to 
direct attention to the teal standing ol 
athletics in student life. The 
contents : 

"To My Love." Poem, Anonymous 

"M.A. C. Literary Monthly," Article, 

B. Ostrolenk Ml 
"The Encounter," Story.R.N. Hallowell '12 
"The Attack." Story, D. F. Baker *13 

• Winter," Poem, W. R. Clarke '10 

"The Desert." Article, A. W. Dodge "12 
"The Old Woman's Shawl. ' Story, 

J. C. Folsom M0 
Editorials. 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly 91. 



NEW INSTRUCTOR 

C. S. Heller has been appointed 
Instructor in Market Gardening to take 
the place vacated by Harold F. Tomp- 
son. Mr. Heller graduated in 1902 
from the National Farm School at 
Dcyiestown, Penn. After graduation 
he assumed management of the coun- 
try estate of L. Tanenbaum at High- 
mount, N. Y. Later, he became 
superintendent of one of the experi- 
mental farms operated b> the United 
States Department of Agriculture 
under Professor Spillman. In 1908, 
he graduated from the Michigan Agri- 
cultural College, and subsequently 
served as superintendent of the Haight 
Agricultural School, at Muskegon, 
Mich., and later as assistant horticul- 
turist at the Virginia Truck Experi- 
ment Station, at Norfolk, Va., whence 
he comes to M. A. C. With his 
thorough preparation and broad expe- 
rience, it is expected that Mr. Heller 
will make a strong addition to the 
Division of Horticulture, and a worthy 
successor to Mr. Tompson. 



Blaney's Report a Surprise to All. Some Things to 
Think About Before Mass Meeting. 



There is probably no one issue that 
the students are so eager to learn about 
as the details of the dining hall in- 
vestigation. Mr. Hazen, the chair- 
man of the investigating committee, 
being obliged to be away from college 
at least a week longer on account of 
the sickness of his mother, has asked 
me to make a statement and report on 
the affairs of the dining hall and to 
postpone the mass-meeting until he re- 
turns to college. Therefore there will 
be no mass-meeting this week to dis- 
cuss this proposition. 

As Mr. Hazen outlined in his last 
optn letter to The Sicnal, a two 
weeks trial was made by the committee, 
in managing the dining hall, In over- 
seeing the buying, the serving, and to 
estimate the aciual cost of board for 
that period. Tnis we have done and it 
is the chief purpose of this article to 
explain to you the outcome of thai 
trial. An inventory was taken on 
Jan. 15, of the entire stock of food- 
stuffs on hand, and a similar inventory 
Jan. 29. Aiso, absolute account was 
taken of all goods purchased in that 
period. 1 will give you the exact state- 
ment first and explain the items later. 
The statement is this \ 

Amounts expended : — 



Inventory, 


$1,653.25 


Goods purchased, 


1,198.70 


Sub-waiters, 


191.94 


Waiters, 29 at $6.00 


174.00 




$3,236.59 


Amounts received : — 




Inventory, 


$1,344.91 


Transients, 


97.20 


Balance, 


1,794 48 



$3,236.59 

Total weeks board fur- 
nished, 556^ 

Total cost of board (bal- 
ance above), $1,794.48 

Rate per week, $3,224 

Under " amounts expended " are all 
debit accounts, and under " amounts 
received " are ali credit accounts. The 
$174.00 paid to waiters is balanced on 
J the credit side in figuring the rate per 
week. 

This rate per week comes as a sur- 
prise to the committee as it does to 
you, as we cannot account for the dif- 
ference in the cost of board as we have 
proved it, from the cost as it was repre- 
sented to be three weeks ago. Al- 
thoguh I have been unable to investi- 
gate the accounts which led to the 



statement that at Nov. 30 board cost 
at the rate of $4.01 per week, as these 
accounts were never saved, yet the 
two weeks trial has proved conclusively 
that it did not cost that, or else it need 
not have cost that. 

Let me say right now however, that 
board cannot be furnished at the dining- 
hall permanently under the present 
system at so low a figure as $3.25 a 
week. That is, if we put the price 
down to that figure, as at this rate the 
equipment is not figured at all, and as 
n»w dishes, glass, and silverware and 
kitchen utensils have to be bought from 
time to time, the dining-hall must needs 
have a little larger income than $3.25 
per week would permit. However, I 
am prepared to say that the price of 
board should be lowered to $3:50 per 
week. 




*** HO^ 
TWLRMOMLTLR 

1— ^!500 
•♦75 



A25 
^300 




? 



I have said that I am not able to 
place sufficient cause for the surprising 
difference in the two reports as to the 
price of board, and doubt if there will 
be a cause explained for this difference 
as it certainly did not come from the 
saving in the waste or from the buying, I 
as in the latter there has been no j 
change made. Everything except the 
serving was run exactly as it had been 
heretofore except, I may say, the qual- 

[ Continued on page S.J 



Long Awaited Addition to Social Union 
a Reality at Last. The Rules. 

An event, toward which a majority 
of the students a'id some of the faculty 
have been looKing forward for some 
time, happened last Friday evening in 
the opening of the Game Room In 
North College. 

The Game Room is a part of the 
Social Union which now composes the 
large Union Room, the Trophy Room 
in the western end of North College 
and the Game Room, situated in the 
eastern end of the basement of the 
same building. The equipment in the 
new room includes two pool tables, 
one billiard table, and card tables and 
the necessary accoutrements. The 
room is furnished in mission style, 
with mission furniture and a permanent 
bench running along three sides, 
making a comfortable, cozy effect. 
The room will be under the supervis- 
ion of the Union Committee, a com- 
mittee composed of faculty members 
and members from the Senate and 
consisting of the following: Dr. j. B. 
Paige, Mr. Kenney, Mr. Watts, 
LeonarJ, Brooks and Haynes 1910 
and Bursley 19! I. Burke 1910 has 
been appointed janitor of the room. 

The students held an informal open 
ing of tne room Friday evening, at 
which about 100 were present. Pres- 
ident Leonard of the Senate read the 
rules which the committee had adopted 
for the management and care of the 
room. 

After the reading of the rules Mr. 
Leonard introduced President Butter- 
field who related something of the 
history of the Social Union, the chang- 
ing of the old reading room with its 
dingy furniture into the trophy room, 
then the Union Room from the damp 
empty rooms of the first floor of North, 
and finally the Game Room from the 
janitor's storehouse in the basement. 
He showed how it had been from the 
start a co-operative scheme, a combi- 
nation of college administration and 
students and hoped it would continue 
to be so. The President ended by 
congratulating the men on their fii.e 
social equipment now installed in the 
college and gave the opinion that 
every man ought to get good from 
these advantages. 

The evening was closed by exhibi- 
tion games of pool and billiards. F. 
A. Prouty 'II and Racicot ' 1 1 played 
50-point pool, Prouty winning 50 to 42. 
Brandt '10 defeated H. A. Brooks 
'10 at pool, 50 to 35. Parker '12 
defeated Covell '13 at 50-point bil- 
liards, 50 to 38. 

Continual on pace 8.] 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 8, 19 10. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 8, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910. 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 19 10. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911, 



HERBERT W. BLANEY, 1911, 
FRANK A. PROUTY. 1911. 



Editor-in-Chief. 
College Notes. 
Athletic Notes. 
Alumni Notes. 
Department Notes. 



College Notes. 



News Editor of this Issue 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. '10. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. u. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday, 6-30 to 7-30 e. u. 

Wednesday 9-15 to 10 a. m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. M. 
Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 u. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910, Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 191 I, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912, Circulation. 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Faknham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. 



ruary Lit 
efforts. 



ought to encourage greater 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, FEB. 8. No. 16 



We enter upon 
"Lend a hand." 



a new semester. 



C. A. 

ard '11 
petition. 



Lodce, Jr., and P. W. Pick- 
have entered Signal com- 



rank A. Prouty '11 of Worces- 
ter, the junior competitor with highest 
rank, became a member of the Signal 
Board following the resignation of 
Arthur H. Sharpe 'II. 



College fire protection ought to 
receive more attention. The battalion 
once had a well organized and drilled 
fire squad, but not for several years. 
Last spring a few cadets of the bat- 
talion were given a little drill with the 
fire apparatus. This fall extinguishers 
have been placed in the college build- 
ings. A new hose cart has been 
equipped and placed on the upper floor 
of the heating station. Apparatus is 
good and sufficient; hydrants are 
numerous. 

But it is probably safe to say very 
few students know anything about the 
fire equipment ; still less know how to 
handle it. There ought to be a drilled 
and capable fire squad resident on the 
campus and some means of calling 
them out quickly in response to an 
alarm. In five minutes a line of hose 
could be laid on the west side of the 
campus, and nearly as soon on the 
east, while it would take the town fire 
department nearly half an hour to 
arrive and do the same. The advan- 
tage of such quick work is obvious. 
But however efficient the apparatus, 
it is nearly useless without a capable 
crew to handle it. 




With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4.00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 



Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

oo. 



REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 



JAMES F. PAGE. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Feb. 



Feb. 



Play 



Last Saturday H. F. Tompson, 
instructor in Market Gardening, left 
M. A. C. to go into practical work for 
himself. M. A. C. will loose the 
presence of this friend, but he will 
continue to make felt his active inter- 
est in the college. Mr. Tompson 's 
work has been performed quietly, yet 
effectively, so far as limited facilities 
permitted, both in and out of class, 
and among students ai.d alumni. He 
carries with him in his new venture the 
best wishes of the Signal and the stu- 
dent body. 



Feb. 



The Signal extends to its new con- 
temporary, the M. A. C. Lit., a hearty 
welcome and best wishes. The first 
number of the little monthly is very 
modest. Its contents are well written 
and well chosen. We believe they 
represent some of the best M. A. C. 
literary ability. The Signal first 
opposed the starting of the Lit, believ- 
ing conditions hardly fit. It has been 
hard enough to keep its own poor 
standards. The Lit's standards must 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

8 — 7-00 P. m. Senior 

rehearsal, chapel. 
9 — 1 15 p. m. Assembly, Dr. 

Benjamin A. Trueblood, Boston. 

6-45 p. m. Debating Club, 

Agricultural Lecture Room. 

7-00 p. m. Senior Play rehear 

sal, chapel. 

0—6-45 p. m. Y. M. C. A. at 

chapel, Mr. F. B. McKay, 

leader. 
Feb. 11—7-00 p. m. Senior Play 

rehearsal, chapel. 
12 — 3-00 p. m. Hockey on pond, 

M. A, C. vs. Trinity. 

6-30 p. m. Social Union Enter- 
tainment at chapel, reading by 

F. B. McKay. 

7-00 p.m. Senior Play rehearsal 
13 — 5-00 p. m. Vesper service, 

chapel, Rev. Charles F.Carter, 

Lexington. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <& SHOE 
REPAIRING 

at 



LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to < 
All kinds of Shoe Shine! 
Open Sunday until 12 M 



m. 



DEUEL'S 
DRUG 



Feb. 



Feb. 



5 1.00 



INFORMAL 

The third Informal Dance of the 
year was held in the Drill Hall last 
Saturday afternoon and evening and in 
spite of the heavy demands on the 
purse, forced upon us at this season, 
over sixty of our socially inclined 
young men turned out with their fair 
friends. Immediately following exam- 
inations, the informal was an especial 
pleasure. 

The Drill Hall was decorated some- 
what after the usual style, though 
there is always something new and 



Gillette Safety Razors 
Gillette Blades 
Gem Junior Safety Razors, 

Ever Ready Safety Razors 

Blades 

Colgate's Rapid Shave Powder 

Colgate's Talcum Powder 

Tooth Powders and Tooth Pastes 



R. LEVIN E 

1 1 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



THURBER'S 



Next To Postoffic* 



Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants,|etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



be much better, the task more diffi- 
cult. Its editors have set themselves i pleasing in the details, and that of Sat- 
to promoting the development of good urday was no exception. Large ma- 
writers, a hard task and one which roon streamers were hung from the 



has the Signal's unqualified approval 
and support. The success of the Feb- 



several arc lights to the walls, which 
were hung with numerous Massachu- 



Deuel's Drue Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



NEXT TO COLLEGE STORE 



COLLECE BARBER SHOP 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

E. Y. Cosby Prop. 



setts banners, interspersed with those 
of other colleges. The platform for 
the orchestra was placed in the center 
of the hall, and was surrounded with 
potted plants of all kinds. The north- 
ern end of the hall was curtained off 
by an immense American flag. The 
southern end was occupied by the 
patronesses In one corner and the 
refreshment table. 

Music was furnished by Derrick's 
Westfield orchestra. During the in- 
termission, between 6 and 7, Mrs. 
Rowe served an excellent supper at 
Draper Hall. The tables were prettily 
decorated with potted plants and 
flowers. Dancing lasted from 4 until 9. 

The patronesses were : Mrs. P. H. 
Smith and Mrs. C. R. Duncan of the 
college, Miss Heine of Smith and 
Miss Edgerton of Mt. Holyoke. The 
committee in charge consisted of : R. 
H. Allen, chairman, E. H. Turner, 
treasurer, R. P. Armstrong, W. E 



Leonard, R. A. Waldron and L. S. 
McLaine. 

Those who attended the informal 
were : — 

1910— Annis, J. C. Bailey. Blaney. 
Brandt, H. A. Brooks. Brown, Fol- 
som, Francis, Holland, Johnson, 
Nickless, and Thomas. 

1911— Allen, Baker, Howe, Lodge, 
McGraw, Morse, Nickerson, Ostro- 
lenk, Sharpe and Stevenson. 

1912— Gaskill, Hallowell, Martin, 
Maxon, Moreau, Philbrick, Pratt, 
Robinson, Shaw, Southwick, Tower, 
Walker, Williams and Wood. 

1913 — Adams, Baker, Borden, 
Bursley, Caldwell. Clegg, Cole, 
Cooper, Goodnough, Griggs, Harring- 
ton, Hurley, Jones, Patch, Pellett, 
Series and Turner. Also J. R. Parker 
'08 and Day and Selkregg of the short- 
course. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



Folsom 'io 



Nickless 'io 



Aggie 



Store 



ill. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Dean George F. Mills is critically 



Clapp 'i2 



Beers '12 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

"DON'T KICK" if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Dropper. 
Get the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

''You Blow It 

To Fill It." 

Guaranteed to give satisfac- 



tion. 



SOLD BY 



E. E, MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



The 47th annual report of the col 
lege has been published as the Jan- 
uary "M. A. C. Bulletin." 

The class basketball teams are hard 
at work in preparation for the coming 
inter-class series. The freshman team 
is showing up unusually well for a class 
team. 

A number of the post-graduates and 
faculty have organized a "gym" class 
and are receiving Instruction from Dr. 
Reynolds every Monday and Thursday 
evening. 

At a meeting of the Hampshire 
Agricultural Society, Prof. E. A. 
White was elected superintendent of 
the division of flowers, fruit, vegetables 1 
and grain, and Prof. W. R. Hart of ■ 
juvenile contests in the fair to be held 
Sept. 20, 1910 at Amherst. 

The seniors in Market Gardening 
went to Boston Jan. 27, and spent the | 
rest of the week studying market gar- 
dening conditions. They visited the J 
Boston produce markets and cold stor- 
age plants and big greenhouse plants in 
Arlington and Belmont. H. F. Tomp- 
son directed the trip. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh, who has been 
granted leave of absence, and his son 
Dan, sailed from New York for Ger- 
many last Saturday. Professor 
Waugh will, among other places, study 
landscape gardening work at the Uni- 
versity of Berlin. His address will be 
in care of Hamburg-America Line, 
8 Unter den Linden, Berlin, Germany. 

A new book by Professor Waugh has 
just come from the press of the 
Orange Judd Company. It is called 
"The Landscape Beautiful," and is 
further described by the author as "a 
study of the utility of the natural land- 
scape, its relation to human life and 
happiness, with the application of these 
principles in landscape gardening and 
in art in general." The book is a col- 
lection of 17 essays and it is perme- 
ated with the spirit of woods and fields 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Stylos are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



"Who saya New England in barren?" 

\Z2\ Bush. Shelled Corn from One Acre 
6 \ \ Bush. Potatoes from One Acre 

ON STOCKBRIDGE 

ALONE 



BROCKTON ihoa-cuttar, Mi. A \\ Batter. *ho carries oa a snail milk 1.11:1, 

with the .ml oi two M.iis, raised on mm .n >•• wiili the SIik kbridge Spw lal Manure 

In tin- 
rtishels, 

\\ hn says 



A 

— »- — — - - --, ■.••■>'• ir.i •'■■< .]<ii i> nil 111" . I'" l\lll "n;i ' I " "I 1 ,1 

rot ' .01 n lu 1-1 bushel* "I ihelled 1 urn. sad won firs! pi ise In oai iw 1 onti st 
contest each of six contestants raised ovei loobushels pi eight ovei 90 bushels 

thirteen oyei So bushels, and liateen ovei yo butheli shelled emu to tl» 
New England is barn n ■ 

A FARMER at Hope, Maine, not ia Aroostook County, Mr. <;. II. I u-da 

ytald of 611 bushels Green Mountain Potatoes from one acre on Stockbridge 

Manure for Pol lusirely. Thirty contestants raised crops rangii 661-1 

liusliels pat ten la varioui parti oi New England. Who s.i\s new Englind li barn n f 



HOW THEY DID IT 



Is told in ■ pamphlet, which also contain! 1 onditiom oi omi 191 

( ontests. On com hi* nfi'M li.ooo in prizes, I500 for quantity, f^oo for Quality of corn. 

. , 1 I r.._ :. .1. J__. ,11... . ». 1 .1 



; d Potato 1 1 Ise 



t 
ami $200 on potatoes Send fur it do-day. Why not compete! Whether yon win 01 
not, you ere using the l»-st fertilisers in tin- market, and an- sum- ..( good , ropi under 
normal weather conditions. The u-st is the 1 baapasl in the end, 

I 'tt~ If ymt have not u,i,l Mi B* m>kti 'i ' M I-eiti!it\. II v 

Fertilizers are M,ule, etc., semi you i mini, /.» <ofy. A'<» tulvettisiun in 

thi ti \ t. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 

43 CHATHAM ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum ar\d High Streets, 



Hartford, Coivfi. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing liushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkr S. Gardk. 



C&rp?rrler & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 8, 1910- 



WHAT ABOUT 



THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 



Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - 
Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. 
Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - ■ 

Rain Cloth, $3-5° P er >' d - Trouserings, 



$12.50 
$11.50 
$10.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 
$9.00 

$3-5° P er y ard - 



[ sell cloth at every college in New England. 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

UP" Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, 'io. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M.D. OILMAN. CA.MOFFET. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Stkebt. 

Worcester, Mass. 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

1 1. 00 

6 " dates 2cts. pieces 5octs. 

6 ■ dates 3ct. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25cts. 

25 " Broken Bank and Confederate 

Bills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars and 

Selling price list. 




GOX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



and streams and furnishes very enjoy- 
able as well as instructive reading. A 
pleasant feature is the excellence of 
the illustrations. The photographs 
have been reproduced unusually well, 
are done in a brown tone and are 
a striking feature of the book. 

TRACK 

Relay At B. A. A. Boston, Feb. 12. 

INTROSPECTION. 

To circumstantiate that our relay 
team will win in its match relay race 
with W. P. I. on this Saturday would 
be indiscreet. 

The men have beer working out well 
the last two weeks, marked improve- 
ment being apparent as the practicing 
has progressed. Two practice runs 
have been held, in each of which a 
first and a second team has been run. 
Individual ability has been manifest as 
a variable factor in each team at each 
time. This has been beneficial in giv- 
ing opportunity to better judge the men 
as qualifying for the final positions on 
the relay team. The experience 
gained by the men has been of very 
great value in giving the men track- 
wise judgment and in giving them con- 
fidence in their own ability. Captain 
Dickinson and Dr. Reynolds feel that 
the men as finally chosen will ably 
qualify as to speed ability, hard work 
and nerve. These two days past the 
practice has been conducted with a 
view to the final choice of men. Wed- 
nesday and Thursday the work will be 
light and Friday noon the team will 
leave for Boston. Captain Dickinson, 
Roberts, Jones, Lew, Dudley, Cowles, 
Barrows and Nei'son are the men 
qualifying and from which will be 
chosen the four relay men, one substi- 
tute and one dash (40 yards) man. 
The management feels that the team 
as sent down will run as a team unit 
doing even better than our team did 
last year. In good condition, the team 
will do its level best. 

All indications are that we will be 
victorious over our Polytechnical Insti- 
tute friends of Worcester City. 
(Signed), 

Roger S. Eddy, Mgr. 

The track team's work in the two 
practise meets with Amherst is very 
encouraging. In each meet there 
were two relays, the mile run, shot-put 
land high jump. In the first meet, 
held here, Jan. 26, Amherst won one 
relay, the shot-put and high jump, and 
we got the other relay and the mile. 

The second meet came the next 
Saturday at Amherst, but the races 
were postponed until last Saturday as 
the track was too slippery. Our teams 
got both relays, the mile and shot-put. 
Amherst tock the high jump. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 
know that their shoes are 

right. 
Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Hlock 
Mass. 



j«E. N. PARISEAU.j* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



WARREN AUTO CO., 

15 Maple Street, 
Northampton, - Mass. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



Autos fok Hire and Ex- 
change. 

We have the agency for the 



E x -'93. — Harlan F. Stone, brother 
of W. E. Stone '82. president of 

Purdue Univ., has been elected dean p ORD Cars you hear praised 

of the law school at Columbia Univer- go j^g]^ p[ ve passenger 

sity. This school is one of the best Tour j ^ all comp lete, 

of its nature in the country, hence the -q-^ ° 

significance of this appointment. $yOU. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 8, 1910. 



DINING HALL. 

[Continued from first page] 



ity of food was. better than usual. 
Whether this came from the fact that 
an investigation was going on and our 
supply firms were more careful than 
usual, I cannot say, but 1 do believe 
that a little mrre attention on the part 
of the buyer to the quality of meat 
and provisions bought wouH give this 
slightly better quality permanently. 

So much for the reoort on the pro- 
ven cost of board. I wish to offer a 
few suggestions for every man to be 
thinking about until the time for a mass- 
meeting, as these suggestions all have 
a direct bearing on the question at 
hand and will have to be discussed 
sooner or later. 

While the conmittee is no longer 
managing the dining- hall, the rules that 
were inforced then should be enforced 
now until a better and more compre- 
hensive set can be drawn up. The 
dining hall cannot be run now or at 
any other time without the co-opera- 
tion of the boarders and the waiters. 
While we did receive excellent co- 
operation for the most part during the 
two weeks of the trial, yet th-re were 
some instances where this rrit>ht have 
been better, and I wish to say right 
here most emphatically that the Fresh- 
man employees at the dining hall do 
not run things there and if they think 
they are going to, it is time to get 
other employees. 

The enforcement of the rules as re- 
gards the waiting and the serving 
should be enforced by the men hired 
for that purpose, and this leads me to 
another suggestion. We do not need 
two head waiters in the dining hall. 
We now have two, one a student and 
the other an outsider to perform the 
duties of head- waiter which heretofore 
were fulfilled by one man, a student. I 
do not advocate getting rid of the 
student head-waitershio. This is a 
position which should be held by a re- 
sponsible senior and the duties are no 
more than such a senior could per- 
form. 

Another suggestion which I would 
like to present is that of charging for 
" seconds " on meat orders and de- 
sert. There are three phases of this 
question to be considered. First, what 
is the attitude of the boarders ? Many 
say they are in favor of charging for 
seconds and many are against it. It is 
a fact that hardly a student here 
does wotk enough to require a large 
consumption of meat. If large, uniform 
orders were given as firsts, I don't be- 
lieve, to come down to facts, there 
would be one per cent, of the men 
need second orders. Secondly, to con- 
sider this question from the waiter's 
standpoint, it adds greatly to the work 
and trouble and often delays a waiter 
a considerable length of time. The 
third and most important consideration 
however, is the added expense caused 
by seconds. Since 40-50^ of the 
men ask for seconds nearly every day, 



it increases the meat item of expense 
almost one-half. Now if a charge of 
five cents were made for extra meat 
orders and three cents for extra des- 
serts, I don't believe there would be 
5 $ of the men order seconds. You 
can see at a glance what a great 
saving this would be in the expense ac- 
count. Now if board can be given 
for $3.50 per week with the present 
system, it could be furnished for $3.25 
or lower with charging for seconds on 
meat and dessert. Would this not be 
a fair proposition for all ? If a man 
wished seconds two or three times a 
week, his board bill would not be over 
what it is now under the present sys- 
tem, while the men not desiring sec- 
onds would get their board at a mini- 
mum. 

Another suggestion, which I cannot 
more than outline at this writing, is the 
establishment of a dining hall com- 
mittee consisting of four men ■ — two 
students, oreferably members of the Col- 
lege Senate, the treasurer of the college, 
and one other member of the faculty. 
This would be an advisory committee 
and would be of great influence in the 
appointment of waiterships, the head- 
waiter and student treasurer, and would 
go a great way in maintaining a high 
quality of board, (like preventing oleo- 
margarine for instance.) A committee 
of this sort would stop periodical jumps 
in the price of board. 

My last suggestion is along the line 
of the responsibility of the waiters at 
the dining hall. To put a permanent 
system into effect to keep board down 
to a rock bottom price, to charge for 
"seconds," or prevent unnecessary 
waste, the waiters must be responsible 
men. Can you tell me of any business 
house or restaurant hiring thirty men, 
where they do about as they please and 
respect no superior ? The waiters 
get fair wages, not as much as they 
should get however, and it is only right 
that they assume some responsibility 
in their business. If they cannot do 
what is right, why there are enough 
other needy men to take their positions. 
The college is not beholden to the 
waiters. 

In this article I have not touched 
the problem of the buying end of ex- 
pense. I have not, as I do not feel 
capable to as Mr. Hazen has specially 
attended to this but I feel sure that he 
has something to report along this line. 
We will hear from him at a mass- 
meeting in the near future. Mean- 
while, have the present rules enforced 
and co-operate for good board at low 
cost. 

Signed, 

Herbert W. Blaney. 



T. Iv. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To 'Reception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 



men CLASS 



>-■> 



fAILOR. . . 

Foreign and domestic woolem always on hand. These 
goods are of the most exclusive patterns, and my work is 

guaranteed to be tailored in the latest style and workmanship. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing and Pressing 

A Specially. 
Full Press Suits to Rent. The on fy place in town. 

A nice line of MEN'S FURNISHINGS. The famous 
Eagle Shirt, the E. & W. (Redman's Brand) Collars and 
Dress Shirts. Special Dancing Gloves and Dress Ties. 
Nice new line of Necktie Pins, Cuff Buttons and Studs. Bos- 
ton Garters, Suspenders, &c. 



LABROV/TZ 



1 1 Amity St. 



Phone 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



'05. — A. D. Taylor lectured before 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Soci- 
ety, Boston, Jan. 22, on "Continental 
Landscape Gardening." The lecture 
was illustrated by stereoptican views 
taken mostly by Mr. Taylor himself 
while in Europe. 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

( lass Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 8, 1910. 



M. A. C. 2, WESLEYAN 0. 

Friday afternoon, Jan. 28, the 
hockey team defeated Wesleyan 2-0. 
The game was played on the Amherst 



given for continued service. As here- 
tofore, service as a reader carries a 
2-hour credit each semester ; but here- 
after only those readers who have not 




GOODS FOR MEN. 



College rink because of the poor con- ! alread y laken the training courses 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



v ry) English and Scotch Woolens. 

r ^i THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

i CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•••.•.••••••••••'••• 



..... 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE OLD CORKER DRUG STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes. 



dition of our own. Both teams 
showed a lack of team work, more 
noticeably in the case of Wesleyan. 
There was a change in our lineup, 
with Adams at point and Walker at 
cover point, and that combination 
seemed to work better. 

During the first half, the play was 
well divided, sometimes in ours arc! 
sometimes in Wesleyan'"; terrllory 
Several times Folke of the visitors 
succeed in carrying the puck the 
length of the rink, but he was unable 
to score. Towards the end of the 
half, Captain Brandt succeeded in 
getting the puck through the goal for 
the first score. The second half was 
much the same as the first. Brandt 
shot a goal soon after the opening of 
the half and that finished the scoring. 

Captain Brandt and Peckham 
excelled for us, while Foike did good 
work for Wesleyan. Ackerman also 
did well at goal, making several good 
stops. 

The lineup : 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 

J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



Holland's Block. 



STEAM PITTING, 
(.AS PIT I 1NG, tinning, 



l'hoenix Row 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLOHIST 

Store Hunt's lilock, Amkkkst, Mass. 



Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



M. A. C. 








WESLEYAN 


Ackerman, 




g. 




Rich 


Adams, 




p.. 




Reynolds 


Walker, 




c p., 




Bernhardt 


Brewer, ) 
Heath. \ 
Bentley. J 












r. w.. 




Simmons 










Sanctuary, 




1. w.. 




Bacon 


Brandt (capt.). 




c. 




Harmmand 


Peckham. 




r., 




Folke 


Score— M. A 


C. 


2. Wesley: 


in 0. Goals 


— Brandt 2. Refe 


ree— W 


Ray Nye of Am- 


herst Umpires - 


-Wood 


and 


Thompson. 


Timer— H. L. 


C01 


ey. Ti 


me— 


20 and 15- 


minute periods. 











Telephone 59—4- 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



A Sped. ilt v of Repairing 

CHURCH Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkad Lights, 8tc 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

FLORICULTURE. 

On Jan. 22 the Floriculture classes 
gave a fine exhibiton of funeral designs 
at French Hall. There were 32 set 
pieces and fraternal emblems. The 

E B DICKINSON D. D S wh0ie exhibition showed excellent train- 

f ing and good taste. Commercial 
florists who saw the exhibit pronounced 
the designs to be of high market value. 



DENTAL 

Williams BLOCK. 



ROOMra 

Amherst, M \ss. 



OWICI Hours: 
OtolUA.M. ItDOtOfll 



-"VI. 



BEST FARNI IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, bath room 
hot and cold water; best farm in this 
section, running spring water; 40 acres 
tillage, 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber; plentv of fruit and many other good 
features. $6000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole pror> 
ertv only $9000. 



Kther and Nitrous 
stered when desired 



Oxide Gas admin- 



J. H. TROTT 



W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36- 1 2 . 



Professor White has arranged for 
the following special lectures in flori- 
culture*: Feb. 8, Peter Fisher. "The 
development of the carnation;" 15,1 
M. A. Patten, "Carnation culture; "j 
21, W. H. Elliot, "Rose Culture;" 
March 1, E. O. Orpet, "Orchids ;" 
8. E. J. Canning. "The work of the 
private gardener. " 

On Jan. 21, E. J. Elder of Lord & 
Burnham Co. spoke to the Floricul- 
ture classes on "Greenhouse Heat- 
ing." His very interesting talk was 
illustrated by a large number of blue 
prints which have been given to the 
college. for purposes of instruction 

ENCL1SH. 

Important changes in the appoint- 
ment of theme-readers and the grant- 
ing of 



(Eng. Lang. 5 and 6) will be required 
to carry these courses as part of their 
work as readers; and readers who are 
required to take these courses will 
receive no additional credit therefor. 
As the training course credits can be 
applied on the Registrar's books for 
either sophomore or advanced credit, 
candidates for a readership can there- 
fore, by taking the training courses in 
advance, secure a credit for them not 
allowed if they be taken during the 
term of service as reader. Beginning 
with next semester, the training course 
work will be changed to adapt it to the 
need of prosoective readers. As far 
as possible, next year's readers will be 
selected before the summer vacation, 
and from those who have course 6. 
Men wishing to be considered for 
appointment should therefore plan to 
take course 6, and should at once 
consult Professor Neal for fuller 
information. 

A short story, entitled "The Ending 
of the Ways," by Prof. Robert W. 
Neal is published in the Burr Mcintosh 
Monthly for February. The incident 
concerns two Russian peasai.ts who 
have been drafted into a Cossack 
troop and are guarding the trans- Siber- 
ian railway, and develops the saying 
that the only roads to death are duty, 
friendship, and pleasure. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Prof. F. W. Morse, a graduate of 
W. P. I., has been engaged terriDor- 
arily as research chemist at the Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural Experiment 
station, to investigate the effect of dif- 
ferent elements of fertility upon the 
growth of asparagus. Especial atten- 
tion is being given at present to differ- 
ent amounts of nitrogen in influencing 
the storage of reserve material in the 
asparagus roots. Professor Morse 
was assistant chemist at the Massachu- 
setts station with Professor Goessmann. 
Since 1889 he has been chemist, and 
later vice-director, of the New Hamp- 
shire Experiment station, and also 
professor of organic chemistry in the 
New Hampshire college. 



ACR1CULTURE. 

The division has recently added to 
its equipment an International Instru- 
ment Co. electric centrifuge for soil 
analysis, also an electric mechanical 
agitator. In addition, a Purdy electric 
centrifuge is being installed. 



ALUMNI NEWS 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 
The present staff of The College 
Signal goes out of office about the 
first of next month. In order to have 
my accounts settled at that time I wish 
each subscriber who has not paid his 
credit for theme-reading are subscription to please do so at once. 



announced. Increased pay is to be E. Farnham Damon, Bus. Mgr. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 8, 19 10. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A.M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundrv, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt 'to for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



ATTENTION ! —Class of 1909, 
M. A. C. — The time for getting out 
the class letter is at hand and is pass- 
ing. Some fine letters have been 
received but there are many yet who 
have not been heard from. The sec- 
retary would like to hear from these as 
soon as possible that the work may not 
be delayed nor rushed at the last. 
C. S. Putnam, Secretary, 

Turner Center, Me. 

The annual meeting and banquet of 
the Connecticut V dley Alumni Asso- 
ciation will be held at the Hotel 
Heublein, Hartford, Conn., at 7 p. m. , 
on Friday, Feb. 18, 1910. All 
alumni and former students are cor- 
dially invited to attend. Dinner tick- 
ets, $2.50. 

W. B. Hatch, Secretary. 

F. Lux, Arrh-rst, desires, for the 
post-card mailing catalog of the chem- 
ists of M. A. C. the addresses and 
occupation of the former special stu- 
dents, Dr. S. S. Garrigner and J. E. 
Heye. 

TI.— W, H. Bowker has resigned 
from the Experiment Station Commit- 
tee of the M. A. C. Board of Trus- 
tees, not from the board itself as 
announced in the last Signal. 

'82. — As a representative of the 
Agricultural Press League. H. Myrick 
was a witness before the house com- 
mittee on post-offices at Washington, 
Jan. 28, at the hearing on the pro- 
posed increase of second class mail 
rates. Mr. Myrick explained his pub- 
lished statements which had been 
severely criticised as reflecting upon 
government officials. 

'82.— J. E. Wilder has been elected 
president of the Union League Club of 
Chicago. 

Ex-'82. — H. A. Parsons, who is a 
member of the State Board of Agri- 
culture, has been appointed to the 
Dairy Bureau by Governor Draper. 

*92. - F. G. Stockbridge, R. F. D. 
3, Englishtown, N. J. He has bought 
a farm near Freehold. 

'98.— George H. Wright with Mil- 
ler & Co., Brokers, 29 Broadway, 
New York City. Residence, 282 
McDonough St., Brooklyn. 

Ex-'99. — A. A. Boutelle, Superin- 
tendent, Wellington Farm, Wellesley 
Farms. 

hx-'99. — Dr. George F. Keenan, 
Surgeon, 85 Newbury St., Boston. 

Ex-'99. — C. E. Stacy, Rancher and 
Cotton grower, Ben Bolt, Mences Co., 
Tex. 

'00.— R. D. Gilbert, Chemist and 
Superintendent for Bowker Fertilizer 
Co., 43 Chatham St., Boston. 

'05, — Born Jan. 18th, at Rutland, 
a son, Edwin Forrest, to Mr. and 
Mrs. H. D. Crosby. 

'05. — H. F. Tompson, Mgr., 
Reade Fruit Farm and Market Gar- 
den, Seekonk. Address, Attleboro, 
R. F. D. 4. 

»09. — O. F. Barnes, Jr., Green- 
house Manager, Elmwood, Conn. 




THE H. L. FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters ani Entomologists 



STAMFORD. CONN. 



THOMAS 



PHOSPHATE POWDER 



(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE 



SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



At the Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 1S-24, 1 909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, ( Basic Slaff Phosphate) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Pour 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal This fruit was raised hy Mr. 

George A Drew, of Connecticut, M. A. C, Class 
of 1897. (Our pamphlet " Up To Date Fruit Grow- 
ing" is sent free it you mention The College Signal.) 



The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



We also distribute from Boston, Mass, Belfast, M< - ., Baltimore, 
lid., Wilmington, N.t\, Savannah, 0.1., and I !narkston, S.C 



TURKISH 



BLEND 



FATIMA 

20 for 15 cis. *) 




A/^ARSITY race. Eight muscular com- 
rades rowing in perfect rhythm. The 
flag of the old Alma Mater bursts upon 
the breeze. Victory. Then the long 
ride back to town on the train — and 
Fatima Cigarettes. 

You enjoy the fine blend of Turkish tobacco, the cool 
rich flavor, and you have ten extra cigarettes. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 









GAME ROOM OPENING 

I Continued from first page-1 



The game room rules : 

1. The room will be open accord 
ing to the following schedule: Mon- 
days, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thurs- 
days, 7-30 a. M.-8-30 p. m. Fridays, 
Saturdays and holidays, 7-30 a. m.- 
10-30 p. M. The room will not be 
open on Sundays. 

2. All persons using the pool or 
billiard tables shall pay for such use at 
the following rates : Straight pool, one 
cent per cue per player. Games 
other than straight pool, ten cents per 
hour per table. Billiards, ten cents 
per hour per table. 

3. Payment shall be made before 
the player leaves the room, at the 
box provided for this purpose. 

4. Persons desiring to use any of 
the tables shall, upon entering the 
room, register their names, and If 
others are using the tables, shall play 
in turn, under the time restrictions 
herein stated. 

5. There shall be absolutely no 
betting or gambling of any kind in the 
game room. 

6. All the tables shall be consid- 
ered "closed" tables; one person or 
set of persons shall, provided others 
are waiting to play, hold a table no 
longer than to play three racks of 
fifteen-ball pool; for other games than 
straight pool, or for billiards, the time 
limit shall be one-half hour. 

7. No "rough-housing" in 
form will be allowed in the rooms 

8. Care of tables : No sitting on a 
table will be allowed ; a player is con- 
sidered to be sitting on a table if at 
least one of his feet is not flat on the 
floor. No cigars or cigarettes shall 
be placed on the rails or cushions of 
the tables, and no ashes shall be 
dropped on the covering. Balls shall 
be taken from the pockets after a 
player has finished using them, and in 
case no one else is ready to use the 
table immediately, the balls shall be 
placed on the rack on the wall. 

9. The janitor shall be responsible j 
for the care of the room and tables, j 
for opening and closing the room, and 
shall have authority to enforce these 
rules. 

The Trophy room, for study pur- 
poses, shall be kept perfectly quiet at 
all hours, and no smoking shall be 
allowed therein. 



The College Signal.J Tyc.day, February 8, , 9 ,o. _ 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Allen Bros. 



in the Department of Agricultural Education 

Seminar in Education. . .- — 

In the Division of Agriculture. 

Making, Manufactured Milk ProduUs.. 

In the Department of Chemistry. 

Advanced Analysis. Chemistry of Sugar Making and Kenning. 

In the Division of Horticulture: ^ ^ 

Tl ,e Literature of Hortfc«U«^^ 
auction. Kail (ireenhouse Crops lheoryo. V 



In the Division of Humanities: 



Contractors & Builders. 

Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Department of Language and Literature ImlrnaUsm (double course). Periodical Writ 



*^h*!3&Z2!EXm (German) (dot 



any 



Department of Political Science- ___._.,. Th History of Ideals. 

Hygiene. Elementary Gymnastics, Graded Gymnastics. Heavy Gymanasfc . 
Advanced Gymnastics. - --. c r j„ Ilce . 

SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

G. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

G 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 
Musical Association, 
Stockbridge Club, 
Debaiing Club, 
Dramatic Society, 
M. A. C. Literary Monthly, 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Schermerhorn, Manager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 
H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

H. W. French, President 

B. Ostrolenk, President 
A. H. Sharpe, President 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 

Store. 
G.N.Lew and C.E.Roberts. 



When Fitti ng Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are ^quarter, for 

Blankets, Sheets. Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



CARS 



DEBATING CLUB 

Resolved "That the fraternity sys- 
tem at M. A. C. should be abolished" 
was up before the Debating Club Jan. 
19. The aftirmative was upheld by 
Roberts '12 and Godwin * 13 and the 
negative by Folsom '10 and Bailey 
MO. The negative won. The ques- 
tion, which was of vital interest to 
everyone, was freely discussed after 
the debate. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Leave AOQIE COLLEQE lor HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
LEQE at 7 and 37 mlm. past eacti 

HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 

MHEBT I SUKDUUH) ST. HI. CO. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 
Money to continue your College 
Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form of Security. 
Come ar ound and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irvini G. Davis, Jgent, 12 Jiorth 



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MANUFACTURERS OF 

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Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



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The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 

About It. 
Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Daily **• Sunday $2. Weekly «1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 



PL. XX. 

<f[.A.C. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 15, 1910- 



No. 17 



DEFEATS AMHERST WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY ^WORCESTER BEATEN -BUY NEW ENGLAND FARMS" 



1 



ast Game Ends in 3 to 1 Victory. M. 
A. C.'s Protest Upheld by Ama- 
teur Hockey Association. 



On Wedndesday last M. A. C. 
defeated the Amherst hockey team 3 
to 1 . In all, three goals were caged 
by our team but Coach Nye of 
Amherst, who refereed the first half 
called one goal illegal. In spite of soft 
ice the game was fast and furious 
throughout. 

The first goal was caged by Cranshaw 
of Amherst in the latter part of the first 
half. It was the result of a long low 
drive which slipped by Ackerman. 
Shortly after Captain Brandt caged the 
puck from a fine pass from Peckham. 
The goal umpire signaled a goal, but 
Cornell of Amherst claimed that it 
was illegal, because the puck, in pass- 
ing from Peckham to Brandt 
had passed through the cage before 
the goal was shot. Coach Nye 
left the decision with the goal umpire 
who retracted his first decision and 
declared the goal illegal, M. A. C. 
protested, and after much discussion 
resumed the game until the matter 
could be locked up. Investigation :n 
the rule book showed that if the puck 
came through the cage from in front, 
it was a goal. There was no clause 
stipulating that the pass from behind 
the goal was unlawful. Furthermore 
the rules say that the goal umpire shall 
have no jurisdiction over the awarding 
of a goal. Therefore it is evident that 
Coach Nye had no right to allow the 
umpire to change his decision, and 
further that he wis unjustified in his 
decision, because the rules do not 

* * 

declare the goal illegal. However, 
Nye refused to allow the goal. 

In the second half Dr. Reynolds 
acted as referee. Previous to the 
game, it had been agreed by Corey 
and Brandt that Nye and Reynolds 
should referee one half each. The 
Amherst Student and certain reports 
appearing in the newspapers would have 
you believe that Coach Nye was pro- 
tested by M. A. C. as referee. This 
is untrue. 



Dr. Benjamin A. Trueblood of Boston 

Speaks on "War a Thing 

of the Past." 

"War— a Thing of the Past" was 
the rather prophetic subject of Dr. 
Benjamin A. Trueblood's address at 
Wednesday's assembly exercises. 
Dr. Trueblood, who is secretary of the 
American Peace society, pointed out 
the apparent mockery of this subject 
in view of the fact that the standing 
armies and expenditures for military 
purposes are today greater than 
ever before. "There are still 
armaments; there are still 'wars and 
rumors of warr,' but waf as an actual 
thing is practically over." 

Dr. Trueblood gave five reasons In 
support of this assertion. ''My first 
reason is that the world is now practi- 
cally a unit. Modern systems of com- 
munication bring distant countries in 
contact with one another, and produce 
educational, social and commercial 
unity. And when men see that their 
interests are common, they are too 
sensible to fight. Another reason for 
my believing war is over is the rapid 



M. A. C. Takes Relay from Technology Advice of Chief Chemist Wiley at Bos- 



at B. A. A. Meet in Fast Time. 

By magnificent running the M. A. 
C. relay team defeated that of the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, at 
last Saturday's B. A. A. meet, in the 
remarkable time of 3 min. 1 1 4-5 sec. 
This is a new record for the two com- 
peting colleges. Harvard and Cornel, 
in their relay race were the only col- 
leges to beat our time last Saturday 
niglit. The Massachusetts team con- 
sisted of Captain Dickinson, Roberts, 
Cloues and Dudley, while W. P. I. 
was represented by Slocomo, B. Hal- 
ligan, M. Halligan and Captain 
Kennedy. 

M. A. C. won the toss and took the 
pole. Captain Dickinson, who started 
for us, got the jump on Slocomb of 
W. P. I. and after the second bank 
on the first lap around, was never 
troubled. At the tag he had a lead of 
six yards on Slocomb. Roberts, with 
this lead, ran away from B. Halligan 
and when he finished gave Cloues 
about 15 yards. M. Halligan made a 
frame but fruitless effort to close up on 



(■ten • ifWiiatiOP Cloues but the latter was too strong 

and gave Dudley a lead of about 20 
yards. Dudley's opponent, Kennedy, 
captain and crack quarter-miler, gave 
him a hot race for two laps and closed 
up several yards of the gap between 
them. Dudley proved to have better 
staying qualities, however, and suc- 
ceeded in making up the distance he 
had dropped. He finished fully 20 
yards ahead of the Worcester man. 
Time 3 min. 1 1 4-5 sec. Each man 
on the winning team averaged about 
47 9-10 sec. 

All our men finished in excellent 
condition. Tne team made the tags 
in splendid style, and were compli- 
mented on the smoothness with which 
tney took the banks. No team during 
the meet excelled them in this latter 
particular. Our time was the third 
best ot the meet for this event and 



of the peace movement. From 
small beginnings it has grown to enor- 
mous proportions, and not a single 
week passes but new peace societies 
are formed. 

"A third reason for my belief is that 
arbitration is already an established 
means of settling international dis 
putes. It is no longer experimental. 
A permanent international court of 
arbitration meets at The Hague, and 
by unanimous vote its meetings have 
been made periodic. Already hun- 
dreds of cases have been settled by 
arbitration. Another defense of my 
assertion is that the Hague institution 
has placed governments upon a pacific 
basis. My last reason is that prepara- 
tion for war under present-day scientific 
methods has become so enormously 



[Continued on page 4 ] 



expensive that nations can not bear 

up under the strain much longer, and second best amon 8 tne colle g e ttams 

partial disarmament will follow." At far tha race. In the 600 yard handi- 

this point Dr. Trueblood gave some i cap Barrows finish* 

very interesting and astonishing figures 

as to war taxes. He closed with a 



M. A. v-« — 

In a rather 



• TRINITY GAME general invitation to join the Peace 

society, "before you wake ud some 



slow and unexciting 



morning to find the cause popular and 



game, our hockey team was defeated 

, _ . .. ., „ j c- . tnat through no fault of your own. 

by Trinity on the college pond, Satur- j 5 ' 

day afternoon, February 12, by a score — ^ 

of 1 to 0. The pond was rough, ow- The second College Night will be 

ing partially to the snow, which fell held in Draper Hall, Feb. 18th. Sup- was taken by p p. o'Hara of curse. If you put produce in cold 

throughout the game, which did not per 25c, for those not boarding there £ xeter> Time 4 3-5 sec. storage for the purpose of keeping it 

improve the already poor surface of regularly. Every one should reserve The summary of the 12-lap relays until you can get a higher price, you 

the ice. this night and make it the biggest sup- jn order of x ^ eiT t j mes follows. The are doing an illegitimate thing. On-: 



ton Alumni Dinner. 

So said Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, 
chi-r ot ttie bureau of chemistry at 
Washington to the alumni and guests 
of the Maassachusetts Agricultural 
Colle 

The annual dinner of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Boston Alumni 
Club was held at Young's Hotel in Bos- 
tun Tuesday evening, Feb. 8. Some 
seventy-five graduates and Invited 
guests enjoyed the dinner and the 
chance to renew their college days. 

After dinner the following officers 
were elected: President, Artherton 
Clark, '99, son of former President 
Clark; secretary, H. W. Dana, 99 ; 
measurer, W A. Morse. '82; direc- 
tors, F. G. May, '82 ; Bertram Tupper, 
'05, and H. E. Crane, '92. After the 
business meeting, the toastmaster, F. 
W. Davis, '89, introduced the speaker 
of the evening, Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, 
chief of the bureau of chemistry at 
Washington. His words were for the 
promising future of New England ag- 
riculture. " Buy New England farms, 
if you want to make money. The 
tide has turned, and the men of the 
West are coming East. The price of 
land is rising rapialy. This is where 
the work of the Experiment Station Is 
showing itselt. Men find that they 
can grind up the old granite works and 
from them get the fertilizers that wnl 
make two blades of grain grow where 
one grew before. "The land must be 
made more productive. In many mat- 
ters of agricultural science, America 
leads the world, but in actual tilling of 
the soil, to get the most out of It, thir> 
country doesn't hold a candle to some 
European countries. In wheat-grow- 
ing, the average yield here Is 13 
oushels to an acre, against Ireland's 
25 and France 30. " 

Dr. Wiiey spoke also of the Ameri- 
can people's tendency in buying things 
oy the package rather than by actual 
weight or measure. With wheat at 
75 cents a bushel, you pay ten cents 
for a loaf of bread weigeing one pound. 
Wneat goes up to 95 cents a bushel, 
you pay ten cents for a loaf of bread, 
but there is much less than one pound 
of it. Just the same with everything 
else. The people are being defrauded 
Nielson with a handicap of seven feet j because of their impatient willingness 

was tied for second in his heat of the ; to purchase everything by parcel and 

40 yards dash. The handicap limit j package. 

was 9 feet. The final in this event Cold storage is both a good and a 



1 Cowles ran in the fastest heat of the 
race but failed to qualify. Both our 
men had 22 yard handicaps; the limit 
was the 30 yards. Waltner of the N. 
Y. A. C. won the final in this event. 



The playing was very even through- per yet. There will be speakers rep- wjnner i; 

resenting faculty and students. 



Continued on page 8.] 



I Continued on pege 8] 



year is the limit of time that the pro- 

[ Continued on page 5] 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 15, 19 10. 



THE COLLEGE SI GNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910 
HENRY A. BROOKS, 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM, 1910, 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911. 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, 
FRANK A. PROUTY. 1911 



Editor-in-Chief. 
College Notes. 
Athletic Notes. 
Alumni Notes. 
Department Notes. 
College Notes. 



News Editor of this Issue 
HERBERT W. BLANEY, Ml. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-1 S p.m. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday. 6-30 to 7-30 r. u. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 1 a. m . and 6-30 to 

7 p.m. 
Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 m. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1, Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farm ham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Pest Office. 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, FEB. 8. No. 16 



There is yet chance to make 
arrangements for the Junior Prom, 
the 25th. Help make this a 
"howling" success. Invitations 
may be had from A. P. Bursley 

IQII. 



Again the past week we have shown 
our rival neighbors that we meet them 
on common ground in all branches of 
athletics. All that we desire is the 
renewal of relations on the gridiron. 



In the hockey game last Saturday 
was the chance to see that harm can 
arise from the present system of grant- 
ing players their M. In that game 
there were two changes made for the 
express purpose of giving the players 
who went in a chance to earn their 
letter, It being their fifth game. These 
men, no doubt, earned their letter this 
year, but why lose a game like the one 
last Saturday just for a chance to give 
it to them? Wouldn't it be better to 
have the letter granted by the Athletic 
Board, say, than ruin our chances in a 
game to give men their letter? 



What can be done to lessen, if not 
to blot out cribbing? After reviewing 
the recent series of final examinations, 
two things seem apparent which, If 
rectified, would help matters. One 
Is, that the finals carry too much 
weight in reference to the rest of the 
course. Why should a man who has 
done fair work all the semester, passed 
monthly tests, for the most part, be 
conditioned because he fails to get 
above 50 or 55^t In the final examina- 
tion? This final might contain one- 
half catch questions, or if not, the stu- 
dent fears as much. The other fact 
is that our instructors are apt to be too 
lenient In «very-day work. If students 



were better drilled day by day, they 
would not need to crib in a final exam. 
If these two facts would not settle 
cribbing, they at least would go far to 
prevent the necessity for cribbing. 
Better easier finals than dishonor. 



The Signal's attention has been 
called to the condition of the athletic 
finances. About $1400 is out in 
taxes, and quite a part of this was 
relied upon to run the present seasons 
of track and hockey. Baseball must 
come out of this also, but as it is 
understood that no season shall com- 
mence until previous ones have been 
squared up, baseball will not com- 
mence until the present seasons are 
paid for. Hockey and track have 
reached the limit of the present col- 
lected funds and these season will have 
to be suspended unless more money is 
forthcoming. One-half of the unpaid 
taxes are out in the freshman class 
and as the entering class was allowed 
the privilege of voting for this tax, 
before it was levied upon them, it cer- 
tainly seems as though they should 
stand behind their vote. But other 
classes owe considerable amounts and 
as this matter has reached a critical 
stage, every effort should be made to 
pay up the remainder of the tax. 

Additional expense was borne this 
year in clearing up past debts and 
extending the appropriations for all 
branches of athletics, but if this year's 
assessment comes in, a compulsory 
tax of six or seven dollars will be 
sufficient the coming year. It con- 
cerns every true M. A. C. man that 
this condition of affairs be rectified 
and so put every muscle to the wheel 
and bear your part of the burden. 
Attention Is called to a faculty sub- 
scription list which is being well sup- 
ported. This subscription is open to 
all interested. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 15, 1910. 



Feb. 
Feb. 



Feb. 
Feb. 



Feb, 



Feb, 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

15 — 8-15 p. m., Glee club 
rehearsal. 

16 — 1-15 p. m., Assembly, Prof. 
John S. Bassett of North- 
ampton. 

6-45 p. m., Debating club, 
Agricultural recitation room. 
Pomology lecture by W. H. 
Blodget of Worcester on "The 
Commission Man's side of the 
Fruit Business." 
7-00 p. m., Senior play 
rehearsal. 

17 — 7-00 p. m., Senior play 
rehearsal. 

18 — 6-00 p. m., College night, 
Draper hall, everyone invited. 
8-00 p. m., Senior play 
rehearsal. 

19 — 6-30 p. m., Social Union 
entertainment at Chapel, Pearle 
Aikin-Smith. 

20—5-00 p. m., Vespers in 
Chapel, Rev. Charles S. Mac- 
Farland of South Norwalk, 
Conn. 




With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4.00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 

Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 



REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 



•JAMES F. PAGE. 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



DEUEL'S 
DRUG 



Gillette Safety Razors 

Gillette Blades 

Gem Junior Safety Razors, $1.00 

Ever Ready Safety Razors 

Blades 

Colgate's Rapid Shave Powder 

Colgate's Talcum Powder 

Tooth Powders and Tooth Pastes 



Deuel's Dim Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT & SHOE 
REPAIRING 

AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 

R. LEVI N E 

11 1-3 Amity St. Amherst. 



THURBER'S 



Nkxt-To-Post-offick 



Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



CAP •& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



STATIONERY 



ASK 
YOUR STATIONER FOR 




Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper, 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

57-63 FRANKLIN STREET, 
BOSTON. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The Senior play will be presented in 
the Town Hall, Thursday evening, Feb. 
12 ; tickets are now on sale by mem- 
bers of the cast. 

During the past week the Senior 
and Junior classes have held meetings 
and elected their class officers for the 
present semester. 

The Junior officers are : Presi- 
dent, C. A. Smith, vice-president. 
E. L. Winn; secretary and treasurer, 
L. M. Johnson; historian, B. Ostrol- 
enk; class captain. R. W. Piper; 
sergeant-at-arms, W. F. Henry. 

The Social Union entertainment last 
Saturday evening was given by Mr. F. 
B. McKay of the English Department 
and Mr. Ashley. Mr. McKay outdid 
himself in the presentation of several 
very entertaining and humorous read- 
ings while Mr. Ashley rendered several 
splendid selections on the piano. 

The result of the senior election is 
as follows : President, W. R. Clarke ; 
vice-president, W. E. Leonard ; sec- 
retary and treasurer. H. T. Cowles ; 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



Folsom 'io 



Nickless 'io 



Aggie 



Store 




Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
# Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



Clapp '12 



Beers ' 1 2 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

"DON'T KICK" if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Oropper. 
Get the 



Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill It." 

Guaranteed to give satisfac- 
tion. 

SOLD BY 

E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



class captain, C. A. Oertel; sergeant- 
at-arms, H. W. French. A com- 
mittee was chosen to report on men 
for commencement and class day 
speakers. 

THE SENIOR PLAY 

This year the senior class again 

takes dramatics Into their hands and 

will present a comedy entitled "One 

of the Eight" In the town hall next 

week Thursday, the evening before 

the Junior Prom. The play will be 

presented in Montague, Monday even- 
ing, Feb. 21st. The action and story 

of the play turns upon the annual 

boatrace between two rival colleges. 

It is a lively, humorous representation 

of college life and spirit, bringing in 

some of the seriousness and faults of 

some colleges. 
The scenes are laid at Henry 

Brook's country house and at the 

college. 
The seniors are very fortunate in 

having men in the class who fit the 

characters. L. S. McLaine, or Mac, 

with his English characteristics, imper- 
sonates Lord Chillingworth as no one 

else could, and G. N. Vinton takes 

off a country lass to perfection. 

Henry Brooks and his handsome 

appearance, Louis Brandt with his 

championship figure, and Walter 

Clarke with his manly face are doing 

excellent work with the leading parts 

as typical college athletes. H. T. 

Cowles with his swinging, "steamboat" 

stride, is a backwoods country farmer 

and the motherly A. R. Rockwood is 

his wife. W. R. Cloues, with his 

great ambitions is working down his 

Irish brogue very nicely, and makes a 

good valet. Bill Johnson and his 

bold temperament and general appear- 
ance takes on as a hypnotist. He is 1 

the villain. E. H, Turner with all his 

good advice and knowing "bean" 

makes an excellent college professor 

who butts into student affairs. Ross 

Annis is a sad, studious, conscientious 

freshman who is green all over, and 

becomes intoxicated in his sudden 

hilariousness at the race. S. W. i 

Mendum and his rosy cheeks takes 

the part of a young lady interested in 

Henry, and Lady Hayward is a typical 
college widow. 0. V. T. Urban is 
an associate villain with W. C. 
Johnson. 

"One of the Eight" is a play full of 
fun, yet It brings out some of the 
serious aspects of college life. It is a Qne block from Union Station . Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 
college play by college men. F. L. and State capitol# Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

Thomas is the stage manager and is direct motor route from New York tQ fioston Gafage 

doing much toward its successful pre- Banquets a specialty> Waiter & Garde 

sentation. Rehearsals are being held 
nearly every day and Prof. F. B. 
McKay is ironing the cast right down 
solid by putting on a few finishing 
touches. 

Tickets are 50, 35 and 25 cents 
and may be obtained from R. A. Wal- 
dron, or any of the cast. All seats 
are reserved. If good seats are 
wanted early purchase is necessary as 
they have already begun to sell fast. 



"Who Bays New England is barren?" 

1 Z2\ Bush. Shelled Corn from One Acre 
611 Bush. Potatoes from One Acre 

ON STOCKBRIDGE 

ALONE 

A BROCK 1 ' IN shoe < utter, Mr. A. \V. Mutler, who carries on a small milk (arm 

with the aid of two sons, nlltdNOItun with the Stockbridga Special Manure 

..1 11 IJJ 1 j bushels ..1 shelled corn, and won hrst prize in our 1000 contest. In this 

contest each 01 six contestants raited over 100 bushels pei acre, eiulit over 90 bushels, 

thirteen over So bushels, and sixteen over 70 bushels shelled corn to the acre. Who says 

New England is barren ? 



A 



PARMER at Hope, Maine, not in Aroostook County, Mr. O. H. Flail, secured a 

yield of 'hi bushels (ireen .Mountain Potatoes from cine acre on Stockbridga 
Man ure for I 'otatoes exclusively. Thirty contestants raJsed crops ranging from iti> i-a 
bushels per acre in various parti of New England. Who says New England is barren t 

HOW THEY DID IT 



Is told in a pamphlet, which also contains conditions of 0111 iojo Com tad Potato prize 
Contests. On coin we offer *i,ooo in prizes, < 500 for quantity, #500 for quality ot ( orn, 
and $200 on potatoes. Send fur it do-day. Why not compete? Whether you win or 
not, you aie using the Ix-st fertilizers in the market, and are sure of good crops under 
normal weather conditions. The liest is the cheapest in the end 

HT" 7/ you have not read Mr. Bowker' s New Book oh Fertility, //<v 

Fertilizers are Made, etc., send your namt I •> 11 .»/>. No advertising in 

the text. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 
43 CHATHAM ST. 



BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum, arid High Streets, 



Hartford, Coiir|. 



£&rp{ivter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, February 15, 1910- 



WHAT ABOUT 

THAT FALL SUIT 

If you have not selected it yet, let me show samples of fine 
Worsted Suiting, Trouserings, and Rain Cloth. 

Worsted Silk mix, 18 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - $12.50 

Worsted Fancy, 17 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - J Il-5 ° 

Worsted Silk mix, 15 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - Jio.oo 

Black unfinished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - J9-°° 

Black finished, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - - J9-°° 

Blue, 14 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - - j9-°° 

Blue. 12 oz. suiting, 3 1-2 yds. - ■ • *9°° 

Rain Cloth, - $3-5° P* r >' d - Trouserings, - $3.50 per yard. 
I sell cloth at every college in New England. 



M. A. C. DEFEATS AMHERST 

(Continued from first page] 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

X3T L° cal Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



M. D. GILMAN. C. A. MOFFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main Street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins $octs. 
25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3ct. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 2scts. 

25 " Hroken Hank and Confederate 
Bills $1.00 

8eml for my Monthly Mall Auction Circulars and 
Selling price lint. 




COX SONS 



The second half started off with a 
rush and Peckham succeeded in cag- 
ing a pretty goal making the score 1 to 
1. From then on the puck was kept 
in Amherst's terrritory and but for the 
fine work of Bedford the score would 
have been larger for M. A. C. The 
Amherst team threw discretion to the 
winds and began "mixing it up." As 
a result they were penalized seven 
minutes and M. A. C. five minutes. 
Towards the end of the half Brandt 
again caged the puck after a long 
scrimmage in front of the goal. This 
Is the goal which the Amherst team 
protested. Amherst men say the puck 
did not go within the cage, but the 
goal umpire, who was in the best posi- 
tion to see, Is positive that the puck 
was fairly over the goal line. There 
is absolutely nothing for them to pro- 
test, and it would be absurd to refer the 
matter to the Intercollegiate Hockey 
Association. 

M. A. C, however, entered a pro- 
test with C. Fellowes, of the St. 
Nicholas Rink, N. Y. and the follow- 
ing quotation from his letter makes the 
true score 3 to 1 instead of 2 to 1 . 
"The referee of the game in ques- 
tion, who gave the decision that the 
goal as described to me by you was 
unlawful, is absolutely wrong. The 
goal was perfectly legal. The fact of 
there being a hole in the net has noth- 
ing whatsoever to do with the game; 
that is the fault of the net, not of the 
players, and the fact that the puck 
passed through it before going back 
into the cage has no bearing whatso- 
ever in the matter." 

With but two minutes to play, 
hockey changed to shinny, and M. A. 
C. was perfectly able to cope with 
Amherst's tactics. 

In regard to the "challenge" 
received from Amherst for another 
game, Captain Brandt says that the 
nature of the challenge would make 
both teams professionals and that it 
would be inadvisable to accept it. 
The sentiment which prompted such a 
challenge so soon after defeat is 
evident. 

Concerning the newspaper reports 
that went out we can only say this, 
that they were evidently meant to be 
misleading. That Amherst should 
allow such a thing is very deplorable. 
For Amherst Bedford, Chapin and 
Cranshaw were strong while Peckham, 
Brandt, and Walker excelled for M. 
A. C. 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 
know that their shoes are 

right. 
Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



I 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Mock 
Amherst, Mass. 



jtE. IN. PARISEAU,j« 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist. 
19 WASHINGTON ST., Boston. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



M. A. C 

Ackerman, g. 
Adams, p. 
Walker, c. p. 
Sanctuary, 1. w. 



AMHERST. 

g.. Bedford 

p. Babcock 

c. p., Sibley 

r. w., Cranshaw 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



WARREN ADTO CO., 

15 Maple Street, 
Northampton, - Mass. 



Brewer, Heath, Bentley. r. w. 1. w., Chapin 
Peckham, r. r., (Capt ) Cornell 

Brandt. (Capt) c. c, Washburn 

Score— M. A C. 3, Amherst 1. Goals- 
Brandt 2, Peckham, Cranshaw. Referees 
—Coach Nye of Amherst, Dr. Reynolds, M. 
A. C. Umpires— Sawyer and Storge of 
Amherst, Brewer and Schermerhorn ofM. 
A. C Timer— Carpenter of Harvard. 
Time— 20 and 15-minute halves. 



Autos for Hire and Ex- 
change. 

We have the agency for the 
Ford Cars you hear praised 
so highly. Five passenger 
Touring Car, all complete, 
$950. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 15, 1910. 



" BUY NEW ENGLAND FARMS." 

[Continued from first page.l 



duce should be kept in storage. 

Dr. David Snedden spoke at length 
in advocacy of adding an agricultural 
course in the high schools in farming 
localities. He believed it to be the 
best and the speediest method for mak- 
ing the New England farm profitable. 
Practical work along scientific lines in 
the schools, he said was necessary. 

Dr. James B. Paige, in speaking 
for the college, prophesied the speedy 
recovery of Dean Mills, and his return 
to his duties at M. A. C. He gave a 
brief review of the college during the 
past year and urged the hearty support 
of the alumni and friends. 

Besides the guests already men- 
tioned, those present included State 
Senator Walter B. Mellen, chairman 
of senate committee on agriculture; 
Representative Charles M. Gardner, 
chairman of the same committee in 
the house ; J. Lewis Ellsworth, secre- 
tary of the state board of agriculture ; 
Representative George H. Ellis, M. 
F. Dickinson, trustee, and Represen- 
tative Fred Smith of Hadley. 

Those present not already mentioned 
follow ; 

71_W. H. Bowker, L. B. Cros- 
well, J. F. Fisher. 

72— Charles O. Flagg. 

'75 — J. M. Winchester, Madison 
Bunker. 

76— C. W. McConnell. 

77— Atherton Clark. 

'79— H. E. B. Waldron. 

'80— B. P. Richardson. 

'81— A.D.Perry, Dr.Austin Peters. 

'82— W. A. Morse, F. G. May. 
Dr. J. B. Paige. 

'83— Charles H. Preston, S. M. 
Holman, H. J. Wheeler. 

'87 — J. J. Shanghnessy. C. L. 
Marshall, W. H. Caldwell, F. H. Fow- 
ler, C. S. Howe, J. M. Marsh. 

'88— Thomas Rice, G. W. Cutler. 

'89 — F. W. Davis, R. P. Sellew, 
D. L. Hubbard, E. L. Mills, B*L. 
Hartwell, J. R. Blair. 

'90— F. L. Taylor. 

'91 — N. N. Legate. 

'92— E. J. Clark, C. M. Hubbard. 
H. E. Crane, Eliot Rogers, F. G. 
Balders, G. B. Willard. 

'94— L. Man'ey, J. E. Gifford. 

'95— D. C. Potter, G. F. Burgess, 
H. L. Frost. 

'97_p. H. Smith. 

•99_H. W. Dana, B. N. Smith, 
A. A. Boutelle. 

'00— R. D. Gilbert. 

'02 — J. H. Carpenter, L. A. Cook, 
J. O. Hall. 

'03 — G. D. Jones. 

'04— S. R. Parker. 

'05 — A. T. Swain, B. Tupper. 

'06— G. W. Sleeper. 

'07 — Clinton King. 

'08— H. C. Chase, S. J. Wright, 
C. Dolan. 

'09— A. W. Hubbard, H. L.White, 
J. B. Thompson. 

'10— H. A. Brooks. 



1912—5 1913—1 



Freshmen Defeated in First Sophomore 

-Freshman Hockey Game. Playing 

Slow on Account of Poor Ice. 

The Sophomores defeated the Fresh- 
men in a hard fought hockey game last 
Friday by a score of 5 to I. The 
game was played on our own rink but 
the poor condition of it made good 
playing almost impossible. The Sopho- 
mores outplayed the Freshmen in every 
way, and what little team work was 
displayed, was done by them. The 
game lacked none of the roughness 
and excitement of the Sophomore- 
Freshmen contests. 

The Freshmen started off the game 
with a rush, and it looked for a minute 
or two as if they would score. But 
the Sophomores came back strong and 
carried the puck intc the Freshman 
territory where they kept it during most 
of the half. The first score was made 
by Peckham who succeeded in pushing 
the puck over the goal line during a 
mix-up in front of the goal. The 
score aroused the Freshmen to greater 
efforts, which finally resulted in a goal 
for them by Heath. This was followed 
after a minute of fast play, by another 
point for the Sophomores. Two more 
goals, one by Sanctuary and the other 
by Peckham, furnished the scoring in 
the first half. 

The second half was a repetition of 
the first, except that there was less 
scoring. The only goal came when 
Walker scored for 1912, after carrying 
the puck the length of the rink. 

Peckham and Sanctuary excelled 
for the Sophomores, while Brewer and 
Larsen showed up well on the Fresh- 
men team. Ellis, of the latter team, 
gave an example of good work at goal, 
and with proper training should be 
heard from later. 



1912. 






1913. 


Ackerman, 




%•• 


Ellis 


Hickey, 




P- 


Moor 


Walker. 


c 


p.. 


Whitney 


Puffer. Reed. 


r. 


w.. 


Little. Gaskel). 
Sheehan 


Sanctuary, 


1. 


w.. 


Bradley, Larsen 


Merrill. Fowler. 




c , 


Heath (Capt.) 


Peckham. (Capt ) 




r.. 


Brewer 


Score. 1912. 


5 




1913. 1. 



Goals. Peckham 3, Sanctuary, Walker, 
and Heath. Referee. Brandt '10. Umpire. 
Morse Ml and Wood '12. Timer. Summers 
'07. Time. 20 minute halves. 



DEBATING CLUB 

The Debating club is trying to 
arrange a debate with Rhode Island 
State College, this making two Inter- 
collegiate debates for the year. The 
men for the teams are to be picked 
partly from the classes and partly from 
the club. As the preliminaries come 
in about three weeks, men who intend 
to take part should get busy. Medals 
are also offered for the best debaters. 
Join the Debating club and help make 
these debates a success. 

Last Wednesday evening, the ques- 
tion before the club was: Resolved 
that military tactics should be taught 
in cur public schools. French '13 
upheld the affirmative alone, due to the 
absence of his colleague. His oppo- 
nents were Terry '12 and Ostrolenk 
'1 1 and the judges awarded them the 
decision. The sentiment of the club 
however, was in favor teaching military 
tactics. 



T. L^. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 



HIGH CLASS 



. . . TAILOR . . . 

Foreign and domestic woolens always on hand. These 
goods are of the most exclusive patterns, and my work is 
guaranteed to be tailored in the latest style and workmanship. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing and Pressing 

A Specialty. 

Full Dress Suits to Rent. The only plate in town. 

A nice line of MEN'S FURNISHINGS. The famous 
Eagle Shirt, the E. & \V. (Redman's Brand) Collars and 
Dress Shirts. Special Dancing Gloves and Dress Ties. 
Nice new line of Necktie Pins, Cuff Buttons and Studs. Bos- 
ton Garters, Suspenders, &c. 



LABROVITZ 



1 1 Amity St. 



Phone 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY RROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET A LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 15, 1910. 




.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•..•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••••••••••••'•••"•'•'•'•' 

GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Keiser Cravats, 

,^£\ English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



m 



...•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••••••••••••••••'•••••■•••'••'•'•■•'•'••'••'•'•'•'•'•'• 



TWO NEW FRATERNITIES 

Two new fraternities have been 
recognised by the committee on stu- 
dent activities, Sigma Tau Delta and 
Beta Kappa Phi. The charter mem- 
bers are as follows : Sigma Tau Delta ; 
of the Sophomores— A. W. Dodge, 
C. W. Ells, H. C. Hutchings, D. C. 
Maxon, A. N. Raymond; of the 
Freshmen— D. S. Caldwell, E. H. 
Cooper, B. A. Harris, H. T. Hatch, 
L. B. Turner. Beta Kappa Phi ; 
honorary member — F. B. McKay ; of 
the Juniors— E. N. Davis, A. R. 
Jenks, A. T. Conant ; of the 
Sophomores— C. L. Beals, W. A. 
Fisherdick, H. A. Noyes, E. S. Wil- 
bur; of the Freshmen— W. C. For- 
bush, F. E. Marsh, C. M. Streeter. 
This makes eight fraternities of recog- 
nized standing in the college. The 
field is now fairly well covered. Since 
now every man can find his standing 
in a fraternity, the unified spirit 
between fraternities should develope. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE OLD CORP DRUB STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C. *82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Mock, Amhkrst, Mass. 
Cut flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Phoenix Row 



Telephone 59 — 4. 



Holland's Block, 

STEAM FITTING, 
GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 

A Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



VESPER SERVICES 

The Rev. Charles F. Carter of 
Lexington was the speaker at the ves- 
per services last Sunday. He took as 
his text Psalms 20, verse 5: "We 
will rejoice in thy salvation, and in the 
name of our God we will set up our 
banners." Dr. Carter first recalled 
the numerous warriors that had fought 
under God's banner— the Maccabees, 
the Crusaders and Joan of Arc. 

"Fighters on countless battle-fields 
have been nerved to great deeds by 
religious zeal. The warrior's will may 
be strong, but to do really great things 
he must be reinforced by divine spirit. 
Life is a battle-field in which we must 
overcome opposing forces, some in the 
shape of temptations. Temptations 
which would linger and make life one 
long siege are to be conquered by one 
splendid, resolute attack, instead of 
being allowed to harass for a life-time. 
We should not slink away from our 
temptations, but should with sturdy 

ED niPlflNCnN fl n Q i zeal serve notice upon them and they, 
. b. uiUMnaun u. u.o. !lnsteadi will slink *. Man should 

I>KTVTAIv ROOMS | not forever be fighting the same temp- 
tations ; let him fight new battles with 
encouragement of victories won. 

Life is not a negative thing, it is 
positive; things must be met. 



Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours; 

eto iae a.ivi . i.aoto«i*.M. 



Ether and Nitrous 
stered when desired 



Oxide Gas admin- 



BEST FARM IN AMHERST 

Excellent 2-story house, bath room, 
hot and cold water; best farm in this 
section, running spring water; 40 acres 
tillage, 20 pasture, some wood and tim- 
ber; plenty of fruit and many other good 
features. 56000 in repairs has been 
expended on the place during the last 
18 months. Price now for whole prop- 
erty only $9000. 

W. R. BROWN 

AMHERST. MASS. 



us set up our banner where we are 
loyal to our growing selves. Let our 
ideals lie in the future. Don't handi- 
cap yourself by deeds that will stand in 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

LIBRARY. 

Among the recent additions to the 
library may be mentioned: 
Nelson— "Loose Leaf Encyclopedia." 

12 vols. 
Century Magazine, 1903—1909 inc. 
Harper's Magazine, 1903—1909 inc. 
Burkett— " Farmer's Veterinarian. " 
Sands— "American Poultry Culture." 
Spargo — "Common Sense on the Milk 

Question." 
Shaw— "Management and Feeding of 

Cattle." 
Parson— "Landscape Gardener." 
Lysinan— "Bacteria in Relation to 

Country life." 
Theobald— "Insect pests of fruit." 

agriculture. 

Prof. J. A. Foord spoke Feb. 19th 
before the Rhofo Island state board 
of agriculture. His subject was "The 
Growing of Corn." 

Jan. 26th Prof. J. A. Foord spoke 
before the Farmers' Institute at North 
Bilerica. "The New England Corn 
Show and How to Prepare for it" was 
his morning and "Soil Fertility and 
Commercial Fertilizers" was his after- 
noon subject. 

S. B. Haskell spoke before the 
Hardwick Grange Jan. 28th and 31st. 
E. H. Forristall spoke at Sturbridge 
Feb. 3rd before the Worcester South 
Agricultural Society, on the subject of 
"Producing Pork for Market." 

FLORICULTURE. 

Feb. 8th Peter Fisher, the promin- 
ent carnation breeder, spoke to the 
floriculture classes on "Carnation 
Growing." 

POMOLOGY. 

The special lectures on fruit growing 
have been giving those who attend the 
meetings some very interesting things 
to think about. Chas. E. Lyman of 
Middlefield. Conn. (M. A. C. 1878), 
who spoke last Monday evening cer- 
tainly proved that there is money in 
fruit growing in New England. When 
we say that his 1909 peach crop 
brought him $41,000, it certainly 
looks as though the west coast is not 
making all the money. 

Other special lectures have been 

arranged as follows : — 

Wednesday, Feb. 16— W. H. Blodget 

of Worcester, "The Commission 

Man's Side of the Fruit Business." 

Feb. 23 — J. H. Hale is expected. 

March 2— H. L. Frost of Arlington on 

"Spraying. 



J. H. TROTT 



the way of being the man you may 

sometime wish to be. A period of j March 9— Wilfrid Wheeler of Concord 

moral reconstruction is shown by keen on «<Bush Fruits as Money Crops " 



sense of justice and by manhood s 
tradition of service and brotherhood. 
He who would be an effective soldier 
in life must have divine help and be 



ALUMNI NEWS 
There is yet chance to make 



in lite mubi n<»»c vii»...~ —~t •— — ~ j -- 

Pllimber, Steam & GaS Fitter, imbued with good-will and love for all. arrangements for the Junior Prom, 

FlpalPr in StnVPS antl RanePS Go with the spirit that your life shall the25th . Help make this a "howl- 

ueaier in Moves ana nanges. be a challenge and not a truce, and invitations may be 

— — that it shall tell for ?ll that is true and 1U & / , * 

loyal Like the color-bearer replying had from A. P. Bursley 191 1. 

to his chief : 'I will come back victo- Tne annua i meeting and banquet of 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



victo- 
rious or tell God the reason why,' let the Connecticut Va u ey Alumni Asso- 
us report toGod tte reaam and pur- | ^.^ ^ be he , d ^ ^ Ro ^ 

at 7 p. m., 



pose of our lives 
! field of victory.' 



Then will life be a 



• Heublein, Hartford. Conn. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 15, 191 o. 



on Friday, Feb. 18, 1910- All 
alumni and former students are cor- 
dially invited to attend. Dinner tick- 
ets, $2.50. 

W. B. Hatch. Secretary. 

Ex-'87.— Clinton G. Chapin is 
serving his second year as alderman 
of Chicopee. 

Ex- '87.— Joseph. F. Daniels has 
recently resigned as librarian of the 
Colorado State Agricultural college 
and is now with the Carlisle News 
Company, 217 16:h St., Majestic 
Building, Denver, Colo. 

'94. _G. E. Smith, for the past 
three years a farm superintendent near 
Belfast, Me., has been obliged to take 
an extended vacation because of poor 
health. He has spent some time at 
Sheffield, his old home. 

'95. — H. D. Hemenway, secretary 
of the People's Institute (formerly 
Home Culture Clubs) of Northampton, 
gave an illustrated lecture at the joint 
meeting of the State Farmer's Insiitute 
and Ohio State Board of Agriculture at 
Columbus, Jan. 14. After the lec- 
ture he was asked to remain a weeK 
to do institute work. At the Grace 
Church, Holyoke, on the evenings of 
Jan. 30 and 31, he gave addresses on 
"The Gospel of the Gardens" and 
'•Our Common Trees and How to 
Know Them," each illustrated by 
stereoptican. 

'99.— D. A. Beaman, Rio Pedros, 
P. R., has recently added a canning 
establishment to his extensive pine- 
apple plantation. 

'99.— B. H. Smith addressed the 
winter meeting of the New Hampshire 
State Board of Agriculture at Exeter, 
N. H., Jan. 13, on "National Food 
Inspection." 

'00.— A. A. Harmon, D. V. S., at 
Phoenix, Ariz., for the winter, in 
charge of the Arizona Sheep Inspection. 

'00. — The engagement of Dr. E. 
T. Hull to Miss Ethel Smith of New 
York City has been announced. 

'03.— J. G. Cook has bought the 
Tuttle farm in East Hadley. His work 
with the Northampton State Hospital 
will terminate April 1. 

Ex-'04.— Louis W. Hill. 2400 
North Ave., Bridgeport, Conn., in 
coal business with his father. 

Ex- '04. — James A. Pease, Real 
Estate, 310 Meig's Building, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

'07.— W. E. Dickinson sailed Jan. 
14th from San Francisco for Honolulu, 
where he has accepted a position as 
chemist in Pepeekeo sugar plantation 
in Hawaii. 

'09. — D. J. Caffrey, Entomologist 
with Dr. Britton, Connecticut Experi- 
ment Station, New Haven, Conn. 

'09.— H. P. Crosby, Teacher, 
Newbury, Vt. 

'09.— H. W. Turner, Third Field 
Assistant on sugar plantation, Ensan- 
ede de Mora, Cuba. 

F. C. Warnor, Chriitobel, Canal 
Zone, Panama. 




THE H. L FROST & BARRETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 



STAMFORD, CONN. 



THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 



BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 



SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



At the Great Fruit Show held ;it Boston, Mass., 
October 18-24, ! 90Q, fruit grown on Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, (Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
hirst Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Pour 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by Mr. 

George .\. Drew, of Connecticut, M. A, C Class 

of 1897. (Our pamphlet " Up To Date Fruit Grow- 
ing* 1 is sent free if you mention The Colitgt Sign*/.) 



The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

We also distribute from Boston, Mass., Belfast, Me., Baltimore, 
Md., Wilmington, N.C., Savannah, (.a., and Charleston, S.C. 




a TO9K> 






ll CIGAiSHT'TiSilS 



J* 20 for 15 cis. 




Smoke. Reminiscences. Clever stories. 
All good fellows. Cigarettes in order. 
^v Of course they're Fatimas. 

The mild flavor climaxes the climax. 
The rare blend of Turkish tobacco 
just suits. The mellowing process 
has made it perfection. 

The package is economical and you 
get ten extra cigarettes. 

f HE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 




8 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 15, 191* 



M. A. C— TRINITY GAME 

[Continued from first page.] 



out the game, the balance of the 
offensive work being with our men, If 
anywhere, but our boys lacked the life 
and teamwork at the critical moments. 
The rough ice made fast skating Im- 
possible and carrying the puck for any 
considerable distance was hard work. 
The visiting team showed more team 
work than their opponents, but were 
not as fast, individually. The only 
score of the game was made at close 
range from a mixup, and Ackerman 
was unable to connect with it. 

In the second half, Heath replaced 
Brewer and a few minutes later was 
himself replaced by Bentley. Captain 
Brandt, Peckham and Adams were 
the individual stars for the home team, 
while Rankin of the visitors made him- 
self dangerous by his sudden dashes up 
the rink. 
The lineup: 

M. A. C. TRINITY. 

Ackerman, g. g., Brainerd 

Adams, p. p., Eaton 

Walker, c. p., c. p., Rankin 

Brewer, Heath, Bentley, r. w. 

r. w., Morris 
Sanctuary, 1. w. 1. w., Haight 

Brandt, c. c, Breed 

Peckham, r. r., Burgawin 

Score, Trinity 1, made by Haight. 
Referee, Schermerhorn ; Umpires, 
Regan and Summers. Timer, Chap- 
man. Time, 15 m. halves. 

WORCESTER BEATEN 

fContlnued from first page.] 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Below is a list of courses offered by the College for the first time in 
1909- 1910. Several other courses have been greatly amplified and extended. 
In the Department of Agricultural Education: 

Seminar in Education. 

In the Division of Agriculture: 

Making, Manufactured Milk Products. 

In the Department of Chemistry: 

Advanced Analysis, Chemistry of Sugar Making and Kefining. 

In the Division of Horticulture: 

The Literature of Horticulture, Practical Pomology (special), Greenhouse Design and Con- 
struction! ^ifureennouseCr'ops, Theory of Landscape Art. Ornamental Gardenmg. 

In the Division of Humanities: 

Department of Language and Literature— u ,;„j;.,i Wr.t 

mmmimmmm 

K&s^^^ S3 .nterpretat.on of Music. 

Department of Political Science— 

Economic History, The H.story of New England. The History of Ideals. 

In the Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Civil Engineering: 

Analytic Mechanics, Descriptive Geometry. 

In the Department of Physical Education and Hygiene: 

Hygiene. Elementary Gymnastics, Graded Gymnastics, Heavy Gymanastics, Training Course, 
Advanced Gymnastics. 

In the Department of Rural Social Science: 

Elements of Agricultural Economics, Historical and Comparative Agriculture, Specific Pro- 
lans in Agricultural Economics, Seminar (double course). 

The term "doubl e course" indicates that the course is given for both semesters of the year. 

SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 

J. F. Adams, Manager 

C. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 

R. S. Eddy, Manager 

G 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



min 

B. A. A. vs. N. Y. A. C, 3 

Harvard vs. Cornell. 3 

M. A. C. vs. W. P. 1.. 3 

M. I. T. vs. Dartmouth, 3 

Columbia vs. Syracuse, 3 

Harvard '13 vs. Yale '13. 3 

Princeton vs. Pennsylvania, 3 

Bowdoin vs. Tufts, 3 

Brown vs. Amherst, 3 

Holy Cross vs. Boston College, 3 

Univ. Maine vs. Univ. Vermont, 3 

Bates vs. Colby, 3 

Williams vs. Wesleyan, 3 



sec. 

8 3-5 

8 4-5 

11 4-5 

11 4-5 

11 4-5 

12 2-5 
13 

15 

15 2-5 
16 

16 4-5 

17 1-5 
19 3-5 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Debating Club, 

Dramatic Society, 

M. A. C. Literary Monthly, 



R C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



i 



Schermerhorn, Manager 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 

H. W. Blaney, Manager 

F. A. Castle, Manager 

F. T. Haynes, President 

R. H. Allen, President 

L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 

H. W. French, President 

B. Ostrolenk, President 

A. H. Sharpe, President 

F. L. Thomas, Manager 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Ex-'87.— Rev. Dr. Herbert J. 
White, pastor of the First Baptist 
Church, Hartford, Conn., has recently 
been honored by the request of the 
Baptist Missionary Union to go to 
Africa as their special ambassador to 
study the fields on the Congo and In 
the Soudan, but has been obliged to 
decline. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, Pressing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 

No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLEK 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AQQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO. 



FOUND— A railroad ticket on the cam- 
pus. Owner can have same by proving 
property and calling at Treasurer's Office. 

Do you want Security for Borrowing | 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving O. Davis, Agent, 12 North 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Daily**. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



THI! COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



I MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 

53 = 

Amherst, Mast., Tuesday, February 22, 1910. 



No. 18 



JUNIOR PROM FRIDAY, FEB. 25 



COLLEGE NIGHT 



Second of Informal Gatherings of Stu- 
dents and Faculty a Great Success. 
Talks by Dr. H. J. Wheeler, Hon. 
F. A. Hosmer, Hon. C. M. 
Gardiner and Others. 

The second College Night of the 
year was held at Draper Hall, Friday 
evening and a number of students, 
faculty and local alumni listened with 
interest to the various speakers. Presi- 
dent Butterfieid, acting as toastmaster, 
introduced the subject of the talk for 
the evening as " The College Man and 
Service," this to include service to 
the college, to his state and to his 
nation. 

The first speaker was Dr. H. J. 
Wheeler, M. A. C. '83, President of 
the Associate Alumni. He touched 
upon the " College Man's duty to his 
Alma Mater after he graduates." He 
said in part, " A man's duty to Aima 
Mater does not close with graduation. 
A man's ideals while in college decide 
to a large extent his idea of service to 
his country. Get hold of something 
and stick to it. When chance comes 
to help your college, don't turn it down. 
Don't be ashamed of the fact that you 
graduated from the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College for there is now 
no stigma attached the name Agricul- 
tural." 

President Leonard of the College 
Senate was the next speaker. His 
subject was "The College Man's 
Service in College." He said " One 
of the most precious things of college 
life is friendship. A good way to make 
a friend is to do a silent act of kindness. 
Helping the individual helps the col- 
lege also. Cut out the cliques and 
social barriers and get together for the 
good of the college." 

Professor Hurd spoke of the "College 
Man's Service to Agricultural Busi- 
ness." " More is expected" he said, 
"of college men and especially of Ag- 
ricultural college men than any one else. 
We have got to raise agricultural 
standards and then the future of agri 
culture will take care of itself." 

Mr. Jenks pointed out three ways in 
which the college man could be of ser- 
vice to Rural Education. "As patron, 



SPRINGFIELD EVENS UP 



[Continued on pace 4 ] 



After Extending Time Four Periods, 

Springfield Training School Shoots 

Winning Goal. Season Ends. 

After twenty minutes of overtime 
play, our hockey team was defeated 
by the Springfield Training School 
team in Springfield last Saturday 
afternoon, by a score of 3 to 2. The 
game was fast all the way through and 
the teams were very evenly matched, 
though our boys showed a little the 
effect of not having the ice to practise 
on for a week before the game. The 
result of this game evens up the sea- 
son with Springfield, we having de- 
feated her on January 8, by a score 
of 3 to 2 and sne defeating us Satur- 
day by the same score. Saturday's 
game finished up Manager Schermer- 
horn 's schedule. The season has 
been fairly successful, taking into con- 
sideration the fact* that thii la th* 
second year of hockey h-re and that 
the team has had to work against so 
much s-ow, the rink not being availa- 
ble more than one half the time. The 
team has defeated Northampton 
Y. M. C. A., Springfield Training 
School and Amherst, out of six games. 

Saturday's game was a good one 
with which to end up the season, and 
although defeated, our team showed 
some fine playing. Springfield shot 
two goals in the first half, leaving the 
score at the end of the half, 2 to 0. 
With two minutes to play in the last 
half, Sanctuary lifted the puck through 
the opponent's cage and immeaiately 
after the next face-off, with only about 
one-half minute to play. Peckham 
shot th^ goal, which tied the score. 
Time was extended four times before 
Berry of the Springfield team shot the 
winning score for Springfield. The 
time limit ended a few seconds after 
with the score in Springfield favor. 

The lineup : 



LINCOLN AND JEFF. DAVIS FARMERS' WEEK 



M. A. C. 










S. T. S. 


Ackerman, g. 










g.. Salassa 


Adams, p. 










p., Emerson 


Walker, c. p. 










c. p.. Smith 


Peckham, r. 










r., Guillow 


Heath. Bentley. 


1. 


w. 






1. w., Warren 


Sanctuary, r. w. 










r. w.. Best 


Brandt, c. 










c. Berry 


Score. S. T. 


S 


3 


M. 


A 


C. 2. Goals, 


Continued 


on page 


81 



Prof. Bassett's Assembly Talk Draws 

Parallels in the Two Great 

Americans. 

"Lincoln and Jeff Davis," was the 
subject chosen by Professor Bassett at 
the Wednesday Assembly in commem- 
oration of Lincoln Day. In comparing 
the two he said, "They were both 
extraordina-y men; though Davis 
may suffer by comparison with Lincoln 
we must remember that they were 
both great Am-ricans. The two men 
were both born in Kentucky ; one was a 
secessionist, the other a nationalist. 
One moved to Mississippi and became 
a slave holder, the "iher moved to 
Illinois and arrayed himself with the 
opponents of slavery." 

Professor Bassett then briefly 
sketched the rise of the two men to 
national prominence. "Lincoln did 
not waver in his choice between war 
and peace when the hour came. 
With every man in his cabinet working 
in that direction, compromise failed 
thru Lincoln's firm attitude. He was 
only acting in accordance with h s pre- 
vious opinion that the Union must 
become either entirely a slave holding 
country or a free one. People called 
it "Lincoln's War" when discourage- 
ments came upon the Union cause. 
It was Lincoln's War ; when others 
faltered, he never wavered. He was 
re-elected, the North triumped at last, 
and then people discovered that it had 
been their war too. ' ' Reconstruction ' ' 
was the policy dearest to Lincoln's 
heart. It was here that the man 
shone forth. It was here that Davis 
was at his worst. Never admitting 
defeat, Davis remained at bay, the last 
citizen of the Confederacy. A word 
from him would have swayed the South 
to or from Lincoln's reconstruction 
ideas. That word was never spoken ; 
the misguided fanatic encouraged by 
Southern hatred, did his work and the 
South awoke too late to the fact that 
its best friend had fallen. I like to 
think of Lincoln as a Southerner. He 
was a southern man with northern prin- 
ciples. He had the southern humor, 
approachability, kindliness and sagacity. 
He had no prejudice against the 

[Continued on page 8] 



This Year's Program Varied and In- 
structive. Special Features. 

The second annual Farmers' Week 
of M. A. C. comes March 14-18. 
It is given for the benefit of those 
who cannot leave their homes or bus- 
iness for a sufficient length of time to 
take the other short courses. The 
program is arranged in sections, so that 
those interested in special lines of 
work will be able to get four days of 
practical instruction along the lines In 
wtiich they are most interested. 

An excellent program has been pre- 
pared for the week. The features are: 
sections on General Agriculture and 
Dairying, Horticulture and Forestry, 
the women's section, Rural Better- 
ment Day (March 18), the Corn Show 
and Judging Contest, the evening 
addresses and question boxes. Sucn 
speakers as Pres.dent Butterfieid of 
M. A. C, J. Lewis Ellsworth, State 
Board of Agriculture, Prof. F. W. 
Rane, State Forester, Mrs. Ellen H. 
Richards, M. I. T., Dr. J. B. Llndsey. 
Mass. Agricultural Experiment Station 
and Hon Charles M. Gardner, Master 
Mass. State Crange have been secured, 
not to mention many others. 

Amherst may be reached by the 
tJjston & Maine and Central Vermont 
railroads and connections. Electric 
cars connect Amherst with Holyoke, 
Northampton and Sunderland. Re- 
duced railroad rates have been granted 
m Massachusetts for guaranteed 
attendance of not less than one hund- 
red, namely : Fare and three fifths on 
round trip tickets (minimum fare 25 
cents) via B. & M., C. V., B. & A., 
N. Y., N. H. & H. railroads. Those 
attending Farmers' Week should 
secure a tick-it on the certificate plan 
at their home station. 

Board can be procured at the col- 
lege dining hall and luncheon for 
ladies at Wilder Hall, where will be 
the ladies' headquarters and rest 
rooms. 

Rooms in private houses in Amherst 
will be assigned in order of applica- 
tion, which should be made in advance 
if possible. Those who cannot be 
accommodated in Amherst can secure 

[Continued on par* 8] 



44 



ONE OF THE EIGHT " THURS. EVENING 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 32, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

EdHor-ln-Chlef. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 

Collej* Notes. 



WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910. 
EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911. 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, 



FRANK A. PROUTY, 1911. 

News Editor of this Issue 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. '11. 

SIGNAL OrFICl HOU«S. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. m. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from b-30 
to 7-30 p. u. 
Manager— Tuesday. 6-30 to 7-30 p. H. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 r. M. 
Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 m. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 1911. As»t. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912, Circulation. 



maintenance of the dining-room cer- 
tain items, such as plumbing in the 
upper rooms, which have no connec- 
tion with cost of board. The senti- 
ment of the student body is over- 
whelmingly in favor of their being a 
student committee to assist in dining- 
hall management. The motion to this 
effect was made, passed, and the 
committee instructed to report it to 
the authorities. Board cannot con- 
tinue to rise. This investigation has 
proven it must drop to a certain extent, 
and be kept there. Efficient manage- 
ment is vital. A student committee, 
serving without pay, would seem to 
solve the problem in part. 




Feb. 



Subscription $t.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Part Office. 

Vol. XX. TUESDAY, FEB. 22. No. 18 



The hockey season is over and we 
should feel proud that our team has 
brought M. A. C. out so prominently 
in this, the foremost of winter sports. 
With poor ice much of the time, they 
have practised with difficulty, yet 
played well. The Signal wishes to 
compliment Captain Brandt and 
Manager Schermerhorn for their part 
in this work. It has been very com- 
mendable. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

23—1-15 p. m., Assembly, Mrs.' 
Mabel Loomis Todd of Am- 
herst. 

7-00 P. m., Dress rehearsal for 
Senior Play, Town Hall. 
p e h. 24—8-15 p. m., Town Hall, Se- 
nior Play, " One of the Eight" 
Feb. 25—9-00 p. m., Junior Prom in 
Drill Hall. 
27 — 5-00 p. m., Vesper service in 
Chapel. Rev. Albert P. Fitch 
of Cambridge. 
29—7-00 p. m., Stockbridge 
Club in Agricultural Room. 



With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4,00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 

Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 



JAMES F. PAGE. 



Feb. 



Feb- 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



At a recent meeting of the Senate, 
a rule was passed requesting the stu- 
dents of all classes to remove their 
hats in the Union and Trophy Rooms. 
This is only the evident outcome of 
the growth of the Union and the place 
it attempts to fill. The Union room 
should be revered by all. It is the 



SOCIAL UNION 

The reader at the Social Union en- 
tertainment Saturday evening in the 
chapel was Mrs. Pearle Aiken Smith. 
Her work was of exceptional merit 
and her varied program well selected. 

She gained the interest of her audi- 
ence from the very first by her first 
selection, "Japanese Heroism." In 
this she told of the guarding of a dyna- 
mite fuse at the East Gate of Pekin by 
a small detachment of Japanese 
soldiers. The enthusiasm and utter 
disregard of self with which the little 
troop went to its death, she described 
with martial vigor. Her next recita- 



Vlolln, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT & SHOE 
REPAIRING 



AT 



LOWEST PRICES 



Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p 
All kinds of Shoe Shir 



m. 
nes 
Open Sunday until ia M. 



LEVINE 

1 1 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



THURBER'S 



Next ToPostofkicb 



DRUG 



Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



Gillette Safety Razors 
Gillette Blades 



tion was a darky woman's humorous 
only common living room of the stu- j mon olog on "Woman's Rights," the 
dents and should be so respected, dialect of which was excellent. A 
Every man believes this, for it was for ; tragic j itt i e sketch of a picture painted 

this reason that freshmen have been j by an artist with his very life blood, Gem Junior a ety azors, 
compelled to live up to this rule. Now \ f u owe d next. As Mrs. Aiken-Smith 
it is up to every man to show his j said( .< n0 program is complete without 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



appreciation of the Union Room. 
Hats off 1 



a love-story" and the love-story of the 
evening was "Mrs. Archer Archer," 
a tale which shows that "Cupid is no 
, respecter of persons. ' ' Paul Lawrence 
At the mass meeting last Thursday \ o un bar's "When Melindy Sings" was 
evening the dining hall Investigation given witn delightful charm and beauty 
committee presented its report to the ; f expression ; this was followed by 
student body. It embodied features ! Mrs Browning's "My Kate." Roy j 
which were surprises. The shortcom- 1 Ro |f e Gilson's "Grandfather" with its 
ings of the dining-hall administration intermingled humor and pathos closed 
seem to proceed from lack of an effi- tne evening's excellent entertainment, 
cient head. Consequently methods; ^ 



$1.00 
Ever Ready Safety Razors 
Blades 
Colgate's Rapid Shave Powder 

Colgate's Talcum Powder 
Tooth Powders and Tooth Pastes 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 




Makers 
of 



& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 

stmioPhv 



have become very slipshod and waste- 
ful. Large supplies of Inferior quality 
have frequently been received and 
paid for at highest market prices even 
when their condition was known. The 
buyer could have secured better prices 
than he did on many supplies. The 
management has added to the cost of 



'97.— P. 
meeting of 



H. Smith attended the 
the Association of Feed 
Control Officials at Washington, Jan. 
23. The association is working in the 
interests of uniform feed stuffs laws in 
the different states. He was elected 
a member of the executive committee. 



Deuel's Drue Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



ASK 
YOUR STATIONER 



FOR 




Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper. 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

57-63 FRANKLIN STREET, 
*' * BOSTON. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 22, 1910. 



There are seven good reasons 


why YOU should buy 


c 


A L 


C. R. 


ELDER 


Folsom 'io 


Nickless 'io 



Aggie 



Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers '12 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

"DON'T KICK" if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Oropper. 
Get the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill It." 

Guaranteed to give satisfac- 



tion. 



SOLD BY 



E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

The class of 1912 elected the fol- 
lowing class officers: President, C. C. 
Pearson; vice-president, R. K. Clapp; 
secretary and treasurer, A. F. Kings- 
bury ; Class Captain, T. J. Moreau ; 
Sergeant-at-Arms, C. E. Whitney. 
The following men were appointed to 
serve on the 1910-1912 Prom Com- 
mittee : T. J. Moreau, G. W. Tupper, 
C. C. Pearson, W. E. Philbrick, J. 
M. Heald, A. J. Ackerman, J. T. 
Maritn, R. R. Parker, E. I. Shaw, 
S. Williams. 



NOTICE 

THE DEBATINC CONTESTS. 

A considerable number of students 
are interested in the Debating Cot - \ 
tests this year, and already some have I 
handed in their names as contestants. | 
The preliminaries will be held in the 
week of March 7-11, and the final in 
the week of March 21-25. The In- 
tercollegiate with Bates College will 
be held at Amherst May 20th. The 1 
three men making the team which 
meets Bates will each receive $15 
and gold medal. These contests are 
open to all regular students. The 
names of contestants should be handed 
in not later than Friday, February 
25th. Debating Club members should 
hand their names to the President of 
Club; all others to the Instructor in \ 
Public Speaking. The question to be | 
debated may be secured from any 
member of the Debating Club, from 
the Librarian, or the Instructor in 
Public Speaking. All men interested 
should read the general information 
circulars posted on the north side of 
the stack room in the Library. 



Y. M. C. A. MEETING 

"What is the American ideal?" I 
believe that it is a college education. 
What is the influence that works for j 
this? It is the desire for knowledge, 
for ordered knowledge is science and 
science is power, authority. I am 
going to speak to you about Jesus, the 
man of science, the man of authority. 
I sometimes like to think of people as 
soil, particles of soil. Barren soil is 
hard, round, glittering, and the parti- 
cles are widely separated. That is 
the kind of soil we are before Christ 
reaches us. His science wakes us to 
fertility; his love makes us rich soil, 
dark, soft, inconceivably close to- 
gether. This science of Christ's has 
for 2000 years withstood the test of 
human opposition. His science is to 
be compared with radium ; it gives off 
light and heat forever and yet suffers 
j no loss. The only trouble is that we 
little people are unable to conceive the 
! infinite mercy and love of Christ. 
The trend of the world now is either 
for all pervading war or peace, and I 
thank Him that there are an increas- 
ing number of people in our United 
States that are for the God of Jesus 
and not the God of War." 

Mr. Lanier is the son of the author, 
and is taking the short course. His 
excellent talk was enjoyed by a large 
audience. 




^TSES 



Sanderson 
& Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
^ to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



Qtudy the plant food problem from all sides — the 
class room, the field and the factory. Don't be- 
lieve all the theorists tell you. They mean well, but 
some of them are callow, some prejudiced and some 
really ignorant ol the three conditions and needs. 
Like the free traders. They find it difficult to make 
the practice fit the theory. 

The Stockbridge Specials combine right theory with 
profitable practice. Tiny have produced record-breaking 
crops for 35 years. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 

43 CHATHAM ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylurri an,d High Streets, 



Hartford, Corin,. 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkk S. Garde. 



£&rp?rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 22, 1910- 



ONE MONTH WITH THE BLUES ! 

You have decided to have a blue or gray suit this Spring. 

And we have decided to sell it to you. 

The price is so low you can not pass it up. 

For one month, only to students. 



COLLEGE NIGHT. 

[Continued from first pag«.] 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & IVoo/ens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

fj^r* Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



STUDENT 

ILL THE MGKMES FURNITURE, 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



2$ different Foreign Copper Coins 50CIS. 
25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 
1 1. 00 

6 " dates 2cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3d. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 2scts. 

25 " Broken Bank and Confederate 
Bills #1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mall A union Circulars and 
Selling price list. 



M.D.GILMAN. C. A. MOKKKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and K IOFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to zii Main Stkrkt. 

Worcester, Mass. 




COX SONS 



AM) 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Xuillixtlllltlst, 

19 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



GAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



official and teacher you have your op- 
portunity." 

In a vigorous and enthusastic ap- 
peal, D. C. Drew, a former Yale man 
and County Secretary of the Y. M. C. 
A. .bespoke the interest and assistance 
of every man for leadership in the 
right way. "Clean athletics will give 
clean politics and then you have 
•Rural Progress' in one of its best 
forms." 

Hon. Charles M. Gardner, Chair- 
man of the House Committee on Ag- 
riculture and Master of the Massachu- 
setts State Grange, spoke of service to 
Farmer's Organizations. "1 can't say 
too much about the opportunities wait- 
ing for those young men who are going 
back to country communities. This 
is the young man's age. Now is your 
chance to do something. Be progres- 
sive, take part In town affairs ; and 
when 21 , be a citizen In deed as well as 
in name. You will receive money 
from the legislature in proportion to 
the results this college produces. 
Those results are going to show in the 
country towns; there is your opportunity 
and I leave It in your hands as to 
whether you shall take it." 

Hon. Frank A. Hosmer of Amherst, 
whose topic was the " College Man's 
Service to the State," neatly countered 
the humorous jests aimed at his Am- 
herst college days, when he said "I 
understand your success in athletics 
now, after witnessing your staying 
qualities to-night." "The State, 
said Mr. Hosmer, must every year ap- 
propriate something like $ 1 .200.000. 
for the support of state institutions. 
The one bright spot in these appropria- 
tions is the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. The members of the 
legislature regard money spent here 
as an Investment. Manufacturers of 
Massachusetts are to-day facing a crisis. 
They have either got to meet the in- 
cre?sed cost of living in some way, 
or they must locate in some region 
like the South where labor is cheap and 
living rates low. The high cost of liv- 
ing is the burning question of the hour. 
We must either increase production 
per acre or import our food from abroad. 
The Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege is the only force in Massachusetts 
today, that is working to solve this 
problem. That is why you have re- 
ceived money and that is why you 
will continue to receive it. Much has 
been given you and much is expected 
of you. Solve this problem by attend- 
ing to business here and applying your- 
self when you leave college. The 
victories of peace cost mere than those ] 
of war. Remember that, 'in the lexi- j 
con of youth worthy to succeed to a 
brilliant future there is no such word 
as fail.' " 

After cheers for every speaker, in- 
cluding "Prexy" the meeting then 
broke up with the singing of "Old 
Mass'chusetts." 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3. 50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



jE. N. PARISEAU,j» 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 

M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



WARREN AUTO CO, 

15 Maple Street, 
Northampton, - Mass. 



Autos for Hike and Ex- 
change. 

We have the agency for the 
Ford Cars you hear praised 
so highly. Five passenger 
Touring Car, all complete, 
f950. 



ONE 



OF 



THE 



EIGHT 



Town Hall 



Thursday, 



Feb. 28th 



8 P. M. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 22, 1910. 



VESPER SERVICES 

The Rev. Chas. S. Macfariand of 
South Norwalk, Conn., was the 
speaker at vesper services last Sunday 
afternoon. His subject was "The 
Peace of Jesus. " He took his sub- 
ject from John xiv. 27— "Peace I 
leave with you, my peace I give unto 
you: not as the world giveth, give I 
unto you. Let not your heart be 
troubled, neither let it be afraid." 

Dr. Macfariand said— "Let us be 
inspired by Jesus' intellectual great- 
ness. New theories being formed all 
the time are but reiterations of His 
words. Most of the world's best utter- 
ances come not from the wealthy, but 
from the poor and oppressed in hard- 
ship or distrtss. Thus Christ's noble 
inspiration, "Be bold, be courageous, 
1 have conquered the world," was 
made as he faced the Cross. 

"We have two natures, an outward 
and an inner. Either circumstance 
will conquer the inner spirit, or our 
inner nature will overcome circum- ' 
stance. Let us not be like little ships 
tossed and cast about by the buffeting 
seas of life, but let us be, rather, like 
great steamers ploughing through the ' 
billows with the steady onward im- 
pulse of a resolute purpose. Let us 
not forget to take him from our busi- 
ness to ponder on the deeper things of 
life; let us rejoice in the lessons of 
adversity, and gain strength from all 
things. Then we shall be enjoying 
the peace of Jesus. It is not a peace 
of surrender but of vi-~tnry: it is the 
peace of self-sacritice, of conflict and 
of action. The peace of Jesus is not 
gained by mystic contemplation but by 
earnest devotion to duty and responsi- 
bility. The only solution of present 
social, industrial and commercial prob- 
lems lies in the strength, the power 
and the might of the imperial spirit of 
man, following the example of Jesus. 



T. r^. PAIGE 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



M.A.C. DAY AT SOUTH HADLEY 

The Hampshire County Pomona 
Grange is to hold a Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Day at South 
Hadley en March 3rd next. The fol- 
lowing program will be given by stu- 
dents of the College: 

Music. College Orchestra. Leader. P. A 

Racicot '1 !. 
Reading. H. M. Baker "13. 
Song. College Quartet. Leader P. W. 

Allen "11. 
Speech, "The Conservation of our Natural 

Resources." 

T. Hemenway. '12. 
Cornet Solo. 

R. L. Whitney, Ml. 
Reading. 

A. H. Sharpe. '11. 
Song. 

College Quartet. 
Debate : Resolved, that the United States 

should establish a parcels post 

system. 

Affirmative— 1. C. Gilgore '11. B. 

Ostrolenk '11. 

Negative- H. F. vVillard'll. P. A. 

Racicot '11. 

Alternate, P. W. Pickard '11. 
Music, College Orchestra. 



Special Attention Given To Reception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 



llir.ll CLASS 



^■A 



• • • 



TAILOR . . . 



Foreign and domestic woolens always on hand. These 

goods arc of the most exclusive patterns, and my work is 
guaranteed to be tailored in the latest style and workmanship. 

Clemming, A luring, Repairing ami Pressing 
A Specialty* 

I : ull Dress Suits to Rent. The only place in town. 

A nice lined MEN'S FURNISHINGS. The famous 
Eagle Shirt, the K. & W. (Redman's Brand) Collars and 
Dress Shirts. Special Dancing Gloves and Dress Ties. 
Nice new line of Necktie Pins, Cuff Muttons and Studs. Bos- 
ton Garters, Suspenders, &c. 



LABROV/TZ 



1 1 Amity St. 



Phone 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 

and 

Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance 

Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

Class Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and Class 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


















The College Signal, Tuesday, February 22, 1910. 



•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••••••••••'•'•'•'•'•'•'•' 




GOODS FOR MEN. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



DEBATING CLUB 

A close and interesting debate was 
held last Wednesday evening on the 
question : "Resolved, that a city is the 
best place for a college." Pratt '12 
was on the affirmative and Haynes MO 
and Patch Ml were his opponents. 
The judges decided with difficulty in 
favor of the negative. 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 

/ . V .^^^^^^^^^^•.^•.•.•.^^•.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• V • V ■ V • V •'•'•'•'• V •'' 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE OLD CORHER DRUB STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 

A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's Block, Amukkst, Mass. 
Cut flowers always on hand. 

Tekphooa or call. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, It hath pleased God In 
His infinite wisdom to take unto Him- 
self the mother of our beloved class- 
mate, Myron W. Hazen, be it 

Resolved, That we, the members 
of the class of Nineteen Hundred and 
Ten do extend to him and his family 
our sincere sympathy in this their hour 
of sorrow, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these res- 
olutions be sent to our bereaved class- 
mate, and that a copy be filed in the 
records of the class, and that a copy 
be published in the College Signal. 
Jonathan P. Blaney, 
Louis Brandt, 
Henry A Brooks. 

For the class. 

Whereas, It hath pleased God in his 
infinite wisdom to take unto himself 
the mother of our beloved friend and 
brother, Myron S. Hazen, be it, 

Resolved, That we, the members of 
Kappa Sigma, do extend to him and 
to his family our heartfelt sympathy 
in this their hour of sorrow; and be 
it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these res- 
olutions be sent to the bereaved fam- 
ily, that a copy be filed in the records 
of the fraternity, and that a copy be 
published in the College Signal. 
Leonard S. McLaine, \ For the 
Alden C. Brett, \ Fraternity. 



quality it should be put in boxes but if 
of only medium quality, barrels only, 
pay. The commission man gets 5^ 
on butter and eggs, lCjt on perishable 
fruits, and five cents per bushel on 
potatoes, and Mr. Blodett says that he 
earns it. 

entomology. 

The department has recently pur- 
chased a copy of Hymenoptera Bio- 
logia Centrali-Americana. This expen- 
sive collection of books is very useful 
to the department. 

Quite a number of collections have 
been received as loans for study by the 
graduate students in entomology. 

George P. Englehardt of the Chil- 
drens' Museum, Brooklyn, N. Y.. has 
given to the department an interesting 
collection of Hymenoptera. 

There are forty-five Juniors taking 
entomology. 

FLORICULTURE. 

M. A. Potter of New Jersey, spoke 
to the floriculture classes, Feb. 15th, 
on "Cultural Methods of the 
Carnation." 



Holland's Block. 



Phoenix Row 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone 59-4- 

(IAS FITTING, T1NNIHG. 

CHARLES DUNCE & SON, 

PL UMBER S. 

A Specialty of KepairinR 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave.. A M H ERST. MASS 



E.B DICKINSON D.D.S. 

DEXTAIv KOOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 
( Mi H i Hours: 



Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas admin- 
stered when desired 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big. Little or Middle Sized. 
Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R- BROWN 
Savings Bank Bl'k, 

Amherst, - - " Mass - 



J. H. TROTT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Finer, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

POMOLOGY. 

W. H. Blodgett of Worcester spoke 
in French Hall, Feb. 16th to those 
interested in pomology on "The Com- 
mission Man's Side of the Fruit 
Business." Mr. Blodgett has been 
in the commission business in Wor- 
cester since 1881, and as a result of 
his large experience was able to give 
i an interesting and helpful talk to the 
large number of men attending. 

Mr. Blodgett began by saying that 
it was not always advisable to sell to 
the commission man, as much better 
prices could often be obtained by sell- 
ing f. 0. b. to the wholesaler. Among 
the facts that the speaker emphasized 
were these: color in fruit is more 
important in selling than quality; New 
England apples lack color but their 
quality is of the best ; good packing is 
essential to good prices. He espec- 
ially emphasized the value of having a 
special brand for your fruit, so that it 
would be known, whenever mentioned. 
Such are the "Canyon Crest" brand 
of oranges and the "Star and Cres- 
cent" brand of apples. Mr. Blodgett 
said that if your fruit was of excellent 



Prof. E. White spoke to the Short 
Course students and to those interested 
in Landscape Gardening on "Ornamen- 
tal Cardens and Garden Material.*' 

The members of the short course 
in floriculture made a two days trip to 
Boston in order to visit the Urge com- 
mercial establishments in that vicinity. 
The class in charge of Prof. E. A. 
White left Amherst early Friday morn- 
ing to first visit the carnation establish- 
ment of Wiliiam Nicholson and S. J. 
Goddard of Framingham. Later In 
the day the orchid houses of Mr. But- 
terworth and the Waban rose conserv- 
atories in Natick were visited. Sat- 
urday the early morning was spent in 
viewing the Park Street flower market, 
the Music Hall flower market, Gal- 
vin's retail store and MacMulkin's 
retail store. The remainder of the 
morning was spent at Peter Fisher's 
houses at Ellis and in the afternoon 
William Sim's greenhouses at Clifton- 
dale were examined. Sweet peas and 
violets are Mr. Sim's specialty while 
carnations are exclusively grown by 
Mr. Fisher. The last place visited 
was Thomas Roland's of Nahant, who 
grows fine potted plants for Easter 
! trade. 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The station has published Bulletin 
132, by P. H. Smith and J. C. Reed, 
containing the results of the 1909 
inspection of commercial feed stuffs. 

The Agricultural Commission of the 
Legislature has reported favorably the 
bill for inspection of apiaries and con- 
trol of contagious diseases among bees. 
The station is pushing the bill. 

H. D. Haskins attended a recent 
Farmers' Institute at Haverhill, speak- 
ing on "Selection and Use of Com- 
mercial Fertilizers" and "Use of Fer- 
tilizers in Greenhouse Management." 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

2-j Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM. 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. Af. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amherst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 22, 1910. 



ALUMNI NEWS 

The Seventh Annual Dinner of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
club of Washington, D. C. will be held 
on Saturday, Feb. 26, at 7 p. m. at the 
Y. M. C. A. Building, 1736 G Street, 
N. W. Tickets. $2.00. 

(Signed) C. H. Griffin '04, 

Acting Secretary. 

'77.— D. H. Benson. Chemist and 
Superintendent of Acid works for the 
Wilson & Toomer Fertilizer Co., 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ex-'94. — E. W. Mjrse, who, since 
graduating from Harvard in 1897, has 
been a member of the faculty of 
Bussey Institute, is now on the editor- 
ial staff of the Experiment Station 
Record. 

'95. — H. A Ballou, Entomologist, 
Imperial Department of Agriculture, 
Barbados, is studying at S:. Lucia the 
cotton industry of that island. 

'97. — G. A. Drew addressed the 
Conn. Pomological society, Feb. 3, on 
" Reclaiming the Old Apple Orchard 
for the Production of High Grade 
P>uit." He was elected vice-president 
of the society. 

'00.— J. W. Kellogg has been re- 
appointed state chemist for Penn- 
sylvania. 

'00.— Dr. A. W. Morrill is author 
of 12 of 13 of the series of short, con- 
cise, popular circulars on citrus pests 
published by the Arizona Horticultural 
Comm. The improved system of 
fumigation for white fly which Dr. 
Morrill originated while in Florida has 
been introdnced into California. Con- 
cerning it, the 1909 report of the chief 
of the Bnreau of Entomology (p. 3 1 ) 
states: " Results from the use of this 
system on several hundred acres of 
citrus groves have demonstrated a 
striking superiority over those gained 
previously, while it seems quite prob- 
able that after the general adoption of 
the system a single treatment every 
second year will accomplish the same 
results as an annual treatment, giving 
an annual saving of from 30 to 50 per 
cent of the present cost." This is esti- 
mated at over $1 ,000,000 a year in 
California. 

'03.— Dr. H. J. Franklin will, in 
the near future, entertain the mem- 
bers of the graduate school with a 
dinner. 

'04.— Born to Mr. and Mrs. S. B. 
Haskell, at Amherst, Feb. 18, a son. 

'04. — S. R. Parker lectured before 
the Amherst Grange Feb. 4 on his 
practical experience in the Sandwich 
Islands. 

'07.— A. A. Hartford visited friends 
about college recently. 

'08. — John Daniel recently visited 
college. 

'08. — C. H. Allen spent a few days 
last week with college friends. He is 
continuing his study of Immigration 
Problems in this vicinity. 

'08.— J. Danisl, Kingston, R. I. 



THE H. L FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 

STAMFORD, CONN. 




THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 



BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 



SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 



At the Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 18-24, 1909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, (Basic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Four 

Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 
Silver Medal. This fruit was raised by Mr. 
Georgi .\ Drew, of Connecticut, M. A. C, Class 

of 1 S97. (Our pamphlet M Up To Date I'ruit (iron 

ing" is sent free if you mention Tht ColUgt Signal) 






The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



We also distribute from Boston, M.iss.. Belfast, Me, Baltimore, 

Md.. Wilmington, N.C., Savannah, <ia., and Charleston, S.C. 






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The Campus Fence — gathering place 
for all good fellows. Tales of victory, 
and time to smoke Fatima Cigarettes. 

The smoke that pleases and satisfies. Perfectly 
blended Turkish tobacco. Inexpensively packed 
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X 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 22, 1910. 



'08. — Summers, Regan and John- 
ston have passed tneir examination in 
Botany and Whitmarsh his entomology 
examinations. 

'08. — R. H. Jackson has been 
admitted to membership in the firm of | 1( .) 9 *9 
Jackson & Cutler, Amherst. 



FARMERS' WEEK 

I Continued from first page] 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Below is a list of courses offered by the College for the first time in 
Several other courses have been greatly amplified and extended. 
In the Department of Agricultural Education: 

Sriinii-.ir in Kducation. 

In the Division of Agriculture: 

Field Crop Improvement, Advanced Solto, Manun-wnd Fertilize,*, Principles^ L.veStock 
anient, Dairy Cattle, Feeding and Management of P 



Making, Manufactured Mdk Products 



Live -Stock. Market Milk, Hutter 



rooms in Northampton. Expenses, 
board and room will be from $1.60 to 
about $2.50 per day. 

Registration and assignment of 
rooms taKes place at the office of the 
Director of Short Courses, North Col- 
lege, March 14. For programs and 
further information concerning Far- 
mers' Week, or to secure board and 
room, address Wm. D. Hurd, Direc- 
tor of Short Courses, M. A. C, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

Everyone is urged to take this splen- 
did opportunity to visit the state col- 
lege and to benefit from the week's 
discussions and to bring Farmer's 
Week to the attention of their friends. 



LINCOLN AND DAVIS 

[Continued 'rom first page] 



South ; Lincoln recognized only too 
well the awful predicament of the 
southern slave-holders. 'They are 
the same people as we are,' he said. 
We would do just as they are doing if 
we were in their places.' 

"Lincoln was an American states- 
man. He was also an American 
citizen to whom everyone may point 
with pride. His genius alone accounts 
for his career. He did ordinary things 
in an ordinary way, extraordinary 
things in an heroic way. When all is 
said and done, Lincoln will ever 
remain the saviour and protector of his 
country." 



In the Department of Chemistry: 

Advanced Analysis Chemistry of Sugar Making and Helming. 

In the Division of Horticulture: 

„JB i^ssii^sira^^^l-ire^-;--"- S* *" c ""' 

In the Division of Humanities: 

Department of I. anguage and Literature— -_. P-rindic-il Writ- 

train, ng Course (double course- AjjnettU«U* Llo£~g« ^J«»g jggSft, S Purl 
l„g, Pmimlut in loumaliam ii^^^^SSmuSSSmCmU& Eighteenth Century 
tan and Restoration Litaw me. EarU P.g tee , l i , - , ' u " i > } e ,,;, , Nineteenth Century l.iter- 
Llteratttre, 1 lans.tion K.ghteentl, Nn ete. -i.tl U '"^ ; , e '. ', el)att ./ A( ivanced French (double 
ature. Advanced Litem y study. Oration, AromUMoni .Advanced German (double course), 
S£& F ^^^ S3 interpretat.on of Mastc. 

Department of Political Science— 

Economic History, The History of New England. 1 he ll.story of Ideals. 

In the Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Civil Engineering: 

\nalytic Mechanics, Descriptive Geometry. 

In the Department of Physical Education and Hygiene: 

, lvK ie„e.Flementary(;ymnastics, Graded Gymnastics, Heavy GyMMfttkS. I ra.n.ng Course, 
Advanced Gymnastics. 

In the Department of Rural Social Science: 

Elements of Agricultural Economic, Historical and Comparative Agriculture, Specific Pro- 
1.1,-n.s in Agricultural Economics, Seminar (double course). 

The trm "double c ourse" indicates that the course 1, given for ^thjeniest^o^the^ear. 

SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 
J. F. Adams, Manager 
C. A. Lodge, Jr., Manager 
R. S. Eddy, Manager 
I G. Schermerhorn, Manager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 
H. W. Blaney, Manager 
F. A. Castle, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 
R. H. Allen, President 
L. S. Dickinson, Mar.ager 
H. W. French, President 
B. Ostrolenk, President 
A. H. Sharpe, President 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 



Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Debating Club, 

Dramatic Society, 

M. A. C. Literary Monthly, 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST, MASS. 



COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

Pressing, 



M. A. C— S. T. S. HOCKEY 
GAME 

[Continued from first page.] 



Guillow. Best. Berry, Sanctuary, Peckham. 
Time of halves. 15 minutes, extended time, 
four five-minute periods. Goal judges. 
H. C. Buck and L. G. Schermerhorn. 
Referee. H. G. Beal. Timers, T. W. Bean 
and W. F. Donnelly. 

FOUND— A railroad ticket on the cam- 
pus. Owner can have same by proving 
property and calling at Treasurer's Office. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



BEST of Cleansing, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Hear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. E. Roberts. 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rate* 

AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. It. CO. 



Do you want Security for Borrowing 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Life Insurance Offers to You a cheap 
and Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS.iUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irving G. Davis, Agent, 12 North 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

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MANUFACTURERS <>K 



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consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



SPRINGFIELD 
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The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XX. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, March i, 1910. 



No. 19 



JUNIOR PROMENADE 



GOOD SHOWING 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



Drill Hall Presents a Brilliant Specta- 
cle. Many Sleighing Parties 
Saturday. 

The class 01 1911 held the greatest 
social event of the year, the Junior 
Promenade, in the Drill Hall last 
Friday evening, February 25th. 
Thirty-three couples. representing 
every class in college, were present 
and enjoyed the beautiful decorations, 
the excellent music and the pleasant 
company. It was acknowledged by 
all to be the most successful and en- 
joyable "Prom" held in recent years. 
Nature did her part in providing the 
best of weather, both for "Prom" 
night and for Saturday's sleighride ; 
the committee did their parts in hav- 
ing all arrangements of the first class 
order; and the company did their part 
in entering into the festivities in the 
real "Prom" spirit. 

The hall was never more beautiful. 
The distinctive and prevailing feature 
was the natural effect, gained by the 
use of hundreds of cedar trees of 
various sizes, small ones running along 
the walls, and large ones cutting off 
the north end of the hail, and backed 
by a net, filled with boughs of hemlock. 
In the center of this net, an arch 
opened into a large cozy corner be- 
yond. At the entrance of the arch 
stood a large bed of narcissus and 
daffodils from the college greenhouses 
and over it, the class numerals, 1911, 
were engraved in white. At the 
southern end of the hall, under the 
balcony, were four cozy corners, sepa- 
rated from the main hall by tall cedars, 
the entrances being approached 
through groups of potted lilacs. Be- 
tween the two central apartments, 
stood the national colojs, planked on 
one side by the state and on the other 
by the battalion colors. Overhead, 
under the balcony rail, laurel covered 
the wail, and imbedded in it was a 
large "Massachusetts," done in white. 
The main walls were finished in white, 
with bands of maroom at regular in- 
tervals, the bands extending into 
maroom streamers which converged 
at the two arc lights, at either end of 
the hall. From the center of the 
ceiling, hung a large festoon of laurel 
boughs, which was wired with a com- 
bination of maroon and white lights, 
scattered here and there and produc- 
ing a feature of the decorations. The 
two arc lights were surrounded with 
laurel, so that the rays filtered through 
in fine streams. The patronesses' 
corner was in the northwestern part 
of the hall and was almost surrounded 
with small cedars, the chairs being 

{.Continued on paee 4] 



"ONE OF THE EIGHT" j LATEST NEWS FROM MARS 



M. A. C. Takes Eleven Points at Hart- 
ford. Wesleyan Wins with 
Thirteen Points. 

At the Hartford Meet held last 
Monday cur tracK team finished sec- 
ond in an intercollegiate meet with 
Wesleyan and Tufts. Wesleyan won 
with 13 points, we scored I I , while 
Tufts finished third with 3 points. 
The meet, held before a large crowd 
of about 4000, under the auspices of 
the Second Division, Conn. N. G.,and 
was the first to be held in the new 1st 
Regiment Armory. In the triangular 
meet the following events were run 
off: 75 yd. dash, I mile relay, and 1 
mile run. Our entries in the open 
meet were on the half-mile novice, 
shot-put. high-jump, pole vault and 1 
mile relay events. 

The 75 yd. dash was the first event 
to be run off. In the first heat Bacon 
of Wesleyan finished first with Swartz 
of Tufts second. Robson, Wesleyan 
won the second heat while Lew, our 
only entry, took second. In this heat 
Lew injured his leg so severely that 
he was unable to land a place in the 
final. Robson won the final with 
Bacon second and Swartz third. 
Time, 8 sec. Points scored in this 
event: Wesleyan 8, Tufts I, M. A 
C. 0. 

Caldwell, Dee and Rose were our 
entries in the mile run. Phalen of 
Tufts set a hot pace and by the 
seventh lap had a lead of over a 
quarter of a lap, our men remaii.ing 
well in the rear. After the seventh 
lap, however, Dee and Caldwell, with 
Atwater of Tufts following, began to 
cut down Phalen's lead. Phalen was 
passed on the eighth lap "and our 
runners were well ahead of the field. 
Caldwell won with a ten- yard lead over 
Dee who had fifteen yards on Atwater. 
Time 4 min. 56 sec. This is a new 
intercollegiate record for the Hartford 
Meet. Points scored in 1 mile run: 
M. A. C. 8, Tufts I, Wesleyan 0. 

In the mile relay (440 yds. per mam 
our team consisted of Damon, 
Barrows, Lew and Clapp. Damon 
had the pole, Hastings of Wesleyan 
the center and Morrison of Tufts, the 
outside. When Damon slipped on the 
first turn Hastings took the poie and 
the lead. He finished seven yards 
! ahead of Damon, who had the same 
lead on Morrison. After this relay 
Tufts was practically out of the race. 
Schlee of Wesleyan and Barrows took 
up the running on the second relay 
and Wesleyan's lead was increased to 
twenty-five yards. Schlee gave this 
lead over to Wendell and Lew relieved 



igio Presents Play in Town Hall, 
matic Talent Shown. 



Dra 



[Continued on pare 8. J 



If a full house, a satisfied audience 
and a performance smoothly carried 
off constitute success "One cf t hf 
Eight" most certainly experienced it, 
last Thursday evening when the Seniors 
gave the play for the first time in 
Amherst. From the rise of the cur- 
tain until it dropped for the last time, 
there was no lack of interest or excite- 
ment. 

Henry Brooks, as his namesake, a 
"strapping" young oarsman was very 
good, and he handled the dramatic 
passages very creditably. G. N. Vin- 
ton could hardly have been improved 
upon as a country girl of the "bump- 
kin" type, and he acted his part in a 
most comical manner. L. S. Mc- 
Laine appeared to advantage as a 
"very British," Lord Chillingworth, 
he had a grace and dramatic polish 
that would have done credit to a pro- 
fessional. The part of Bill Carter, 
the Bookworth crew captain was taken 
by Louis Brandt and it would have 
been hard to find a better piece of 
amateur acting. W. R. Clarke did 
well as Caleb Weston, the oarsman 
who forsakes Bookworth for her rival. 
The scene in which he challenges 
Brooks, "the knight of Bockworth" to 
row for the hand of Helen Baldwin, 
was excellent. W. C. Johnson as Guy 
Marks made a magnetic hypnotist and 
"heavy" villain. Professor Dixon, 
the faculty member of the Bookworth 
athletic council, was handled well by 
E. H. Turner. Ross Annis as Mollie 
Runskool was a very life like freshman 
who turns from Shelley to intoxlcatea 
hilarity. He was especially good in 
the last act. The part of Henry 
Brooks' father was taken by H. T. 
Cowles who made a very natural 
farmer. O. V. T. Urban was a good 
collegian and oarsman, who played the 
part of associate villain with W. C. 
Johnson, A. R. Cloues had the part 
of Peter, my lord's valet, and did it 
extremely well. The part of Helen 
Baldwin, a young lady interested in 
Brooks, was taken by S. W. Mendum. 
Hayward was Amy Dixon, the college 
widow and A. F. Rockwood played 
the part of Mrs. Brooks. All these 
feminine parts were well taken but the 
actors naturally lacked feminine grace. 

The four scenes were laid at Henry 
Brooks', Sr. farmhouse tnd the 
curiosity room in the Delta Sigma 
fraternity house. The scenery was 
good in view of the fact that it was all 
made on short notice, the scenery that 
was expected to be used being barred 

Continued oa pace .3] 



Mrs. Mabel Loom is Todd Lectures at 
Assembly. 

Mri. Mabel Loomls Todd, whose 
husband, Prof. David Todd of Amherst, 
is veil known for his extensive astro- 
nomical work, gave an exceedingly 
interesting talk at last Wednesday's 
chapel exercises on "The Latest 
Newb from Mars. " 

In opening Mrs. Todd said that "the 
subject of Mars has always been Inter- 
esting, picturesque and even sensa- 
tional." To her the new astronomy 
involving the movements and composi- 
tion of the stars has been of more 
interest than the merely mathematical 
brancn of the science. The best place 
in this counlry for astronomical obser- 
vations is in the Arizona desert. Here 
is found the steady air that the astrono- 
mer needs In work of a delicate nature. 
As far back as 1730 Newton realized 
that the only remedy for indefinite, 
shaky- edged images in telescopes was 
serene and quiet air such as is found 
on tops of high mountains. 

So when in the spring of 1907, Pro- 
fessor Todd began his more extensive 
study of Mars, he chose Chill as the best 
place for his work, loi on the great 
Chilian nitrate plateau there Is no 
vegetation, hence no rainfall and no 
clouds, and all the nights are clear. 
In addition to this, Mars could be seen 
at its zenith for a longer time from 
Chill tha from any other suitable 
place in the world. The great 
Amherst college telescope was with Its 
base transported bodily to Sout.i 
America and there set up in the short 
time of four days by the enthusiastic 
amateur astronomers employed in the 
British nitrate companies. The very 
first glance through the telescope con- 
firmed the statements of Scambarelii 
and others, who had for years been 
disbelieved as to the "canall" on 
Mars. It was in 1877 that Scam- 
barelii 's announcement came of his 
discovery of black lines upon Mars' 
surface. His theory was that the 
planet's ice-cap, which could be plainly 
seen, melted each summer and that 
the water ran off in "canali," as he 
called them. Since Scambarelii was 
the only one to trouble to make his 
observations from a mountalntop, 
he was laughed at until finally 
nis observations were confirmed by 
another mountain-climbing astronomer. 
"Canali," which means channels, was 
immediately taken to mean canals, 
and the popular theory that some form 
of intelligent life existed on Mars 
sprang up. 

"I do not say that there is life on 

[Continued on pace 51 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March i, 19 10. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



WALTER R. CLARKE, 1910. 
HENRY A. BROOKS. 1910. 
LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910, 
JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910. 
EDGAR M. BROWN, 1911. 



Editor-in-Chief. 

College Notes. 

Athletic Notes. 

Alumni Notes. 

Department Notes. 



HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, College Notes. 
FRANK A. PROUTY, 1911. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1 - 1 5 r.u. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from 0-30 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday. 6-30 to 7-30 r. m. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. u. 
Thursday 11-15 to 12 u. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON, 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN. 191 1. Asat. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT. 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



times. It would bring us in closer 
touch and bring about a unity and a 
spirit of co-operation that cannot be 
had in connections in the class rooms 
or even at receptions. 



Entered as 
Pest Office. 



second-class matter at the Amherst 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, MAR. 1. No. 19 



Informal Dance next Saturday. 



Do we want an athletic field? One 
would hardly ask that question if he 
had been at the chapel exercises on 
Friday. We do want the athletic 
field, not because we think athletics 
are the only thing to come to college 
for, but for the reason that it's "now 
or never" and we want Xht field. 
Athletics have their place in the life of 
college men which we cannot fill by 
anything else. We want the athletic 
field, or better still, the recreation field 
to be a playground for everybody in 
college. There are three states of 
man— Physical, Mental and Spiritual 
and to make men, college must 
develope all these three. We do 
appreciate what the Commonwealth 
has done for us and we are going out 
to make good but we ask for the ath- 
letic field as well as other things that 
we may be mote able to raise our 
standards of making good. 




With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4.00 COURT TIES 

JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 



Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 



JAMES F. PAGE. 



"Oh! womankind, a wilderness of sweets." 
Once again Father time has brought 
the hands of the yearly clock around 
to Prom week. Again the old drill 
hall has shaken her warlike appear- 
ance and the Goddess of Love has 
reigned supreme. Surely 1911 is to 
be congratulated upon the occasion. 
It was a success in every way. 



Dramatics surely has won its place 
at M. A. C. The class of 1910 has 
set the pace with her Junior and Sen- 
ior plays. Her presentation of " One 
of the Eight'' last Thursday evening 
was certainly a success. Talent is 
abundant in college, why should we 
bury it? Why not make it a custom 
to have a play during Junior Week? 
There ought to be enough talent to 
write our plays in the future. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Mar. 1,7-00 p. M. — Stockbidge club. 
Mar. 2. 4-30 p. M.— Assembly, chapel. 
Song Recital by Edith Alida 
Bullard. 
Mar. 6-45 p. m.— Debating club, Agri- 
cultural Lecture room. 
Mar. 3, 6-45 P. M.— Y. M. C. A. 
Isaburo Nagai, leader. 
m. — Informal, Drill 



E. E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



chapel. 
Mar. 5, 4-00 p. 

hall. 
Mar. 6, 5-00 p 

Rev. 

Boston. 
Mar. 7, 3-00 p. m. — Union Meet. 



M. — Vespers, chapel, 
Thomas Van Ness. 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <£ SHOE 
REPAIRING 

AT 

LOWEST PRICES 

a. m. to 



Open from 7 
All kinds of Shoe 
Open Sunday 



m. 
ines 
until 12 M. 



[) 9P- 
Shim 



LEVINE 

1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



1 1 



DEUEL'S 
DRUG 



With this issue, the Signal Board 
competition closes. It has been a 
mighty good one. The candidates 
have worked hard and the men who 
have done the most work both in quan- 
tity and quality are the men who will 
win. The spirit of the system is good 
but its workings are not of the best. 
A change should be made in the man- 
ner of giving the credits. The method 
at present is too loose. 



The informal dances bid fair to be 
a complete success this year. A large 
number of students are attending and 
are making them the best times of the 
year. There is one drawback. We 
are missing the attendance of the fac- 
ulty. Unless serving as patrons and 
patronesses we rarely see them. All 
the student body sincerely wish that 
they would come and share our good 



COLLEGE NOTE 

The first event of the Union-M. A. 
C. track meet, to take place next 
Monday, will be a local heavy-weight 
sprint between the Senior and Junior 
classes. Francis Beeman ("Tubby") 
of Amherst will represent the class of 
1910 and Ralph C. Robinson ("Fat") 
of South Boston will do the honors tor 
the class of 191 1. The dash will con- 
sist of two laps around the track 
(260yds.) The officials are: Starter, 
Mr. Gribben; judge at the finish, 
Robert Parker: timers, John P. 
Blaney '10 and Herbert W. Blaney 
Ml. This race has been expected for 
some time and each sprinter is in the 
pink of condition and trained down to 
the following weights: Beeman 241 
pounds, Robinson 235 pounds. 



$i.oo 



TROY MEET. 

Our relay team was defeated at the 
Troy games last Tuesday night by the 
crack team representing Pratt Institute 
of Brooklyn, N. Y., the winner's time 
being 3 min. 31 3-5 sec. Pratt made 
the third fastest time of the evening, 
Syracuse beating Wesleyan in 3.26 2-5, 
a new record. Our time was not 
taken but judging from the distance at 



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AMHERST, MASS. 




Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
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Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 

SAMUEL WARD CO., 

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BOSTON. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March i, 1910. 



"ONE OF THE EIGHT" 

[Continued from first page.] 



from the hall because of insurance 
rates. Prof. F. B. McKay coached 
the cast and F. L . Thomas was stage 
manager. Th« college orchestra fur- 
nished music between acts. 
The program was as follows : — 

THE CAST. 

Henry Brooks, oarsman. Henry A Brooks 
Mr. Brooks, his father. H. T. Cowles 

Mrs. Brooks, his mother. A. R. Rockwood 
Helen Baldwin. S. W. Mendum 

Bab. a country lass, G. N. Vinton 

Lord Chillingworth, English Lord. 

L. S McLaine 



Peter, his valet' 
Guy Marks, hypnotist. 
Caleb Weston. 
Ned Andrews. 



A. R. Cloues 

W. C Johnson 

w\ R Clarke 

V. T. Urban 



Mollie Runskool. a freshman. Ross E. Annis 
Bill Carter, captain of crew. 

Louis Brandt 

Prof. Dixon, College Professor. 

E. H. Turner 
Amy Dixon, his daughter. 

'• Lady " Hayward 

Ex-'03. — F. W. Webster died a 
short time ago from a sudden attack of 
appendicitis. He was a prominent 
engineer of the Baltimore Construction 
Co. 



There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



Folsom 'io 



Nickless 'io 



Aggie 



Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers '12 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

"DON'T KICK" if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Dropper. 
Get the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill It." 

Guaranteed to give satisfac- 
tion. 

SOLD BY 

E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 



the finish, It was not slower that 3.35. 
Pratt is an instituton of over 600 
students. Their relay team has raced 
all winter in local New York meets, 
and has had much experience. 

We lost the toss for the pole. The 
track had but to banks and had two 
forty-yard straightaways. On a track of 
this kind the pole is as much as a six- 
yard lead. Captain Dickinson trailed 
his man closely for one lap and on the 
second tried to pass, but failed. On 
the third lap Dickinson's man fairly 
ran away and gave his team-mate a 
six-yard lead. Cloues took the tag 
from Dickinson and started off like a 
whirlwind, picking up his handicap in 
one lap, racing neck and neck in the 
second, only to lose fully twelve yards 
on the last lap. He turned over the 
running to S. C. Brooks who had a 
man against him with a consistent re- 
cord of under two minutes for the half 
mile. Brooks lost ten yards more on 
his relay. Dudley was our last man 
and ran splendidly. He held his own 
and even gained a little, finishing not 
more than twenty yards behind his man. 

The average time of our men was 
approximately 53 3-5 sec. This is for 
a quarter mile, the relay being a full 
mile. Considering the time made by 
Pratt and that the two-turn track was 
absolutely new to our men, they did 
very well indeed. Our men fought 
hard all the way and were necessarily 
exhausted at the finish. Though the 
distance would not indicate It. Pratt 
was kept on the jump from start to 
finish. 



COMMUNICATION 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Amherst, Mass., Feb. 26, 1910. 
Hon. Marquis F. Dickinson, 
53 State St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir : It was a great surprise 
and as great a pleasure to this class 
yesterday morning to be able to recive 
you into its membership, and aithough 
a response was made to our proposition 
at the time we now ask the privilege 
of extending to you in writing a most 
hearty welcome. This is because of 
your official relationship to us. But 
still weightier reasons are Influential In 
this action since we have become 
more fully acquainted with yourself, 
your personal history and the history 
of your family as it has been inter- 
woven with the history of this institution. 

Furthermore as a class in this col- 
lege we take pleasure in using this 
opportunity to express our warm thanks 
for the distinguished and efficient ser- 
vice you are now rendering our Alma 
Mater. With high regard, 

Very respectfully yours, 

The Class of 1912. 
C. C. Pearson, President. 
A. F. Kingsbury, Secretary. 

'03.— M. H. West, the superintend- 
ent of the Lincoln Park System of 
Chicago visited friends about college 
recently. 




Sanderson 
k Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

the country produces. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a pleasing 
one. 

We solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
& Thompson, 

Clothiers, 
Hatters, 
Tailors. 



Otudy the plant food problem from all sides — the 
class room, the field and the factory. Don't be- 
lieve all the theorists tell you. They mean well, but 
some of them are callow, some prejudiced and some 
really ignorant ol the true conditions and needs. 
Like the free traders, they find it difficult to make 
the practice fit the theory. 

The Stockbridge Specials combine right theory with 
profitable practice. They have produced record-breaking 
crops for 35 years. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 

43 CHATHAM ST., BOSTON 



HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum, arid High Streets, 



Hartford, Corm,. 



One block from Unjon Station. Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modern hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Wai.tkk S. Garde. 



f&rpfivter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March i, 1910. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 1, 1910. 



ONE MONTH WITH THE BLUES ! 

You have decided to have a blue or gray suit this Spring. 

And we have decided to sell it to you. 

The price is so low you can not pass it up. 

For one month, only to students. 



THE JUNIOR "PROM" 

[Continued from first page] 



A. P. SIMPSON 

Worsted & Woolens 
Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, 'to. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 



Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



riOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



M. D. GILMAN. C. A. MOFFKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 
IN 

CONFECTIONERY. 

207 to 211 Main street. 

Worcester, Mass. 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins socts. 
J5 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

fi.oo 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces socts. 

6 " dates 3d. pieces socts. 

6 " dates nickel cents 25Cts. 

25 " Broken Bank and Confederate 

Bills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mall Aiirtioii Circular* mid 

Selling price list. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



HERBERT E. MOREY 

Numismatist, 
19 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON. 



CAPS and GOWNS 

BEST MATERIALS and 
WORKMANSHIP 



arranged In a semicircle, a mission 
lamp in the background adding to the 
effect. The orchestra stand was situ- 
ated In the northeast corner, and was 
surrounded by small cedars and potted 
plants. The refreshment booth stood 
in the western part of the hall, oppo- 
site the entrance, and was prettily 
flanked by cedars, potted plants and 
cut flowers. The furniture was well 
selected, large chairs and soft pillows 
offering luxurious ease, after a strenu- 
ous dance. 

The reception began at eight o'clock, 
the following patronesses being in the 
receiving line: Mrs. W. N. Berry. 
Mrs. A. V. Osmun, Mrs. E. K. 
Eyerly, Mrs. J. B. Paige, Mrs. F. C. 
Sears, Mrs. W. D. Hurd, Mrs. E. A. 
White and Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck 
During the reception, a concert, con- 
sisting of the following numbers, was 
given by Hardy's Orchestra of 
Worcester : 

1. March. 'Manisot." Brooke 

2. Operatic Selection, "Bright Eyes." 

Hochua 

3. Waltz. •Tout Paris." Waldtenfel 

4. Duet. "The Butterfly." Bendix 
Mr. Valve. Flute, and Mr. Jourville. Clarinet 

5. Egyptian Serenade. -'Amina." Lincke 

The same orchestra provided music 
for the dancing which followed, there 
being twenty-eight numbers on the 
program. Sherry of M.A. C. catered 
at intermission at 1 2 until l o'clock. 
Dancing began at 9.90 p. m. and con- 
tinued till 4 A. M. 

The committee in charge consisted 
of: E. L. Winn of Holden, chair- 
man; Prof. E. A. White, Prof. J. A. 
^oord, A. P. Bursley of Barnstable, 
H. W. Blaney of Swampscott, I. W. 
Davis of Lowell, N. H. Hill of Glen- 
moore, N. J., E. A. Larrabee of 
Salem, H. A. Pauly of Somerville, 
P. W. Pickard of Hopedale, F. A. 
Prouty of Worcester and L. 0. Stev- 
enson of Hackensack, N. J. 

Those present were : H. A. 
Brooks '10 and Miss Hazel Bolles of 
Mount Holyoke College ; S. C. 
Brooks '10 and Miss Elinor Hall of 
Wellesley college ; A. F. Rockwood 
'10 and Miss Helen Keyes of Concord; 
W. M. Titus '10 and Miss Margaret 
Burleigh of Smith College ; E. F. 
Damon '10 and Miss Elsa Luick of 
Dorchester; L. S. Dickinson '10 and 
Miss Edith Morgan of Amherst ; J. P. 
Blaney MO and Miss Jeaune McEwen 
of Wellsville, N. Y. ; W. E. Leonard 
'10 and Miss Elizabeth Marshall of 
Waterloo, N. Y. ; L. C. Brown '13 
and Miss Mary Peterson of Smith 
College; H. R. Francis '10 and Miss 
Rachel Gilmore of Waban, Mass. ; 
L. O. Stevenson 'I 1 and Miss Harriet 
Cobb of Amherst; I. C. Gilgore '11 
and Miss Elizabeth Jones of Schenec- 
tady. N. Y. ; F D. McGraw '11 and 
Miss Edith Midzley of Chicago, III. ; 
C. A. Lodge '11 and Miss Fanchon 
Hathaway of Chicago, III. ; F. A. 
Prouty '1 1 and Miss Florence Farns- 




A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 

Wearers never worry because they 

know that their shoes are 

right. 

Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 

E.M. BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 



S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. Phillips Block 
Amherst, Mass. 



j>E. N. PARISEAU.j* 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &S0N 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



WARREN AOTO CO., 

15 Maple Street, 
Northampton, - Mass. 



Autos for Hire and Ex- 
change. 

We have the agency for the 
Ford Cars you hear praised 
so highly. Five passenger 
Touring Car, all complete, 
$950. 



worth of Mount Holyoke College ; A. 
P. Bursley '11 and Miss Mildred 
Manro of Smith College; F. A. 
McLaughlin '11 and Miss Roberts of 
Bridgeport. Conn. ; E. A. Larrabee 
'1 I and Miss Elizabeth Case of New 
Jersey; H. H. Howe 'II and Miss 
Gladys Noble of Springfield; P. W. 
Allen Ml and Miss D^lly Searle of 
Smith College; H. F. Willard 'II 
and Miss Mary Hyatt of Leominster; 
N. H. Hill '11 and Miss Hazel Hulton 
of Mount Holyoke College; A. H. 
Sharp '1 1 and Miss Mabel McFeeters 
of Mount Holyoke College; H. W. 
Blaney '11 and Miss Marion D. Mun- 
sey of Swampscott; B. G. Southwick 
'12 and Miss Amy Wallbury of Smith 
College; S. Williams '12 am Miss 
Elaine Whitman of Smith College; 
A. .A. Hammond '12 and Miss 
Florence Cartwick of Oran?e. N. J. ; 
J. M. Heald '12 and Miss Ruth 
Robinson of Vassar College; S. M. 
Jordan '13 and Miss Zahn of Ruther- 
ford, N. J,; Ceorge Zabriske '13 
and Miss Ewerz of Rutherford, N. J. ; 
J. D. Pellett '13 and Miss Ruth 
Flack of Smith College; H. P. Gil- 
more and Miss Margaret Sage of Hart- 
ford, Conn.; and H. I. Day and Miss 
Beatrice Armijo of Smith College. 
President K. L. Butterfield, Prof. 
W. D. Hurd and Dr. J. B. Paige 
were also present. 

On Saturday, the Prom goers 
enjoyed sleigh nd^s, going in parties 
to severai of the neighboring towns and 
enjoying dinner parties and dancing, 
returning "By the Light of the S Ivery 
Moon." 



PRELIMINARY DEBATING 
CONTESTS. 

The preliminary Debating Contests 
will be held next week in the following 
order: 

1. The Freshman-Sophomore con- 
test on Tuesday evening March 8th, 
commencing at 700 o'clock, in the 
Zoological Lecture Room. 

2. The Debating Club contest at 
! the regular meeting of the Club, on 
I Wednesday evening March 9th, in th<- 

Agricultural Room. 

3. The Junior-Senior Contest on 
Friday evening, March 1 Ith, com- 
mencing at 7 00 o'clock, in the Zoolo 
gical Lecture Room. 

Any necessary changes will be made 
by Chapel announcement. From these 
contests, six men will be chosen to en- 
gage in the Final Contest on Wednes- 
day evening, March 23rd. Other 
Students wishing to contest should send 
in their names a? once. 



LATEST NEWS FROM MARS 

[Continued from first page.] 

Mars"said Mrs. Todd.- 'but neither do I 
say that there is not. It is possible. 
The theory is that the Martians know- 
ing the scarcity of their water supply, 
may perhaps lead away the meited 
frost and ice to a place where it can 
be used, and that the channels appear 
broader because bordered with vegeta- 
tion. Professor Lowell of Harvard 
has just announced the discovery of an 
entirely new canal. 

"There have been seen and photo- 
graphed now, 170,000,000 stars, 
and still they lie about us undiscovered, 
in every direction. Then imagine our 
tremendous conceit in saying that we i 
and our civilization are the only things; 
of their kind in a universe of over 
170*000,000 stars and planets. So it 
seems to me quite possible that there 
are inhabitants on Mars. And some- 
how it makes this great enormous 
universe a little less lonely to think 
that as near as Mars there may exist 
a civilization like ours. " 



'03. — The "dinner" to be given by 
Dr. Franklin to the members cf the 
graduate school, as announced in a 
previous issue of the Signal took 
place last Saturday evening at the 
insectary in the form of a card party. 
A select few of Dr. Franklin's friends 
were present. 



T. 1^. 



r»Aioi$ 



Hack, Livery and Feed Stable 



AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE 
IN CHAPEL 

In order that the various it' ma in 
the large appropriations ask^d for by 
the Massachusetts Agricultural college 
might be fuliy understood and invesii- 
gated, the joint committee on agricul- 
ture from the Legislature journeyed 
to Amherst Thursday afternoon and 
spent that evening and a part of the 
following day on the campus. 

An enthusiastic meeting was held 
in chapel Friday morning at nine 
o'clock and several student represent- 
atives presented to the committee Ike 
need of an athletic field. H. W. 
Bianey 1911, the first speaker, out- 
lined the general need of the student 
body, while E. Farnum Damon 1910 
dealt particularly with the question of 
an enclosed field. 

Roger Eddy, 1910, spoke very 
creditably of the need of a recreation 
field for general use, and demonstrated 
that such a field would help to raise 
the physical and mental standard of 
the college as a whole, and would pro- 
mote a spirit of democracy among its 
students. 

The president of the college senate, 
W. E. Leonard, 1910, summed up 
the matter by saying "Athletics have 
an acknowledged place in the colleges 
of today. If we are to keep up with 
the crowd we must do something 
toward procuring an athletic field. 
The rapid growth of the college 
demands it. It is necessary in order 
that athletics may be self-supporting. 
It is necessary for the general physical 
welfare of the college. Students and 
alumni stand ready to equip the field, 
if only the Legislature will appropriate 
money for the purchase of land. The 
land will never again be as cheap as 
it is now. Why not procure it now?" 

President Butterfield then called on 
a number of members of the com- 
mittee. Among them were Mr. Bout- 
well, Senator Mellen, Mr. Gardner, 
chairman of the House Committee, 



Special Attention Given To Inception Work. 



Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE! 



AMHERST, MASS. 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 



MICH CLASS 



. . . TAILOK . . . 

Foreign and domestic woolens always on hand. These 
goods arc of the most exclusive patterns, and my work is 
guaranteed to be tailored in the latest style and workmanship. 

Clemning % Altering, Repairing and Pressing 

A Specialty. 
Full Dress Suits to Rent. The only film e in town. 

A nice line of MEN'S FURNISHINGS. The famous 

Eagle Shirt, the E. & W. (Redman's Brand) Collars and 
Dress Shirts. Special Dancing Cloves and Dress Tics. 
Nice new line of Necktie Pins. Cuff Buttons and Studs. Bos- 
ton Garters, Suspenders, &c. 



LABROV/TZ 



1 1 Amity St. 



Phone 302-4. 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College Kn^'raving House in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS RINS 



Dance Programs 
and 

Invitations 
Meow 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 

.uid 

< lass Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and ( lass 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, March i, 1910. 



GOODS FOR MEN. 



Dr. Smith, the local representative, POULTRY COURSE 

M. F. Dickinson and Mr. Howard. Schedule for the first week of Poul- 
All showed an interest in the athletic try course is as follows : 
field problem and assured the stu- j Monday, Feb. 28 — Morning, regis- 
dents of their co-operation in the trotion and assignment of rooms at 




matter. 



C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 



English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



.•..^^^^^^^^^^^^^■.^^^^^^^^^^••^^'•'•■'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'•'''•'•'•'•WAVV 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



VESPER SERVICES 

THE IDEALS OF COLLEGE. 

President A. P. Fitch of Andover 
Seminary was the speaker at the Sun- 
day vesper service; the subject of his 
address, Ideals of College Life. He 
was assisted in the service by Mr. W. 
: T. Moog, organist of Smith College, 
and by Mr. M. Warren, vocal soloist, 
of Northampton. 

President Fitch is a graduate of 
Harvard University, the class of nine- 
teen hundred. He speaks simply, sin- 
cerely, beautifully. Hand in hand 
with his words goes the power of his 
manly personality. He speaks not 
into the ears of his listeners but into 
their very hearts. 

"Not till the college man has joined 
the ranks of the alumni does he see 

THE SHELDON STUDIO the ful1 8 lor y of undergraduate years. 

Embarked on the longer, sterner 
^— ^™~ ~— struggle of life he looks back with pro- 

tective tenderness upon the college 
boys ; and, looking back, knows tnat 
the college days were and ever will be 

A Specialty of College Classes. the f re est. the happiest and the most 

blameless of all the days of his life. 



office of director of short courses ; 
2-15 p. m., "Poultry Breeding and 
Management," John H. Robinson of 
Boston; 3-15 p. m., "Poultry Breed- 
ing and Management," Prof. F. C. 
Elford, MacDonald college, Quebec. 
Tuesday, March 1—8-15 a. m., 
"The Colony System of Housing 
Poultry," Prof. Elford; 9-15 A. m., 
"Feeds, their Composition and Use," 

a. m., "The 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



102 Main St. 



THE OLD HORNER DRUG STORE. 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 
Custom Work- 



Holland's Block. 



- I l. AM 11 l TING, 
GAS KM 1 IMG, TINNING. 



Phoenix Row 



Telephone 59—4. 



M. ft KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's lilock, Amhkkst, Mass. 



I t-l>-|>hone or call 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



A Specials of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

6 Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, 



MASS 



E.R. DICKINSON D.D.S 

DBXTAI. ROOMI 

Williams Block, 



Orni I Hours: 
Otol0A*M*I*0OtoSP.M a 



Ether and Nitrous 
stered when desired 



FOR FARMS 



Bie 



Village 



Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 
Homes or Huilding 



in 



Lots 



Amherst or Vicinity, 
Inquire 

W. R. BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k. 
Amherst, - - - Mass. 



R. L. Grlbben; 10-15 
Economic Aspects of the Poultry 
Industry." John H. Robison; 11-15 
a. m., "Soils and Drainage for the 
Poultry Yard." Prof. William D. 
Hurd; 1-15 p.m.. "Feeding Poultry 
for Market," Professor Elford; 2-15 
to 5 p.m., ''Practice Work in Poultry- 
House Construction, or Killing and 
Dressing Poultry," Mr. Jewett or 
Professor Elford. 

Wednesday, March 2 — 8-15 a. m., 
"Diseases of Poultry and their Treat- 
ment," Dr. James B. Paige; 1015 
a. m , "Systems of Poultry Keeping," 
Mr. Robinson; 11-15 a. m., "Crate 
and Pen Fattening," Professor Elford; 
1-15 p. m., "Strawberries," Piof. F. 
C. Sears; 2-15to500p. M., "Killing 
and Dressing Poultry," Mr. Jewett or 
Professor Eliord; 7-30 p. m.. "Poul- 
try Keeping," John H. Robinson. 

Thursday, March 3 — 8-15 a. m., 
"Fe ding Poultry for market." Pro- 
fessor Eiford ; 9-15 a, m. , "Vegetable 
Growing as an Adjunct of the Poultry 
Business," C. S. Heller ; 10-15 A. m., 
• ' Post- Morte m Examination of Fowls, ' ' 
Dr. Paige; 11-15 a. m., "Selling 
Poultry Products." Mr. Robinson; 
1-15 p. m., lecture on "Capons and 
Caponizing," Dr. George Shurtleff of 
Boston; 2-15 to 4-15 p. m., " Dem- 
onstration of caponizing," Dr. 
Shurtleff. 

Friday, March 4 — 8-15 a. m., 
"Feeds their composition," Mr. Grib- 
ben ; 9-15 a. m., "Egg production," 
Mr. Robinson; 10-15 a. m., "Vege- 
table Growing as an Adjunct of the 
Poultry Business," Mr. Heller: 11-15 
a. m., "Judging Utility Poultry," Pro- 
fessor Elford ; 1-15 p. m., "Poultry 

ingeach dependent upon the other, Houses " Mr .Robinson ; 2-15to5-00 

Oxide (ias admin- instead of devoting most of his time to | p M ^ ..practical Work Constructing 
play to the detriment of his work. PouUry Houses> or K „ Mng and Dress . 

He will, through the few years of his )Rg p oultry> .. Mr Jewett or Professor 

college life, continue to cultivate £|ford . 7 . 30 p ^ -Poultry Keep- 
friendships which shall endure as long jng) " p ro f > p. q Elford. 



These are his ideals of college life, 
Northampton, Mass. framed out nis man > s w j sc jom and 

experience; habitual, efficient and 

joyously performed work; friendship; 

the fostering of a boyish instinct which 

will, in later years, give rise to a pure 

iove for one woman ; the worship of 

God. Then, on the other hand, are 

the ideals which his man's wisdom 

proves to be mistaken ones: — the 

struggle to attain high academic rank 

at the expense of all other college 

Cut flowers always on hand, activities; the inclination to be a sport 



and an idler at the expense of aca- 
demic rank; the measurement of a 
college curriculum by Its value in dol- 
lars and cents. 

The boy goes to college in order to 
learn to be a man ; to teach boys to 
be men is the underlying motive of all 
Amhkkst, Mass. co n eges . if, through the training of 
the college, the boy does become a 
man he will fuse work and play, mak- 



J. H. TROTT 



Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 



as life itself lasts. He will keep his j 

mind and body unsullied by evil in I 

order that in after years, he may offer 

to the woman whom he wishes to 

make his wife an untarnished affection. m m 

And, finally, he will hearken to the CONNECTICUT ALUMNI MEET 

call of God, making his way of living A thoroughly enjoyable time was 

the sure evidences of ihe God-like had by the alumni attending the ninth 



Saturday, March 5—8-15 a. m., 
"Breeding Problems," Mr. Robinson; 
9- 15 a. M., "Marketing Poultry," Pro- 
fessor Elford. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 36-12. 



spirit that is within him 

'85. 

bury, 



—Prof. C. S. Phelps of Salis- 
Conn., was the speaker at a 

Farmer's Institute held in Williams- 

bnrg last week. 



annual reunion of the Connecticut 
Valley Alumni association which was 
held at the Hotel Heublein, Hartford, 
on Friday evening, Feb. 18. 

After the dinner the president of the 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 1, 19 1 . 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



association, G. A. Parker '76, intro- 
duced Dr. Joseph E. Root 76, as 
toastmaster. Dr. Root replied in his 
usual humorous strain and then called 
on Dr. James B. Paige '82 as repre- 
senting the college. 

Dr. Paige told of the progress being 
made at the college and the plans to 
be carried out in the future. It is 
safe to say that Dr. Paige's talk gave 
those present a better idea of the ad- 
vancement made by the college than 
they have had since graduation. 

Rev. Herbert Judson White ex-' 87 
states that in his opinion" M. A. C. 
was the best agricultural college in 
America. 

A letter from Prof. S. F. Howard 
giving the latest triumphs by the track 
and hockey teams was received with 
much enthusiasm. 

Other speakers were W. H. Double- 
day ex-'74. G. A. Parker '76, J. H. 
Putnam '94, Chas. L. Brown '94. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Uldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



Geo. C. Hubbard '99. 

The following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: President, 
John Minor '73; 1st Vice-President, 
Herbert Myrick '82; 2nd Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. H. Putnam '94; Secretary, 
Allen Bleook '92 ; Treasurer, Asa 
S. Kinny '96. 

Those present were J. B. Eaton 
'98, Dr. Chas. A. Goodrich '93, 
Chas. L. Brown '94, J. H. Putnam 
'94, Dr. James B. Paige '82, B. F 
Barnes Jr., '09; W. L. Ide '09; 
Allen Bleook '96, W. L. Pentecost 
'96, E. B. Smead '71, Geo. C. 
Hubbard '99 ; John B. Minor '73, 
Edward B. Spell '03, W. R. Pierson 
'01, W. B. Hatch '05. Rev. H. ]. 
White '87, William H. Doubleday 
'74, Dr. Joseph Root '76, G. A. 
Parker '76. 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amhkkst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney 'io, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt *io for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

F. B. McKay acted as judge for the 
Inter- Society contest on last Saturday 
evening. 

POMOLOGY. 

The Senior class in Systematic Po- 
mology is planing to hold a fruit exhi- 
bit at Wilder Hall, Friday evening 
and Saturday of this week, March 4th 
and 5th. The exhibit will include col- 
lections of apples from many parts of 
the United States and Canada, fruit 
packed by members of the class, or- 
chard appliances, etc. Every one in- 
terested in this work is invited to at- 
tend, 

BOTANY. 

The programme for the last Botany 
seminar was : — 

Parthenogenesis — O. C. Bartlett. 

Gumosis of the Plum— R. D. Whit- 
marsh. 

Florists using grafted stock aim to 
secure, at least, a profit of fifty cents 
per square foot of ground covered. 

AGRICULTURE. 

Mr. A. B. Allen, the senior member 
of the firm of Allen Brothers, spoke to 
the class in Farm Buildings and Ma- 
chinery Saturday, Feb. 26th. 



THE H. L. FROST & BARTLETT CO. 



Landscape Foresters and Entomologists 

STAMFORD. CONN. 




THOMAS 
PHOSPHATE POWDER 

BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE) 

SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 

At the Great Fruit Show held at Boston, Mass., 
October 18-24, '909, fruit grown on Thomas Phos- 
phate Powder, ( Uasic Slag Phosphate) took Nine 
First Premiums, Two Second Premiums, Pom 
Third Premiums, including a Silver Cup and a 

Silver Medal. This frint was raised by Mr. 
GsoRGf \ Drew, of Connecticut, M. .\. C, Class 
of '897. (Our pamphlet M Up To Date Fruit (.row 

ing" is sent free if you mention Tin ColUgt Signal) 

The Coe-Mortimer Co.. 

24-26 STONE STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

We also distribute from Bottom, Mass, iw-iiast. Mi-., Baltimore, 
McL Wilmington, N.C, .Savannah, <ia.. and Charleston, S 



FATIMA™^ 1811 

liTl 1 1 M U^L CIGARETTES 

* 20 for 15 c-ts O 

A LITTLE card party. 
*• *• Weather threatening. 
Too inclement to venture 
out. A glowing fire in the 
grate and Fatima Cigarettes. 

The smoke that makes the evening. 
A fragrant blend of Turkish tobacco that 
pleases the taste. 

There are tv/enty exquisite cigarettes 
in each package. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 







The College Signal, Tuesday, March 1, 1910. 



GOOD SHOWING 



[Con'inued ''oni first oage] 

Barrows. Lew ran a strong race and 
cut Wendell's lead down to fifteen 
yards. Wood of Wesleyan and Clapp 
ran the last relay and the race ended 
with Wesleyan In the lead by about 
twenty yards. Time, 3 min. 44 1-5 
sec. This time was the fastest of the 
evening and considered very good in 
view of the fact that spikes were 
prohibited, that no rosin was put upon 
the floor, and that ihe track had no 
banks. Points scored in relay : 
Wesleyan 5, M. A. C. 3, Tufts 1. 

Total score of triangular meet : 
Wesleyan 13, M. A. C. 11 and 
Tufts 3. 

In the half-mile novice, open, our 
entries were Barrows and Cowles. 
Wood of Yale set out at a great pace, 
and after two laps had a lead of half a 
lap. This he held, and he won 
handily, Barrows took second beating 
Cowles out by inches. Time, 2 min. 
10 4-5 second. 

Huntington was our oniy entry in 
the running high jump. He failed to 
qualify, going out at 5 ft. 5 in. Can- 
field of Yale won with 5 ft. 9 1-8 in. 
Huntington was also in the pole vault 
but failed to qualify Gardren of Yale 
who won this event. 

The 12 lb. shot-put was won by 
Parkinson of Wesleyan with a put of 
44 ft. 1 1 3-4 in. Samson took sec- 
ond with 44 ft. 5 in. 

In the mile relay, open event, 
Wesleyan, Yale and Trojan A. C. be- 
sides Massachusetts, had entries. 
Our team consisting of Nielson, 
Cowles, Barrows and Caldwell, running 
in the order named, finished third, 
about a quarter lap behind Wesleyan, 
the winner, and 20 yards behind Yale. 
The time 3 min. 48 sec. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ADDITIONAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Helow is a list of courses offered by the College for the first time in 
1909 1910. Several other courses have been greatly amplified and extended. 

In the Department of Agricultural Education: 



Seminar in Education. 



In the Division of Agriculture: 



v-m.nt, Dairy Cattta, deeding and M aaagurwat of Fan* Lh* Stack, Mark* Mitt, nutter 



I- 
Improve.... 
Making, Manufactured Milk Products. 



In the Department of Chemistry: 



Advanced Analysis, Chemistry of Sugar Making and Helming. 

In the Division of Horticulture: 

||„-l.,t.-,ature.»f Horticulture. Practical PoBofegir (special), Greamhoaae D«««f" a nd Co "- 



.traction! V^^Z^C^'h^oiT^c^ ^U Jrnamenta. (,a,de,.,ng 



In the Division of Humanities 




Allen Bros. 

Contractors & Builders. 
Painting, 

Electrical Work. 



.turn \ilv Hired v Muuy. ' 'ration, .■irguiiieiu.iuuii •"■" '"■"•"•■■' , ,, ' , 

i , rsej hiend. I an 'u ue and literature (cfoubto course), Advanced German (doable course), 
ir.','linis..,,dlnvest^,tH,n(..ern,.,n) (double COUfMj, HtatOT, and Interpretation of Musu 



Department of Political Science— 

|„ oaoadc History, 1 lie History of New Kngland, The History of Ideals. 

In the Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Civil Engineering: 

Analytic Mechanics, Descriptive Geonietiy. 

In the Department of Physical Kducation and Hygiene: 

Hygiene. Kl.-mentaiv<;ymi...stic.s,(;r.ided(iymn.istics, Heavy (.n nia.iastics, I raining Course, 
Advanced (iymtiastics. 

In the Department of Rural Social Science: 

l-lenu-nts of Agricultural Kcononiics, Historical and Comparative Agriculture, 5p« 1ft) Pro- 
blems in Agricultural Economics, Seminar (double course). 

The term "double cou.se" indicates that the . ourse is given for both semeste rs o( the year. 



Amherst, Mass. 



SIGNAL DIR 

The College Senate, 

Athletic Board, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Index, 

Nineteen Hundred and Twelve Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Debating Club, 

Dramatic Society. 

M. A. C. Literary Monthly, 



ECTORY 

William E. Leonard, President 
Prof. S. F. Howard, Secretary 
J. F. Adams, Manager 
C. A. Lodge. Jr., Manager 
R. S. Eddy. Manager 
1 G. Schermerhorn, Manager 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 
H. W. Blaney, Manager 
F. A. Castle, Manager 
F. T. Haynes, President 
R. H. Allen, President 
L. S. Dickinson, Mat.ager 
H. W. French, President 
B. Ostrolenk, President 
A. H. Sharpe, President 
F. L. Thomas, Manager 



F. C. PLUMB 

Barber Shop 

All work of a first class order. 
Electrical Massage 



AMHERST. MASS. 

COLLEGE PRESSING 
SHOP 

BEST of Cleansing, PftBSMMG, 
Dyeing, and Repairing. 

TICKET SYSTEM 



The Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths 
Diamond Merchants 

PHILADELPHIA'S 

Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALTIES IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, Kin«s, 

Charms. Prises, I rophies, Medals, 

College I'ins. Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms. 



When Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



No. 19 Pleasant St., Rear Henry Fish's 
Store. 
G. N. Lew and C. K. Roberts. 



CARS 



JACKSON &> CUTLER 



Leave AGOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEUE at 7 and 37 mlm. past each 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at Reasonable Rates 

AMHERST & SUNDtRLMIO ST. RY. CO. 



Jacob Reed's Sons, 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MANUKACllJRKRS OF 



Do you want Security for Borrowing; 

Money to continue your College 

Course? 

Lift Insurance Ottr* to Von a cheap 
ami Legitimate form of Security. 
Come around and talk it over. 

MASS. MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

Irvtnj (!■ Davk, Agent, 12 North 



UNIFORMS 

Of highest possible character, at lowest prices 
consistent with their quality and workmanship. 



SPRINGFIELD 
REPUBLICAN 

The Best Newspaper for the 
College Man. 

All the News and the Truth 
About It. 

Special Correspondence from Am- 
herst and the Colleges. 



Daily $8. Sunday $2. Weekly $1. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XX. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, March S, 1910. 



No. 20 



SONG RECITAL 

Miss Bullard Gives Second Concert of 

the Course. Classic and Modern 

fc-chools Represented. 

The large gathering in the chapel 
Wednesday afternoon, at tne second 
of the winter concerts, enjoyed a most 
delightful program rendered by Miss 
Edith Alida Bullara, soprano, an ar- 
tiste of remarkable ability and charm. 
She was assisted at the piano by Miss 
Alice Siever Pulsifer, who contributed 
to the program Liszt's trar.scirption of 
Gounoa's Faust Waltz. Miss Pulsifer 
responded to an encore with a "Ro- 
mance." Miss Builard and Miss 
Puisifer are the artistes who, a year 
ago, gave a Mendelsohn-Chop, n re- 
cital. The program was varied both 
the classic and modern schools being 
represented. The first part cons.sted 
of old Italian and Frencn airs with a 
modern French aria by Massenet. 
The second part included Russian 
and Norwegian songs. Part there 
was made up entirely of German lyrics ; 
the last part consisted of old Scotch 
and English folk-songs and well-known 
Iriih-American airs. 

1 he program : 

I. 

Nina. Pergolesi. 

LaPastorelia. Veracinni. 

Bergerette. Old French Air. 

Aria " Heroaicade." Massenet. 

(II est doux, il est bon.) 

1 1. 
Red Sarafan. Old Russian. 

But Lately in Dance. Arensky. 

Good Night. Rebenstein. 

I Love Thee. Grieg. 

Faust Waltz Tanscription. 

Gounod- Liszt. 
Miss Pulsifer. 

Ml. 
Joseph, Lieber Joseph Mein, 

XlVth Century Air. 
Hedge Roses. Schubert. 

Abends. ) _ 

Er hat die Rose sich beklagt \ f " ranz - 

Allerseelen. Strauss. 

IV. 

My Love's an Arbutus. Old Irish 

Loch Lomond. Scotch. 

It was a Lover and His Lass. English. 

The Night has a Thousand Eyes. 

Foote. 
The Nightingale has a Lyre of Gold. 

Whelpley. 



'08. — F. A. Johnston, for the last 
two years a student in the graduate 
school, has taken a position with the 
United States department of agricul- 
ture in the bureau of entomology. Mr. 
Johnson's appointment went into effect 
March 1 and for the present he will be 
stationed at Norfolk, Va. 



TEAM WINS TROPHY 

Track Team Easily Runs Up 42 Points 
Against Union's 17. 

Our track team again showed its speed 
yesterday by winning the dual meet ( 
wi'h Union college with a score of 42 
points to 17. A handsome shie.d is 
now added to our trophy room to mark 
the success of the first M. A. C. track 
team that has ever been in a dual meet 
with another college. 

The track was in fine condition, but 
the air was rather cold. The whole 
student body and rmny visitors were 
there to see our boys take six firsts 
and four seconds. Tne 1000 yards 
run came first ; Cowles took the lead 
early in the race and held it for six 
laps, wnen Barrows cams up from the 
rear and won by tnirty yards with 
Cowles second. In the final of the 
thirty yards dasn there was some fast 
and close sprinting, Damon barely 
wining. The 600 yards run was a 
pretty race, in wmch Cap 1 . D.cknson 
and Cloues r=in side by side easily out 
distancing Union, and finishing witn 
aims interlocked. 

The most interesting race was the 
two mile ru >. Tiavis of Union 1 
the lead and made the pace for twtnty- 
one laps. For the next five laps Cald 
well, Rogers and Dee fought for the 
lead, out at the sprint Caldwell showed 
his speed and endurance and cr >ssed 
the tape fifteen yards ahead of De- 
who made a plucky run for second 
place. The Union team was handi- 
capped in the relay, by not having run 
on a track witn banks before and their 
lack of practice was shown when 
Dudley, our last man, finished seventy- 
five yards ahead of his man. Capt. 
Dickinson started off by giving a lead 
of twenty yards to Cloues. Cloues 
and Damon increased the distance ana 
Dudley, although against Union's best 
man, added several yards. 

The high jump was the only event in 
which we were out classed, Case of 
Union winning without much effort and 
showing perfect form. Huntington 
took second place for M. A. C, but 
could not force Case to jump over five 
feet and one inch to win. Samson 
added his five points in the shot put, 
putting eight inches farther than did 
the Union men. 

Four men won their track M's by 
getting first places. They were Damon 
'10, Barrows '11, Caldwell '13. and 
Samson ' 13. 

The heavy weight race caused as 
much excitement as any and was won 
by Robinson '1 1 in the fast time of 44 
seconds. Robinson had the pole from 
the start and it was impossible for 

I Continued on page 8] 



THE COUNTRY PARISH COMPETITION RESULTS 



President Butterfield Addresses Vesper 

Service Sunday on "The Call 

of the Country Parish." 

At Vespers, Sunday evening Presi- 
dent Butterfield gave a lecture on 
'•Ihe Call of The Country Parish." 
one of the taiks given by him at the 
Hartford Theological seminary In ttu 
Carew Lecture Course tnis winter. 

President Butterfield said in part, 
"The country-side is calling, calling 
for men. Taxing problems of labor 
and of lifa d.sturb our mir.ds in coun- 
try as in City. The workers of the 
land are strving to make better use of 
their resources of soil and Climate and 
are seeking bjth larger wealth and a 
higher welfare. But the striving and 
thr seeking raise new qurstions of 
great public concern. Social institu- 
tions have develop-d to moot these 
new issues. But th-? great need of 
the present Is leadership. Only men 
can vitalizi institutions. Ws need 
leaders among the farmers themselves, 
we need leaders in better farming, 
leaders in education, leaders in organ- 
ization and Cooperation, So the coun- 
ny cmircii .j .ai,i..g for men \A God lu 
go forth to war against all the powers 
of evil that prey up:>n tne hearts of the 
men who live upon the land, as well as 
upon the peoph in pa ace and tenement. 

President Butterfield went on to 
show the kind of man wanted by the 
country church. He said that the 
church wanted men of vision, practical 
men, original men, aggressive men. 
in n wi;h sufiicient training, men with 
enthusiasm, persistent and construct- 
ive men. He showed how the coun- 
try church problem appealed to men. 
There is an appeal in the greatness of 
the problem, in the rural society needs. 
in th j charms of the pastor's life in a 
country p rish, in the cpp3rtunities 
offerea by the country parish for 
Dr-adth of culture, in the presence of 
difficulties In the country church work, 
in the dearth of men for the work, in 
the pioneer character of the work, in 
its timeliness and most of all in the 
hunger of men and women for religion. 

Tne speaker brought up the question 
"What shall be done to arouse the 
country church, to give it its rightful 
place among the forces at work for 
solving the rural problem? " 

'•We must ask men to concentrate 
themselves to life-long service in the 
country parish. We must root out 
the idea that only inferior men can 
find a permanent work in the country 
church. We must go to the men now 
toiling in the rural parishes with a mes- 
sage of cheer, of cooperation, of en- 

[ Continued 00 papa 4] 



Blaney and Allen of 1911 to Head New 
Board. 

With tnis issue comes the retire- 
n- tit uf the Senior members of the 
Signal board. There also comes to a 
co-.e the Signal con petition which 
Deen in progress since last Sep- 
tember. ByasysUm of credits for 
bcth literary aid practical work done, 
one Junior, two Sophomores and two 
Frrshmen are elected to the board to 
take the place of the retiring members. 
This system has been thoroughly 
worked out during the past year and 
has been found, with a few possible 
changes, to be entirely feasible. It 
stimulates an interest among the con- 
testants, and the rivalry during the 
year has been quite sharp. It is the 
advice of the retiring members that 
the plan be continued, with a possible 
change in the manner of theme cor- 
rection. One credit is given for 10 
inches of original copy, for 15 inches 
of reprint, for five hours of actual 
work, and for an advertisement to the 
amount of $10. Following Is the 



result of tne competition: 






ClCUI.j. 


191 1. 




P. W. Pickard, 


5.08 


1912. 




M. C. Pratt, 


8.57 


R. N. Halbwell, 


7.457 


1913. 




B. H. Van Zwalenberg, 


31.266 


S. M. Jordan, 


16.07 


0. G. Anderson, 


12.911 


F. D. Griggs, 


10.11 


H. M. Baker, 


7.51 



At tne lirst meeting of the new 
board, Herbert W. Blaney wa. 
elected editor in-cnirf; Park W. Allen, 
business manager; and Albert W. 
Dodge, assistant business manager. 



REPORT OF BASEBALL SEASON 
1909 

RECEIPTS 

From Athletic Board $479 54 
Guarantees 803.50 

Gate receipts 30 50 

Bills paid by Prof. S. F. 

Howard 456.05 



Total 

EXPENDITURES 

Equipment $339.13 

Guarantees 280.00 

Trip Expenses 788.96 

Coach 264.95 

Miscellaneous 96.55 



$1769 59 



Tctal 



1769 59 



Balance 0000.00 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. J. Burke, Mgr. 
Approved 
John N. Summers, Auditor. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 8, 1910. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

WALTER R. CLARKE. 1910. EdItor-ln-Chlef. 
HENRY A. BROOKS 1910. College Notes. 

LOUIS C. BROWN, 1910. Athletic Notes. 

JOSIAH C. FOLSOM. 1910, Alumni Notes. 

EDGAR M. BROWN. 1911. Department Notes. 
HERBERT W. BLANEY. 1911, Colleg* Notes. 
FRANK A. PROUTY. 1911. 

SIGNAL OFFICE HOURS. 

Ed'tor— Every day at 1 to 1-15 p. m. 

Tuesday. Thursday and Fridays from 0-30 
to 7-30 p. m. 
Manager— Tuesday. 6-30 to 7-30 p. m. 

Wednesday 9- 1 5 to 10 a.m. and 6-30 to 

7 p. m. 

Thursday 1 1-15 to 12 m. 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

E. FARNHAM DAMON. 1910. Business Manager. 
PARK W. ALLEN, 1911. Asst. Business Manager. 
ALDEN C. BRETT, 1912, Circulation. 

ALBERT W. DODGE. 1912. Circulation. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable to 
E. Farnham Damon. 



COLLEGE NOTES 

Frank A. Prouty and ParkW. Allen 
have been chosen to take charge of 
nineteen eleven's part in the com- 
mencement sing, 

At a recent meeting, the Junior 
class decided to hold their Junior ban- 
quet at the St. Denis hotel, New York, 
on Friday April 22nd. The banquet 
committee consists of : Chairman Her- 
bert W. Blaney, Edward A. Larrabee 
and Harry F Willard. The class 
intends to remain in New York over 
Saturday and Sunday following the 
banquet. 

The Senior class has arranged the 
following program of class day 

speakers : Planting of class ivy, Class 

President; Ivy poem, Raymond J. 

Fiske; Class oration, William E. 

Leonard; Class ode, Sumner C. 

Brooks; Class oration, Myron S. 

Hazen ; Hatchet oration, Louis 

Brandt ; Pipe oration, Roger S. 

Eddy. 




Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Poet Office. 



With one or two exceptions, we 
not expect you to buy these 
Shoes for several years to come. 
However, we do expect you to 
come in and see our 

$4,00 COURT TIES 



JUST THE KIND FOR 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS. 



Patent Leather Silk Top Button Boots 

$6.00. 

REPAIRING MODERN WAY. 

JAMES F. PAGE. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 8, 1910. 



Vol. XX. TUESDAY, MAR. 8. No. 20 



Another Informal March 19th. 

M EN _"The Call of the Country 
Parish." 



Money may be the root of all evil, 
but nevertheless our baseball season 
must spring from it, it it grows. 



What one loses another gains is 
corroborated by the fact that while 
South College lost, the Dining Hall is 
richer — in crockery. 



With this issue, the 1909-10 Signal 
Board passes from office. The Board 
wishes to thank the faculty, alumni, 
and students for their generous support 



INFORMAL 

By far the largest and most success- 
ful Informal Dance of the year was 
held in the Drill Hall last Saturday 
afternoon and evening, March the 5th. 
There will surely be a need of an en- 
largement of the present hall or a 
change in arrangements if the present 
rate of increase in attendance at the 
informals is kept up. There were 
eighty couples present, making the 
floor slightly crowded, but in spite of 
occasional accidents, the jollity of the 
crowd was not decreased in the least. 
The decorations of the hall were 
modelled on the Junior "Prom" dec- 
orations : The white walls with bands 
of maroon and streamers of the same 
color hanging to the center of the ceil- 
ing, the festoons, wired with maroon 



E E. MILLETT 

Jeweler and Optician. 



FIRST CLASS 

BOOT <& SHOE 
REPAIRING 

AT 



Violin, Banjo, Mandolin, and Guitar Strings 

Full line of College Jewelry 
Oculists' prescriptions filled. 



LOWEST PRICES 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m 
All kinds of Shoe Shines 
Open Sunday until 12 M. 



L E* V I N E 

n 1-2 Amity St. Amherst. 



DEUEL'S 
DRUG 



Next To-PogT-oFFiCK 



supported and It is to this, that the 
success of the Signal has been due. 
To the new board our plea is: profit 
by our mistakes; be original; keep 
alive. 



and white lights, and the arc lights, 
In every way they have responded and | coverec j w j tn laurel. A large M. done 

in red, white and blue lights hung 
under the balcony at the south end of 
the hall. At the north end of the hall , 
a large national flag hung three-fourths 
of the way across, leaving the other 
fourth as a passageway to the section 
of the hall beyond, which was also 
used for dancing. The patronesses' 
chapel. Concert, Musical Or- | corner, in the southeastern end of the 
ganizations. Trials for college | hall, was prettily decorated. 

The running-track was used as a 
promenade by the dancers, making the 
campus appear as if summer were 
here. 

Bryant's orchestra of Orange fur- 
nished music for the dancing. Mrs. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

March 9.— Assembly, 4-30 p. m. in 



debating team, for members of 

Debating club. 
March 10.— 6-45 p. m., Y. M. C. A. 

in chapel. Trials for college 

debating team for members of 

MO and Ml. 
March 1 1.- Trials for college debating Rowe served supper at Draper Hall at 

team for '12 and '13. 6 o'clock, after which dancing was 

March 12— Relay team entered to continued until 9 o'clock. 

run at Madison Square Garden The patronesses were: Mrs. E. A. 

in New York. White and Mrs. F. B. McKay of the 

6-30 p. m. Union entertainment college ; Miss Edgerton of Mt. 

in chapel, Irvin S. Cobb. ; Holyoke and Mrs. Howes of Smith. 

March 13.— Vesper service 5-00 p. m. ! Those present were : 



Gillette Safety Razors 

Gillette Blades 

Gem Junior Safety Razors, $1.00 

Ever Ready Safety Razors 

Blades 

Colgate's Rapid Shave Powder 

Colgate's Talcum Powder 
Tooth Powders and Tooth Pastes 



Columbia 

Graphophones 

Indestructible Cylinder Records 



M. A. C. Seals, Pennants, etc. 



COTRELL and LEONARD 



ALBANY, 
N.Y. 






Makers 
of 



& GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the At- 
i lantic to the Pacific. Class Contracts a 
Specialty. 



Johnson, Leonard, Mendum, Nickless, 
McLaine, Rockwood and Waldron. 

1911 — Armstrong. Baker, Bentley, 
Blaney, Johnson, Larrabee, Lodge, 
Nickerson, Ostrolenk, Piper, F. A. 
Prouty, Robinson, Stevenson, Whit- 
ney and Winn. 

1912— Birdsall. Brett, Carpenter, 
Hallawell, Hills, Hemenway, Peck- 
ham, Pierpont, Pratt, Philbrick, Ray- 
mond, Robinson, Tower, Walker and 
I. Williams. 

1913 — Baker, Bursley, Clark, 
Cooper, Edminster, Everson, Finne- 
gan, French, Goodnough, Griggs, 
Harley, Hayden, Jones, Howe, Harris, 
Pellett, Post, Ryder, Whitman. 

Also Mr. C. R. Duncan, H. M. 
Jennison '08, G. H. Chapman '07, 
R. D. Whitmarsh '08, L. S. Walker 
'05, John Noyes '09, J. C. Reed and 
Searles and Bacheldor of the Short 
Course. 



1 


05.- 


-Borr 


at Vacaville 


. c 


al., Feb. 


18. 


to 


Mr. 


and Mrs. 


F. 


L. 


Yeaw, a 


son 


• 













There are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



OK 



THURBER'S I C - R - ELDER 



BOARD AT $3.50 

The vote of the student body that 
the price of board be dropped to $3.50 
per week and a charge be made for 
second order on meats and desserts 
has been put into action and the sys- 
tem started off successfully this week 
at the Dining Hall. By vote of the 
College Senate, Myron S. Hazen '10 
and Herbert W. Blaney 'II were 
made the members of the student 
committee on Dining Hall and they 
have revised the rules and adopted 
measures whereby the new systems 
can be carried out. Those of the 
rules which it is well to have under- 
stood by every boarder at the Dining 
Hall are : 

Board shall be $3.50 per week. 

There shall be a charge of five 
cents for extra meat and ice cream 
orders, and three cents for all other 
extra dessert orders. 

Tickets for "seconds" may be 
obtained from the collector's desk. 
No "seconds" will be given for cash. 
The tickets are fifty cents and provide 
for seven 5 cent orders and five 3 c^nt 
orders. 

There will be no "seconds" on fruit 
at breakfast and sauce at supper. 
There are no rules governing other 
orders than those mentioned above. 

No breakfast will be served after 1 
7-35 a. m. on week-days and 9-00 A. M. ! 
on Sunday. (This rule must be ! 
observed.) 

All crockery and silverware must be 
signed for at the collector's desk when 
taken from the Dining Hall. 



Folsom '10 



Nickless '10 



Aggie 
Store 



Clapp '12 



Beers '12 



in chapel, Rev. C. W. Mer- 
riam of Greenfield. 
March 15.— Stockbridge club in Agri- 
cultural room. 



1910 — Annis, Allen, Armstrong, 
Blaney, Brandt, Brown, J. C. Bailey, 
H. A. Brooks, Clarke, Everson, 
Francis, Folsom, Haynes, Holland, 



Deuel's Drug Store 



AMHERST, MASS. 



STATIONERY 



ASK 
YOUR STATIONER 



FOR 




Ward's Fountain Pens, Fine Papers 
and Envelopes, Students' Supplies. 
See our samples of Engraved Invita- 
tions, Class and Fraternity Paper. 
Banquet Menus, Visiting Cards, &c. 



Don't Swear 

At your fountain pen if it 
sweats and blots and goes by 
jerks. 

DON'T KICK"' if you get 
your hands all dirty by filling it 
with that Medicine Dropper. 
( let the 

Crocker 
Fountain Pen 

"You Blow It 

To Fill lt. M 

(iuaranteed to give satisfac- 
tion. 

SOLD BY 

E. E. MILLETT 

Amherst, Mass. 




Sanderson 
'ft JO k Thompson. 

The store for 

CORRECT CLOTHES. 

We announce our readiness 
■fl to serve the M. A. C. students 
with the 

BEST OUTFITTING 

<^3«ithe country products. 

The Fall Styles are ready 
and every price is a phasing 
one. 

\\ e solicit your considera- 
tion. 

Sanderson 
k Thompson, 



Clothiers, 

Hatters, 

Tailors. 



SENIOR FRUIT SHOW 

The annual fruit show of the seniors 
in Pomology was held at Wilder Hall 
last Friday and Saturday. The feat- 
ures were the collections of apples 
from the West and South, from 
Quebec and New England; the fruit 
bought at fruit stands, showing what 
people pay for good apples ; the exhibit 
of cooked foods into which apples 
enter; the display of apples packed by 
the class ; the orchard and packing 
honse implements; last, but not least, 
the trophies won by the class team at 
the New England fruit show at Boston 
last fall. 

The collections of apples from var- 
ious parts of the country and Canada 
were large and varied. New England 
fruit set against it showed clearly that 
there are apples grown here which are 
as good or even better than the foreign. 
The largest individual collection was 
that from the New England fruit show, 
comprising 74 varieties of apples. 

The display of fruit bought in open 
market was marked with the prices 
paid, these running up to even fifteen 
cents each for western apples, showing 
how good fruit is priced. The cooked 
exhibit was extremely tempting in its 
variety and tastefulness. Boxes and 
barrels of apples packed by the class 
formed another exhibit. Orchard and 
packing house implements in large 
variety were shown. 



The late A. W. Cheever, a former editor of the New 
England Fanner, once said in regard to fertiliser*: '"l am 

not concerned so much to learn what elements I c.111 do 
without as to know how much I can use to good advantage." 

It is always safest to use- a complete fertilizer; the coat of 
what v<m may consider the "extra" elements may he < harmed to 
insurance, and a most valual lurancc it tomet 

The only element likely to be lost by leaching is tin- nitrogen; 
and if through a poor season it turns out to have been an exces- 
sive application, a catch crop will save it. The fanner who 
gambles on what his soil may contain takes as many chain es .is 
the gambler who speculates in stocks bought on margin. 

It is better to apply tin- Stockbridn Spe. i.iI < ompWt« Manures ..ml 
insure the crop than to apply incomplete lertili/crs nnr) I. 

Study the plant food problt-m. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER CO. 

43 CHATHAM ST., BOSTON 






HOTEL GARDE, 



Asylum, arid High Streets, 



Hartford, Coruv 



One block from Union Station. Beautifully located, facing Bushnell Park 

and State capitol. Connecticut's largest and most modem hotel, on 

direct motor route from New York to Boston. Garage. 

Banquets a specialty. Walter S. Gakdk. 



£&rp?rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



Printing House Square, 



Amherst, Mass. 



WARD'S 



57-63 Franklin Street 
BOSTON. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 8, 1910. 



ONE MONTH WITH THE BLUES ! 

You have decided to have a blue or gray suit this Spring. 

And we have decided to sell it to you. 

The price is so low you can not pass it up. 

For one month, only to students. 



A. P. SIM 

Worsted & Woolens 



N 



Concord Jet, - - Mass. 

$3F Local Agent, Henry A. Brooks, '10. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



We Carry 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, FOUNTAIN 
PENS, and PICTURES. 

Call in and see our large assortment 
of Posters and pennants for room 
decorations. 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



HOREY'S SNAPS No. 12 



M.D.GILMAV C. A. MOFKKT. 

TELEPHONE 1079-3. 

GILMAN and M OFFET, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers 

CONFECTIONERY. 

MftOttl Main Stkkkt. 

Worckstkk, Mass. 



25 different Foreign Copper Coins 50C1S. 

25 " dates large U. S. Copper cents 

$1.00 

6 " dates 2Cts. pieces 50C1S. 

6 " dates 3CC pieces 5octs. 

6 " dates nickel cents 2scts. 

25 " Broken Bank and Confederate 

Bills $1.00 

Send for my Monthly Mail Auction ( .rrulars mid 
Helling price list. 




COX SONS 



AND 



VINING 

262 - 4th Avenue, New York. 



GAPS and GOWNS 



H 



E. MOREY BEST MATERIALS and 

NuinlMiintUt, 
19 WASHINGTON ST, BOSTON. WORKMANSHIP 



THE COUNTRY PARISH 

[Continued from first raga.] 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 8, 1910. 



couragement. We must appeal to 
the seminaries and other training 
schools for preachers. We must go 
to the colleges, and appeal to strong 
young men who want hard places, who 
love to take chances, who have withal 
the desire to serve their fellows might- 
ily. We must appeal to the heroic in 
young men." 

In closing President Butterfield 
said, "Let not our eyes be blind to 
these deep needs of our rural life, nor 
our ears deaf to the call of the country 
parish. The time for a great work is 
at hand. The country church is ladl- 
ing a present crisis." 

DEBATING CLUB. 

The regular meeting of the club was 
held March 2nd. The programme 
consisted of a debate Resolved, That 
the United States establish a parcel 
post system. The affirmative was up- 
held by Folsom '10 and Burbe '13, 
while the negative was vigorously de- 
fended by L.H.Bailey '10 and Barrows 
Ml. A discussion of the question by 
the members of the club followed. 

The business meeting resulted in 
the election of the following officers: 
President, B. G. Southwick '12; sec- 
retary, R. K. Clapp '12; treasurer, 
D. Baker, '13 ; oratory council mem- 
ber, H. M. Baker '11; Reporter, B. 
Ostrolenk '11; credit secretary, R. H. 
Patch '11. 




ffl)uTl. 



i 



A GOOD THING 

It's a good thing not to have to worry 
about your pedal apparel, its cor- 
rect style, comfort or dura- 
bility. 

Walk-Over Shoe 



Wearers never worry because 
know that their shoes are 
right. 
Prices $3.50, $4.00, $5.00. 



they 



E.M.BOLLES 

"THE SHOEMAN." 
Tel. 94-4 

S. S. HYDE 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 



7 Pleasant St. 

Amherst, 



Phillips Block 
Mass. 



^E. N. PARISEALU* 



PUBLIC SPEAKING COUNCIL 

A council has just been organized to 
take charge of all Public speaking con- 
tests and to determine the general 
policy to be followed in connection with 
them. It will be known as the Public 
Speaking Council, and is composed of 
one representative from each of the 
three upper classes and the Debating 
Club and the Instructor in Public 
Speaking. At the first meeting held 
last Friday evening, the following 
officers were elected : D. E. Bailey, 
1910. president; H. J. Baker, Debat- 
ing Club, vice-president; E. B. 
Young, 1912, secretary; P. A. 
Racicot, 191 1, treasurer. 

This council will have charge of the 
contests, by arranging the time and 
place of each, assigning contestants to 
places, and securing judges for the 
same. It will hereafter propose the 
question to be used in local debating 
contests, and also the question pro- 
posed tor intercollegiate debates, and ; 
will make, and modify when necessary, i 
all rules governing Public Speaking 
contests. 

The organization of this Council is 
the outcome of the belief that the stu- 
dents themselves should largely con- AllTOS FOK 
duct the contests in Public Speaking, CHANGE. 
not only for the added interest that will 
be created, but for the added experi- 
ence which they will get out of it. 
With more time given to instruction 



HAIR DRESSING SALOON. 



No. 2 Pleasant, St., Amherst, Mass. 



M. B. MAGRATH &SON 

Passenger and 
Baggage Transfer. 



Orders left at the Amherst House will receive 
prompt attention. 



WARREN AUTO CO., 

15 Maple Street, 
Northampton, - Mass. 



Hire 



and Ex- 



We have the agency for the 
Ford Cars you hear praised 
so highly. Five passenger 

in Public Speaking, with the contests Touring Car, all complete, 

broadened in scope, with a generous $950. 



list of prizes, and with increased inter- 
est both in the collegiate and the inter- 
collegiate contests, the outlook for the 
new Council is indeed promising. 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI 
BANQUET 



T. Iv. PAIGE 



M. A. C. DAY AT SOUTH 

HADLEY A SUCCESS 

Students of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College gave an entertaining 
and instructive program before an audi- 
ence of 300 at the March meeting of 
the Hampshire County Pomona Grange 
last Thursday. A bountiful dinner was 
served by the ladies of the South 
Hadley Grange to which the 19 mem- 
bers of the Aggie delegation did full 
justice. The meen'ng was open at 
1-30 when County Lecturer Morse 
introduced Professor McKay as chair- 
man, and for two hour, the audience 
was treated to a program of music, 
readings, speeches, and a debate, 
broken only by the generous 
applause which followed every number. 
Encores were given the college 
orchestra, the college quartet, the 
cornet solo by R. L. Whitnry, and the 
readings of Doth H. M. Biker and A. 
H. Sharpe. whih ringing manifesta- 
tions of approval were accorded the 
speech of Thomas Homenway and the 
45 minute debate by I. C. Gilgore, B. 



The seventh annual banquet of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
club of Washington was held in the 
Y. M. C. A, building of that city, Sat- 
urday evening Feb. 26th. Ten alumni 
and former students, and Dr. A. C. 
True, Director of the Experiment sta- 
tion wo.k for ihe United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture were present. 
G. A. Billings '95 acted as toastmas- ! 
ter. Dr. True spoke very ably on the 
importance of graduate schools and 
the value of extension work in connec- 
tion with our Agricultural colleges. 
P.J. Watts representing the college 
spoke of the additions and changes 
during the past year in the departments 
I and plant of the college; described 
some of the improved conditions of 
stud-nt life; explained briefly the more 
important items included in the legisla- 
tive budget; and touched upon the 
future development and influence of 
the college. In response to the toast 
"What M. A. C. has done to dev 
Agriculture." Dr. E. W All-n '85 
of the division of experiment stations, 
presented statistics, showing the various 
occupations in which our alumni are 




Special Attention Given 'To Reception Work. 
Garage Connected. 



REAR OF AMHERST HOUSE 



AMHERST, MASS. 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 



iiuni CLASS 



Ostrolenk. H. F. Wiilard, and P. A. 

Racicot on the question of a parcels ™* a e ed ' and ,he number engaged in 

Dost. The nrnoram rin^H uath .h- each - H - L - Knight "02 spoke of the 



post. The program closed with the 
singing of '• Old Massachusetts," and 
the " Massachusetts" yell. The 
motion for a vote of thanks as w-ll 



light '02 spok 
opportunities for M. A. C. men; the 
two lines of activity which he men- 
tioned as offering spec ; al inducements, 
were those of teaching in secondary 



as the many expressions of appreciation 

which followed showed that the work sch ' J0,s of agriculture, and exu-: 

of the delegation was well received, WOrk ' F - Fl Henshaw '04 respc 

and undoubtedly a similar program will t0 th " ,oast " How can the a,umnj he! P 
be desired next year A L Wright , th ~' r A ' ma Ma,er? " 9nd E- W\ Morse 

of the South* Hadley Grange vokin- e *"' 94 ' diSCUSSed the ques, ° n of 

teered the *, a t.m„nt *.. .«. a,, whether a greater number of M. A. C 



teered the statement that, "in the 
opinion of those present, the reputation 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege has gone up 50 per cent." 



$2543.70 



REPORT OF FOOTBALL SEASON 
1909 

RECEIPTS 

Received frorr Athletic 

Association $1000.00 

Guarantees received 1205.00 

Home Games 82.40 

Springfield Game 256.30 

Expenditures 
Expenses of trips $1370 59 

Expenses of home games 22150 

44c.OO 

266.52 

5.80 

10.00 

87.68 

6.42 

27.35 

22.15 

11.66 

4 75 

5.25 



Coach 

Wright & Ditson 

Campion 

Fish (repairing) 

Sweaters 

Express on goods 

Doctors bill 

Medical Supplies 

Labor (college! 

Lime 

Stamps 

Telegrams and Telephones 13.41 

C & M. (Printing) 11.15 

Incidentals 3.8 1 



alumni should go ba~k to the farms. 

Severa, tcpics such as the athletic 
field, the housing problem and frater- 
nities, were informerly discussed by 
those present. 

The following officers for 1910 were 
elected : President. W. A. Hooker 
'99; first vice-president, F. F. Hen-! 
shaw '04; second vice-president, H. 
L. Knight '02; secretary and treas- 
urer, C. H. Griffin '04; choregus, 
James Hyslop '08. 

The enthusiastic dinner party broke 
up at twelve o'clock with the singing 
of "Old Massachusetts." and cheers 
for Alma Mater. 



. ..TAILOR.. . 

Foreign and domestic woolens always on hand. These 

goods arc of the most exclusive patterns, and my work is 
guaranteed to be tailored in the lateM style and workmanship, 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing and Pressing 
A Specialty* 

Full Drtsx Suits /o Rent. The only place in town. 

A nice line of MEN'S Kl RNISHINGS. The famous 

Eagle Shirt, the E. & W. (Redman's Brand) Cellars and 
Dress Shirts. Special Dancing Gloves and Im.ss Ties. 
Nice new line of Necktie Pins, ( lufl Buttons and Studs. Bo* 
ton Garters, Suspenders, <S:c. 

LABROV/TZ 

1 1 Amity St. Amherst, Mass. 

Phone 302-4. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOT 

COMPANY 

The Largest College En-raving Hotttt in the World 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

CLASS DAY PROGRAMS AND 

CLASS PINS 



Balance 

Signed 
Approved 



R. H. Allen. Mgr 



Mar. 5. 1910. 



John N Summers. Auditor. 



F. G. Helyar, a graduate of the 
University of Vermont, and for one 
year emDloyed by the chemical depart- 
ment of the Massachusetts experi- 
ment station, has been selected out of 
fifty applicants for the head of the New 
State School of Agriculture to be 
iocated at Morrisville. The position 
is an important one, Mr. Helyar being 
required under the direction of the 
$35 66 I trustees to equip and organize the new 
school, Mr. Heiyar's many friends in 

Amherst Will be glad to learn that he WORKS, 17th STREET <£ LEHIGH AVENUE 

has been thus hnnnr^rl —»w«»_ 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



2508.04 



Dance Programs 
and 

Invitations 
Menus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 

and 

< 3m Inserts 

for Annuals 

Fraternity 

and C1«M 

Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 8, 1910. 




•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.••■•••••••••••■••.••••'•••••••'•••■•'•••'• ••••••••••••••• 

GOODS FOR MEN. 

C. & K. Derbys, 
Reiser Cravats, 

^^j English and Scotch Woolens. 

THE BIG COLLEGE STORES. 

CAMPION, 

AMHERST. DARTMOUTH. 



HOCKEY ELECTIONS 

At a meeting of the Ice Hockey 
association the following elections, for 
the season of 1910-11, were made: | 
Captair, James F. Adams of Melrose ; 
manager, George P. Nickerson of 
Amherst. Caldwell '12 and Wood 
'12 were nominated for the assistant 
managership. 




NOTICE 

At the Mass- Meeting on the Dining 
Hall conditions a collection was taken 
to pay the expenses of the Investiga- 
tion Committee. The total collection 
amounted to $5.01. Total expenses 
$3.50, leaving $1.51 to turn over to 
the Athletic Association. 

M. S. Hazen. 



must be those demanded by the taste 
of the public. Killarney, white Kill- 
arney, and Aaron Ward are the now 
popular varieties. 

Charles H. Totty of Madison, N. J., 
spoke to the Floriculture classes Feb. 
28th on Chrysanthemums. The his- 
tory of this flower has been marked by 
growth in size, color, and number of 
popular varieties. The first seedlings 
were exhibited at the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society in 1879. The 
French and English introduced varie- 
ties can not stand our climatic condi- 
tions so have met with little success in 
America ; while the Australian plants, 
which are grown under similar condi- 
tions to ours, are the chrysanthemums 
of today. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, March 8, 1910. 



HENRY ADAMS & Co. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



THE OLD CORNER DRUB STORE. 



HIGH GRADE WORK 
A Specialty <>f College Classes, 



MISSION STUDY 

The new Y. M. C. A. mission study 
class, organized by R. W. Wales 
1912, now consists of fifteen members 
and will hold its third meeting n-xt 
! Thursday evening at 7-45 o'clock. 
The class is studying Barton's »*The 
Unfinished Task" and the work is 
being supplemented by a large mis- 
sionary map of the world. F. B. 
McKay is acting as leader. The 
! course closes the last of April and is 
open to all men interested. 



102 Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 



1911 Index 

A Word to Students 
and Alumni! 



COLLEGE SHOEMAKER 
J. W. T. DAVIS. 

Fine Repairing a specialty 
Custom Work 



M. B. KINGMAN 

M. A. C '82, 

FLORIST 

Store Hunt's l'.lock, Amhkkst, MASS. 
Cut flowers always on hand. 

I elcphone or call. 



Holland's Block. 



STEAM FITTING, 
GAS PITTING, TINNING 



Phoenix Row 



hone 59—4' 



CHARLES DANCE & SON, 

PLUMBERS. 



E.R. DICKINSON D. OS. 

OlSIV'lWI^ WOO AIM 

Williams Block, AMHERST, Mass. 

< 'llli 1: Iloi'RS: 
OlolUA.M. I.JIOto.-H'.M. 



LIBRARY. 

The following works may be men- 
tioned among the recent accessions to 
the library : 

Bailey : Training of farmers. 
Cosmopolitan Magazine, v. 40-47 
190509. 

Devine : Social forces. 
Ferguson and Lewis : Element iry 
principles of agriculture. 
Fisher and Cotton : Agriculture for 
common schools. 

Mill : International geography, 3d ,2. 
New York Farmers : Proceeaings 

1906-07. 

Schmidt: Shakespeare lexicon. 

Watkins : King cotton. 

Wing : Alfafa farming in America. 

Woll : Handbook for farmers and 

dairy men. 



You should have a 
copy of every Annual 
to refer to. Students 
especially should cher- 
ish the Indexes pub- 
lished while they are in 
college. 

Also, you owe it to 
every Index to give 
your financial support 
by buying a copy. 
About ONE-HALF the 
students have not 
bought an Index. 



A Specialty of Repairinc 

CHURCH Windows, 

Memorial Windows. 

I. had Lights, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave.. AMUKKST. MASS 



FOR FARMS ! 

Big, Little or Middle Sized. 

Also 

Village Homes or Building Lots 

in 

Amherst or Vicinity, 

Inquire 

W. R. BROWN 

Savings Bank Bl'k, 
Amherst, - - - Mass. 



Ktlier and Nitrous Oxide Gil admin- 
stered when desired 



J. H. TR0TT 

Plumber, Steam & Gas Fitter, 
Dealer in Stoves and Ranges. 

Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 
Telephone 30-12. 



FLORICULTURE. 

Mr. W. H. Elliott, who has large 
rose houses at Maddenbury, N H, COfTie! ShOW YOUi SplFlt ! 

and Brighton, Mass., spoke to the 
Floriculture classes, Monday, Feb. 
21st, on " Rose Growing as a Busi- 
ness." The more important points 
mentioned were ; location, type of 
house, soil and varieties of roses grown. 
The site is of primary importance. 
It must be near proper soil, have 
plenty of water and must have facilities 
for shipping. The best type of rose 
house is the large even-span house, be- 
couse of the increased use of filling 
and emptying beds, and the lessened 
cost of management and heating. The 
rose soil is a clayey sod enriched 
either by natural manures or commer- 
cial fertilizers. The varieties grown 



PRICE, $1.50. By Mail, SI.75. 

Herbert W. Blaney, 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

1911 Index. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations, violets and chysantheniums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. A/. 



BE SURE 



you see the Agents for the Amhkkst 



Co-op Laundry, 



J. P. Blaney '10, Agent 



Also see Louis Brandt 'io for dry 



Cleaning and Pressing. 



The different types of flowers are : 
the single, the pompon, \h<* Chinese 
incurving and outcurving, the anemone 
and the ostrich plume. The first type 
Is rapidly increasing in popular demand 
while the last named type is declining. 

To obtain good cuttings select only 
the strongest suckers from the old 
plants. Insert in sand for about three 
weeks, preferably in the month of 
March and then remove to a fairly rich 
loam. Pinch back the terminal buds 
in order to secure a crown bud in the 
ni'ddle of August. From the time 
the plants g-t well established in the 
beds and begin to show signs uf lack of 
nutriment teedmg has to begin. 
Liquid manures with nitrate of potash 
and bone meal make a balanced ratio 
for the best development. Keep a 
night temperature of from 45 — 50 
and stop feeding vfaen the crown bud 
breaks enough to luw color. 

Mr. Totty has a range of fifteen 
houses costing $130,000. His work 
in chrysanthemum raising has b*-en 
successful, having taKen many p::. 
at flower shows. Several of his 
houses are devoted to raising stock 
plants and others are used for a rota- 
tion of sweet peas and chrysanthe- 
mums. 

E. O. Orpet of South Lancaster 
lectured to the floriculture classes on 
"Orchids" March 1st. Orchid grow- 
ing is a branch of florists' work that is 
rapidly increasing. Cattleya, Cypri- 
pedium and Dendrobium are the three 
genera which are most extensively 
grown. Care in watering, heating, 
fumigating and fertilizing are most 
necessary for successful growing. 
Hybrids flower more profusely, givr 
b